RFK Stadium’s iconic orange seats up for sale ahead of demolition

The inonic orange seats at RFK Stadium. The stadium hosts its final United game Oct. 22. (WTOP/Jack Moore)
The iconic orange seats at RFK Stadium.  (WTOP/Jack Moore)

RFK will host the final D.C. United game Oct. 22. The stadium  is seen here on a quiet Friday afternoon earlier this month. (WTOP/Jack Moore)
The stadium, which opened in 1961, is set to be demolished by the end of next year. (WTOP/Jack Moore)

RFK will host the final D.C. United game Oct. 22. The stadium  is seen here on a quiet Friday afternoon earlier this month. (WTOP/Jack Moore)
Events DC said the sale is part of a “Farewell RFK” effort to “celebrate and honor the legacy of the stadium. (WTOP/Jack Moore)

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The inonic orange seats at RFK Stadium. The stadium hosts its final United game Oct. 22. (WTOP/Jack Moore)
RFK will host the final D.C. United game Oct. 22. The stadium  is seen here on a quiet Friday afternoon earlier this month. (WTOP/Jack Moore)
RFK will host the final D.C. United game Oct. 22. The stadium  is seen here on a quiet Friday afternoon earlier this month. (WTOP/Jack Moore)

If you have fond memories of the stands rocking at RFK Stadium and would like to own a piece of history, take a seat.

No, literally.

Events DC announced Thursday it is selling off RFK’s iconic orange seats in advance of the demolition of the 61-year-old sports stadium that once hosted the Washington football team, soccer team D.C. United, and two Major League Baseball teams.

The seats are being sold on Stadium Seat Depot, starting Thursday. For now, sales are limited to the orange wooden and plastic seats from the stadium’s lower bowl. Metal turnstiles are also for sale.

If you want to own a piece of the stadium and aren’t local to the D.C. region, however, beware: The seats must be picked up in-person between Dec. 16 and Dec. 18 from RFK Stadium itself.



Events DC said the sale is part of a “Farewell RFK” effort meant to “celebrate and honor the legacy of D.C.’s most iconic sports and concert venue,” before the stadium is demolished.

The stadium, which opened in 1961, is set to be demolished by the end of 2023.

“The Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium holds special memories for many of us in the community,” said Events DC Board Chairman Max Brown in a statement. “We watched D.C.’s football team win division championships. We saw baseball return to the nation’s capital here. We also saw our favorite bands like the Grateful Dead and Traffic, among others.”

He said the stadium is “woven into the fabric” of the District.

So how much will one of those orange seats cost you? A single wooden stadium seat goes for $399 plus 6% D.C. sales tax and a 3% processing fee. A double set will run you $499.99 plus taxes and fees.

Plastic seats, both single and double set, will run you $50 cheaper. A metal turnstile costs $599.99 plus taxes and fees.

All seats come with a certificate of authenticity and are sold “as is” — and will likely show signs of wear consistent with an outdoor stadium, the website says.

A portion of the proceeds from seat and memorabilia sales will benefit The Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington and St. Coletta of Greater Washington.

The burgundy plastic, gold plastic and gold wooden seats from the upper bowl of the stadium will be part of a second sale expected in early 2023.

The stadium, originally called the District of Columbia Stadium, was renamed in 1969 for senator and presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy, who was assassinated the year before.

The Washington football team, now known as the Commanders, played in the stadium between 1961 and 1996. D.C. United played in the stadium between 1996 and 2017.

Two baseball teams also played in the stadium — the Washington Senators in the 1960s and 1970s, and the Washington Nationals between 2005 and 2007.

The land the stadium sits on is owned by the federal government and is under lease to D.C. through 2036. Mayor Muriel Bowser has proposed spending $60 million to build a new sports complex on the site.

Jack Moore

Jack Moore joined WTOP.com as a digital writer/editor in July 2016. Previous to his current role, he covered federal government management and technology as the news editor at Nextgov.com, part of Government Executive Media Group.

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