Camera captures another set of soon-to-hatch bald eagle eggs (Video)

The eagle nesting on Thursday evening. (Courtesy MPD/UStream)
The eagle nesting on Thursday evening. (Courtesy MPD/UStream)

The Metropolitan Police Department Academy in Southeast D.C. launched a live stream of its bald eagle nest after the pair of eagles laid two eggs last month. (Courtesy MPD/UStream)
The Metropolitan Police Department Academy in Southeast D.C. launched a live stream of its bald eagle nest after the pair of eagles laid two eggs last month. (Courtesy MPD/UStream)

At the MPD Academy, the camera hopes to capture the hatchings of two new eggs laid last month. (Courtesy MPD/Ustream)

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The eagle nesting on Thursday evening. (Courtesy MPD/UStream)
The Metropolitan Police Department Academy in Southeast D.C. launched a live stream of its bald eagle nest after the pair of eagles laid two eggs last month. (Courtesy MPD/UStream)

WASHINGTON — Bird watchers nationwide who enjoyed live updates as D.C.’s National Arboretum bald eaglets hatched can experience the miracle of life all over again with a new bald eagle camera in the District.

The Metropolitan Police Department Academy in Southeast D.C. launched a live stream of its bald eagle nest after a pair of bald eagles laid two eggs last month.

Sound familiar?

Last week, two eaglets hatched at the U.S. National Arboretum, and the whole experience was captured via live stream. The parents — “Mr. President” and “The First Lady” — have been nesting in a tree at the U.S. National Arboretum since 2014. This year, one egg was laid Feb. 10; a second, on Valentine’s Day.

At the MPD Academy, the camera hopes to capture the hatching of two new eggs laid Feb. 18 and Feb. 20. The bald eagle parents, “Liberty” and “Justice,” have nested at the location for 11 years, police say.

The eaglets are expected to hatch between March 23 and 28.

“[Liberty], the female, has primary responsibility for incubating her eggs and caring for the young chicks, once they hatch. Justice, the male, has the crucial job of catching fish and bringing them for his mate and hatchlings,” police said in a news release.

Police Chief Cathy Lanier named the bald eagle parents when they started nesting at the location in 2005.

Watch the live stream below:

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to reflect the eagle parents’ correct names.

Sarah Beth Hensley

Sarah Beth Hensley is the Digital News Director at WTOP. She has worked several different roles since she began with WTOP in 2013 and has contributed to award-winning stories and coverage on the website.

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