Bryce Harper agrees to record deal with the Phillies

Bryce Harper
FILE – In this Sept. 26, 2018, file photo, Washington Nationals’ Bryce Harper, looks at the baseball field from their dugout before the start of the Nationals last home game of the season against the Miami Marlins in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File) (AP/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
BALTIMORE, MD - JULY 10:  Bryce Harper #34 of the Washington Nationals and Manny Machado #13 of the Baltimore Orioles talk during their game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on July 10, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
Bryce Harper #34 of the Washington Nationals and Manny Machado #13 of the Baltimore Orioles talk during their game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on July 10, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Rob Carr)
WASHINGTON - AUGUST 26:  Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals takes batting practice at Nationals Park on August 26, 2010 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Greg Fiume/Getty Images)
Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals takes batting practice at Nationals Park on August 26, 2010 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Greg Fiume/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Greg Fiume)
SCOTTSDALE, AZ - OCTOBER 23:  Washington Nationals prospect Bryce Harper #34 playing for the Scottsdale Scorpions hits a single against the Phoenix Desert Dogs during the AZ Fall League game at Scottsdale Stadium on October 23, 2010 in Scottsdale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Washington Nationals prospect Bryce Harper #34 playing for the Scottsdale Scorpions hits a single against the Phoenix Desert Dogs during the AZ Fall League game at Scottsdale Stadium on October 23, 2010 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Christian Petersen)
Bryce Harper, smiles, at a news conference where the Washington Nationals basetball team introduced him as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Bryce Harper, smiles, at a news conference where the Washington Nationals basetball team introduced him as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Alex Brandon)
Washington Nationals' Ryan Zimmerman, left, shakes hands with Bryce Harper at a news conference where the Nationals introduced Harper as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010. Harper  agreed to a $9.9 million, five-year deal with the baseball club last week. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Washington Nationals’ Ryan Zimmerman, left, shakes hands with Bryce Harper at a news conference where the Nationals introduced Harper as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010. Harper agreed to a $9.9 million, five-year deal with the baseball club last week. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Alex Brandon)
Ryan Zimmerman, right, helps Bryce Harper put on his new jersery, at a news conference where the Washington Nationals introduced Harper as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Ryan Zimmerman, right, helps Bryce Harper put on his new jersery, at a news conference where the Washington Nationals introduced Harper as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Alex Brandon)
In this photo taken April 30, 2010, Bryce Harper plays with College of Southern Nevada Coyotes baseball team in Henderson, Nev. Bryce Harper's story book tale is nearly complete as major league baseball's amateur draft approaches, one year and 29 home runs after Sports Illustrated pegged the teen as the LeBron James of the diamond.  (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)
In this photo taken April 30, 2010, Bryce Harper plays with College of Southern Nevada Coyotes baseball team in Henderson, Nev. Bryce Harper’s story book tale is nearly complete as major league baseball’s amateur draft approaches, one year and 29 home runs after Sports Illustrated pegged the teen as the LeBron James of the diamond. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Isaac Brekken)
Bryce Harper
The helmet of Washington Nationals Bryce Harper sits in the dug out box before the start of the Nationals last home game of the season against the Miami Marlins in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) (AP/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Washington Nationals Bryce Harper greet the city Little League champions the Mamie Johnson team on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018. (Courtesy Washington Nationals Baseball Club)
Washington Nationals Bryce Harper greet the city Little League champions the Mamie Johnson team on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018. (Courtesy Washington Nationals Baseball Club) (Courtesy Washington Nationals Baseball Club)
Bryce Harper
Washington Nationals’ Bryce Harper yells at the umpire after flying out during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Nationals Park, Friday, Aug. 31, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (AP/Alex Brandon)
Washington Nationals Bryce Harper stands with his father Ron Harper after Bryce won the Major League Baseball Home Run Derby, Monday, July 16, 2018 in Washington. The 89th MLB baseball All-Star Game will be played Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Washington Nationals Bryce Harper stands with his father Ron Harper after Bryce won the Major League Baseball Home Run Derby, Monday, July 16, 2018 in Washington. The 89th MLB baseball All-Star Game will be played Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (AP/Alex Brandon)
Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper hits an RBI-single during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Sunday, July 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
Washington Nationals’ Bryce Harper hits an RBI-single during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Sunday, July 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass) (AP/Nick Wass)
Bryce Harper
Washington Nationals’ Bryce Harper comes out of the dugout to celebrate Ryan Zimmerman’s three-run home run in the eighth inning in Game 2 of baseball’s National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs, at Nationals Park, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (AP/Alex Brandon)
Bryce Harper
Washington Nationals right fielder Bryce Harper leaps for but misses a double by Atlanta Braves’ Kurt Suzuki during the fourth inning of a baseball game, Thursday, July 6, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass) (AP/Nick Wass)
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Bryce Harper
BALTIMORE, MD - JULY 10:  Bryce Harper #34 of the Washington Nationals and Manny Machado #13 of the Baltimore Orioles talk during their game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on July 10, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - AUGUST 26:  Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals takes batting practice at Nationals Park on August 26, 2010 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Greg Fiume/Getty Images)
SCOTTSDALE, AZ - OCTOBER 23:  Washington Nationals prospect Bryce Harper #34 playing for the Scottsdale Scorpions hits a single against the Phoenix Desert Dogs during the AZ Fall League game at Scottsdale Stadium on October 23, 2010 in Scottsdale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Bryce Harper, smiles, at a news conference where the Washington Nationals basetball team introduced him as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Washington Nationals' Ryan Zimmerman, left, shakes hands with Bryce Harper at a news conference where the Nationals introduced Harper as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010. Harper  agreed to a $9.9 million, five-year deal with the baseball club last week. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Ryan Zimmerman, right, helps Bryce Harper put on his new jersery, at a news conference where the Washington Nationals introduced Harper as their first overall selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, at Nationals Park in Washington Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
In this photo taken April 30, 2010, Bryce Harper plays with College of Southern Nevada Coyotes baseball team in Henderson, Nev. Bryce Harper's story book tale is nearly complete as major league baseball's amateur draft approaches, one year and 29 home runs after Sports Illustrated pegged the teen as the LeBron James of the diamond.  (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)
Bryce Harper
Washington Nationals Bryce Harper greet the city Little League champions the Mamie Johnson team on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018. (Courtesy Washington Nationals Baseball Club)
Bryce Harper
Washington Nationals Bryce Harper stands with his father Ron Harper after Bryce won the Major League Baseball Home Run Derby, Monday, July 16, 2018 in Washington. The 89th MLB baseball All-Star Game will be played Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper hits an RBI-single during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Sunday, July 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
Bryce Harper
Bryce Harper
DC fans reacts to the Bryce Harper deal (WTOP/Mike Murillo)

WASHINGTON — Free agent and now-former Washington Nationals outfielder Bryce Harper has agreed a record-setting 13-year, $330 million contract with the Philadelphia Phillies, according to multiple reports.

Harper’s deal, which reportedly includes a full no-trade clause and no opt-outs, is the largest free agent contract in professional sports history in terms of total value, surpassing Giancarlo Stanton’s 13-year, $325 million deal in 2014. The annual value of $25.4 million trails Manny Machado, who signed a 10-year, $300 million contract with the San Diego Padres last week, and Alex Rodriguez ($27.5 million in 2008) among non-pitchers.

Harper gets a $20 million signing bonus, a $10 million salary this year, $26 million in each of the following nine seasons and $22 million in each of the last three years. None of the money is deferred.

The Nationals, for whom the 26-year-old former NL MVP was an All-Star in six of his seven seasons, reportedly offered Harper an extension late last season, which he declined, choosing to enter free agency. In addition to Philadelphia, the San Francisco Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers had also pursued Harper in recent weeks.

In his seven seasons in Washington, Harper played 927 games and tallied 521 RBI and 184 home runs, a .279 batting average and .900 OPS. His WAR was 27.4 over his seven seasons, including a 10.0 WAR in 2015, when he was his unanimously voted NL MVP.

The Harper signing is the cherry on top of a busy offseason for the Phillies, now the favorite in the NL East after seven consecutive non-winning seasons. Philadelphia added outfielder Andrew McCutchen and reliever David Robertson in free agency, and traded for coveted catcher J.T. Realmuto and shortstop Jean Segura. Having played his entire career in the same division as the Phillies, Harper already knows their ballpark well.

An up-and-down defender and an unusual mix of popular and polarizing, Harper is known for the occasional contretemps with opponents, one particular exchange with a reporter about a “clown question” and, most infamously, a dugout dustup in which he was choked by then-teammate Jonathan Papelbon during a game.

Washington took him with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2010 amateur draft and called him up to the majors less than two years later at age 19. He would go on to become the 2012 NL Rookie of the Year for a Nationals club that won its first division title and made its postseason debut.

Harper was also an integral part of the team that added NL East titles in 2014, 2016 and 2017 and never finished lower than second place in his seven seasons. Another key stat, though: The Nationals never won a playoff series in that span.

In what turned out to be his final hurrah in Washington, and Nationals Park hosting the 2018 All-Star Game, Harper stole the show the day before the Midsummer Classic by winning the Home Run Derby before an ecstatic crowd filled with folks wearing his No. 34 Nationals jersey. Harper wore a headband with the D.C. flag’s design, reflecting his oft-stated pride in playing for Washington.

Now, the Nationals look to rebound from a non-playoff, 82-80 season under rookie manager Dave Martinez with younger phenoms Juan Soto and Victor Robles in the outfield along with veteran Adam Eaton. Soto’s debut 2018 season yielded 70 RBI and 22 HRs along with a .292 batting average and .923 OPS; Robles has a .277 batting average and .843 OPS in 34 games the last two seasons.

'It's going to be tough' for Harper (MLB.com columnist Richard Justice with WTOP's Shawn Anderson and Hillary Howard)

In the area, baseball fans shared their views on the deal. Eric Carter, who lives in D.C. and is a life-long Phillies fan, said that he hopes Harper gets off to a fast start because “in Philly, it’s not going to go well for him if he starts a little slow, especially for that kind of money.”

Nats fan Deangelo Jackson expressed disappointment in the deal. “To get rid of your star player, your franchise play, that you put so much money into. For you not to go ahead and do what was necessary to keep him, kind of like a slap in his face,” he said.

But Jeff Beattie, of Old Town Alexandria, said that he hates to see Harper go but feels that the Nats will be fine without him.

WTOP’s Mike Murillo and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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