New mayor calls Alexandria a ‘treasure,’ details goals for city

New mayor Allison Silberberg calls Alexandria a treasure that must be protected. (WTOP/ Michelle Basch)
New mayor Allison Silberberg calls Alexandria a treasure that must be protected. (WTOP/ Michelle Basch) (WTOP/ Michelle Basch)
After taking the oath of office, Silberberg received hugs and applause. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
After taking the oath of office, Silberberg received hugs and applause. (WTOP/Michelle Basch) (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
The choir sang at the Alexandria City Council installation ceremony. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
The choir sang at the Alexandria City Council installation ceremony. (WTOP/Michelle Basch) (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
During the ceremony, outgoing four-term Mayor Bill Euille delivered some parting words. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
During the ceremony, outgoing four-term Mayor Bill Euille delivered some parting words. (WTOP/Michelle Basch) (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
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New mayor Allison Silberberg calls Alexandria a treasure that must be protected. (WTOP/ Michelle Basch)
After taking the oath of office, Silberberg received hugs and applause. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
The choir sang at the Alexandria City Council installation ceremony. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
During the ceremony, outgoing four-term Mayor Bill Euille delivered some parting words. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Alexandria’s first new mayor since 2003 talked about her goals for the city Monday night.

Mayor Allison Silberberg and six council members were sworn in at a ceremony at T.C. Williams High School. Councilmember Justin Wilson was elected vice mayor.

After taking the oath of office, Silberberg detailed some of her goals.

“I believe we must create an Ethics Advisory Commission to educate and advise us,” she said.

Other top priorities include public safety, increasing the city’s tree canopy and expanding Sunday hours at the city’s libraries.

The mayor also called the city a national treasure.

“Historic preservation is a core value of our beloved city. Established in 1749, our city is like an ancient redwood that has endured through the centuries. Today, it is as if our city beckons to each of us to hold fast to this tree of life that made us who we are. And so Alexandria, as we grasp the future, we must also protect this treasure for generations to come. It is an honor, not a burden,” said Silberberg.

During the ceremony, outgoing four-term Mayor Bill Euille delivered some parting words.

Euille, the city’s first African-American mayor, said on his last day in his City Hall office he reflected on the view out the window.

“Consider the history of not only City Hall but Market Square, a place where slaves were sold and bought many, many years ago, and the fact that we’ve come so far to be where we are today. That it doesn’t matter what color you are and who you are, but the mere fact that everybody has an opportunity to be positive and purposeful in life, and that really means an awful lot to me,” Euille said.

Euille says he won’t disappear.

“While not holding elective office, I’ll remain active, involved and engaged,” he said.

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