Protest snarls intersection in NE DC

The intersection in Northeast D.C. that has been blocked by protesters. (D.C. police via Twitter)
The intersection in Northeast D.C. that had been blocked by protesters. (D.C. police via Twitter)

Protesters in front of the fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)
Protesters in front of the Fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)

Proesters in front of the fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)
Protesters in front of the Fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)

Proesters in front of the fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)
Protesters in front of the Fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)

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The intersection in Northeast D.C. that has been blocked by protesters. (D.C. police via Twitter)
Protesters in front of the fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)
Proesters in front of the fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)
Proesters in front of the fraternal Order of Police building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northeast DC. (WTOP/Rick McClure)

WASHINGTON – A protest in front of the D.C. offices of the Fraternal Order of Police led to the blockage of an intersection in Northeast on Wednesday morning.

Demonstrators chained themselves to ladders and railings in front of the building at 328 Massachusetts Ave., Northeast. Clarice McCants, a spokeswoman for the protesters, says the demonstrators represent Black Lives Matter DC, BYP100 and affiliated groups.

“This office is very hidden; no one knows what it is,” McCants said Wednesday, but she calls the police union the force behind measures such as a Blue Lives Matter bill, which provides the possibility of charging those who kill officers with hate crimes.

“We’re here to say ‘No more; not today,'” McCants said.

The protests continued throughout the day Wednesday but is no longer impacting traffic.

WTOP’s Rick McClure contributed to this report.

Rick Massimo

Rick Massimo came to WTOP, and to Washington, in 2012 after having lived in Providence, R.I., since he was a child. He went to George Washington University as an undergraduate and is regularly surprised at the changes to the city since that faraway time.

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