Foodies rejoice: 9 cooking vacations to take

For many foodies, the art of cooking has evolved beyond a hobby and into a passion. Knowledge about what people are putting into their bodies, how it is being prepared, finding the best way to add the most nutrients that will excite your palate are topics of interest for many travelers.

Culinary tourism, or trips where you can watch cooking demonstrations and join interactive cooking classes, are all the rage. So, if you’re inspired to take your kitchen skills to new heights, start plotting your next food-focused getaway.

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Iliana de la Vega, who runs the internationally known Oaxacan resturaunt El Naranjo, cooks a stuffed ancho chile in her resturaunt's kitchen in Oaxaca City Thursday, Dec. 12, 2002.  Behind are chefs Lucio Morales, right, and Marcos Velazquez. City officials decided this week to prohibit the golden arches from doing business under the historic stone archways of Oaxaca's 16th century central plaza, also known as the zocalo. The battle has divided this picturesque community between those who want to preserve its cultural identity and others who simply want a job. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
An Intrepid Travel Real Food Adventure
Oaxaca, Puebla and Mazunte, Mexico

Get an authentic taste of Mexico on a journey through some of the country’s most famous culinary regions. Meander through Oaxaca‘s aromatic markets and take to the streets of Puebla to sample some the city’s local specialties. Explore Mexico City on a taco crawl to experience a delightful culinary heritage that goes back thousands of years. In Oaxaca, enter the heart of pre-Hispanic cuisine and taste chocolate, mezcal and the surprisingly delicious chapulines (grasshoppers). Afterward, take to the sea on a fishing expedition out on the Pacific Ocean, where you will eat fresh ceviche on a pristine beach.

[See: 6 Grown-Up Summer Camps and Other Vacations for the Young at Heart.]

(AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

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Iliana de la Vega, who runs the internationally known Oaxacan resturaunt El Naranjo, cooks a stuffed ancho chile in her resturaunt's kitchen in Oaxaca City Thursday, Dec. 12, 2002.  Behind are chefs Lucio Morales, right, and Marcos Velazquez. City officials decided this week to prohibit the golden arches from doing business under the historic stone archways of Oaxaca's 16th century central plaza, also known as the zocalo. The battle has divided this picturesque community between those who want to preserve its cultural identity and others who simply want a job. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

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