DC updates mask policy in government buildings; 2nd gentleman visits vaccine clinic

Second gentleman Douglas Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, speaks to District of Columbia COVID-19 vaccine ambassadors, Thursday, July 8, 2021, at Anacostia High School in the southeast neighborhood of Washington.
Second gentleman Douglas Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, speaks to District of Columbia COVID-19 vaccine ambassadors, Thursday, July 8, 2021, at Anacostia High School in the southeast neighborhood of Washington.
Second gentleman Douglas Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, speaks to District of Columbia COVID-19 vaccine ambassadors, Thursday, July 8, 2021, at Anacostia High School in the southeast neighborhood of Washington.
Douglas Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, waves goodbye after speaking to District of Columbia COVID-19 vaccine ambassadors, Thursday, July 8, 2021, at Anacostia High School in the southeast neighborhood of Washington.
Second gentleman Douglas Emhoff, center top, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, responds to cheers from a crowd of COVID-19 vaccine ambassadors for the District of Columbia, Thursday, July 8, 2021, after he spoke to the group at Anacostia High School after a tour of a vaccination site in the southeast neighborhood of Washington.
Douglas Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, holds up his face mask before putting it away while speaking to District of Columbia COVID-19 vaccine ambassadors, Thursday, July 8, 2021, at Anacostia High School in the southeast neighborhood of Washington.
Douglas Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, puts away his face mask while speaking to District of Columbia COVID-19 vaccine ambassadors, Thursday, July 8, 2021, at Anacostia High School in the southeast neighborhood of Washington.
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D.C. updated its mask policy inside its government buildings, which will take effect next week.

Starting Monday, District employees and contractors who are fully vaccinated will only need to wear a mask in certain settings:

  • When interacting in-person with the public, including customers, constituents, clients and patients.
  • In spaces where the public are routinely present, such as a customer service area or a public-serving area that’s open to the public, such as a library or recreation center.
  • In shelters, correctional or congregate facilities.
  • In a school or educational facility or setting.
  • In a child care or health care facility or setting.
  • When required to wear a mask by an entity or establishment.
  • On public transportation, where wearing of masks is required.

Employees who are not fully vaccinated should continue to wear a face covering when inside D.C. government building. They should also wear a mask if they are inside any other building or outside and likely to be within 6 feet of people.

Members of the public are still required to wear face coverings inside D.C. government buildings.

Second gentleman visits Anacostia High School vaccine clinic

Second gentleman Doug Emhoff dropped his mask on the ground, and when he picked it up, he said, “We won’t need these if we get these vaccinations going.”

Emhoff visited a vaccination clinic at Anacostia High School Thursday, where some 150 volunteers wearing “DC COVID-19 Community Corps” vests greeted him.

Members of the corps canvass neighborhoods across D.C. to help residents plan to get vaccinated at one of the city’s sites. They help D.C.’s efforts to reach unvaccinated people in areas where vaccine rates are lower.

The District is supporting efforts to target outreach to those persons who have not yet been fully vaccinated and areas of the city where vaccine rates are lower.

“I’m a part of this community, so on behalf of everyone who lives here in D.C., thank you,” Emhoff said.

Emhoff told the crowd that he’s been to 20 states in the last few months visiting vaccination sites, and that it’s far too soon to declare victory over the coronavirus.

He said people need to know that the vaccines are safe and the people dying and getting sick are the ones who have not received a dose.

“I’m going to keep talking until I’m blue in the face. I’m going to keep traveling the country,” he said.


More Coronavirus news

Looking for more information? D.C., Maryland and Virginia are each releasing more data every day. Visit their official sites here: Virginia | Maryland | D.C.


Abigail Constantino

Abigail Constantino started her journalism career writing for a local newspaper in Fairfax County, Virginia. She has a master’s degree in interactive journalism from American University and a master’s degree in English Literature from The George Washington University.

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