Today in History: Nov. 7

Illustrated cover of the American political magazine Harper's Weekly depicting a Civil War rally in 1862.  (AP Photo)
In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast in Harper’s Weekly. Illustrated cover of the American political magazine Harper’s Weekly depicting a Civil War rally in 1862. (AP Photo)   (AP)
Jeannette Rankin, first woman to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives in Atlanta May 19, 1967, says war is nothing more than a method of settling a dispute, and that the whole war system is very stupid. Miss Rankin, 86, is the only member of Congress to oppose this country’s entry into both world wars. She addressed an Atlantans for Peace meeting  on Thursday. (AP Photo)
In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this Nov. 7, 1940 file photo, a large section of the concrete roadway in the centre span of the new Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapses into Puget Sound between Tacoma and the Kitsap Peninsula, Wa.. Known as “Galloping Gertie”, the bridge became famous for twisting and bending like a ribbon before collapsing in a windstorm on Nov. 7, 1940, four months after opening. Still cited as one of the world’s major engineering failures, the wreckage is now among the world’s largest man-made reefs. (AP Photo/File)
In 1940, Washington state’s original Tacoma Narrows Bridge, nicknamed “Galloping Gertie,” collapsed into Puget Sound during a windstorm just four months after opening to traffic. (AP Photo/File) (AP)
Delivering a brief inaugural address from the portico of the White House, President Franklin D. Roosevelt calls for "a durable peace," Jan. 20, 1945. Others, from left: Edwin Halsey, Secretary of State; three unidentified Secret Service agents; Col. James Roosevelt USMCR; Maj. Gen. Edwin Watson, partially obscured; and Vice President Harry S. Truman. (AP Photo)
On Nov. 7, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented fourth term in office, defeating Republican Thomas E. Dewey. Delivering a brief inaugural address from the portico of the White House, President Franklin D. Roosevelt calls for “a durable peace,” Jan. 20, 1945. Others, from left: Edwin Halsey, Secretary of State; three unidentified Secret Service agents; Col. James Roosevelt USMCR; Maj. Gen. Edwin Watson, partially obscured; and Vice President Harry S. Truman. (AP Photo) (AP)
U.S. President Richard M. Nixon, right, and Vice-president Spiro T. Agnew wave to the Republican National Convention delegates in Miami, Fla., Aug. 23, 1972, who nominated them to run for re-election. (AP Photo)
In 1972, President Richard Nixon was re-elected in a landslide over Democrat George McGovern. (AP Photo) (AP)
Louis Stokes
In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city — Cleveland, Ohio. FILE – In this Saturday, Jan. 17, 1998, file photo, Rep. Louis Stokes, D-Ohio, announces, at the Carl B. Stokes Social Services Mall in Cleveland, that he will retire from Congress at the end of the year. Stokes, a 15-term Ohio congressman who took on tough assignments looking into assassinations and scandals, died late Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Stokes was 90. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File) (AP)
Magic Johnson, Tracy Morgan
In 1991, basketball star Magic Johnson announced that he had tested positive for the AIDS virus, and was retiring. (Despite his HIV status, Johnson has been able to sustain himself with medication.) Here, Magic Johnson and actor/comedian Tracy Morgan sit on the sideline during first half of an NBA basketball game between the New York Knicks and the Los Angeles Lakers at Madison Square Garden in New York, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2015. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens) (AP)
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Illustrated cover of the American political magazine Harper's Weekly depicting a Civil War rally in 1862.  (AP Photo)
Jeannette Rankin, first woman to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives in Atlanta May 19, 1967, says war is nothing more than a method of settling a dispute, and that the whole war system is very stupid. Miss Rankin, 86, is the only member of Congress to oppose this country’s entry into both world wars. She addressed an Atlantans for Peace meeting  on Thursday. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this Nov. 7, 1940 file photo, a large section of the concrete roadway in the centre span of the new Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapses into Puget Sound between Tacoma and the Kitsap Peninsula, Wa.. Known as “Galloping Gertie”, the bridge became famous for twisting and bending like a ribbon before collapsing in a windstorm on Nov. 7, 1940, four months after opening. Still cited as one of the world’s major engineering failures, the wreckage is now among the world’s largest man-made reefs. (AP Photo/File)
Delivering a brief inaugural address from the portico of the White House, President Franklin D. Roosevelt calls for "a durable peace," Jan. 20, 1945. Others, from left: Edwin Halsey, Secretary of State; three unidentified Secret Service agents; Col. James Roosevelt USMCR; Maj. Gen. Edwin Watson, partially obscured; and Vice President Harry S. Truman. (AP Photo)
U.S. President Richard M. Nixon, right, and Vice-president Spiro T. Agnew wave to the Republican National Convention delegates in Miami, Fla., Aug. 23, 1972, who nominated them to run for re-election. (AP Photo)
Louis Stokes
Magic Johnson, Tracy Morgan

Today is Wednesday, Nov. 7, the 311th day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Nov. 7, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented fourth term in office, defeating Republican Thomas E. Dewey.

On this date:

In 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln replaced replace Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac with Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside.

In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast in Harper’s Weekly.

In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress, winning a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

In 1917, Russia’s Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.

In 1940, Washington state’s original Tacoma Narrows Bridge, nicknamed “Galloping Gertie,” collapsed into Puget Sound during a windstorm just four months after opening to traffic.

In 1962, Richard M. Nixon, having lost California’s gubernatorial race, held what he called his “last press conference,” telling reporters, “You won’t have Nixon to kick around anymore.”

In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city — Cleveland, Ohio.

In 1972, President Richard Nixon was re-elected in a landslide over Democrat George McGovern.

In 1973, Congress overrode President Richard Nixon’s veto of the War Powers Act, which limits a chief executive’s power to wage war without congressional approval.

In 1980, actor Steve McQueen died in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, at age 50.

In 1991, basketball star Magic Johnson announced that he had tested positive for HIV, and was retiring. (Despite his HIV status, Johnson has been able to sustain himself with medication.)

In 2001, the Bush administration targeted Osama bin Laden’s multi-million-dollar financial networks, closing businesses in four states, detaining U.S. suspects and urging allies to help choke off money supplies in 40 nations.

Ten years ago: In his first news conference since being elected president, Barack Obama called on Congress to extend unemployment benefits and pass a stimulus bill. The government reported the unemployment rate had soared to 6.5 percent in October 2008, up from 6.1 percent just a month earlier. General Motors Corp. reported a $2.5 billion loss in the third quarter while Ford Motor Co. said it had lost $129 million. A school in Haiti collapsed, killing some 90 people. Mieczyslaw Rakowski, Poland’s last communist-era party chairman and prime minister, died in Warsaw at age 81.

Five years ago: Seeking to calm a growing furor, President Barack Obama told NBC News he was “sorry” Americans were losing health insurance plans that he repeatedly had said they could keep under his health care law, but he stopped short of apologizing for making those promises in the first place. The Food and Drug Administration announced it was requiring the food industry to phase out artery-clogging trans fats. Shares of Twitter went on sale to the public for the first time; by the closing bell, the social network was valued at $31 billion. A Russian spacecraft carrying the Olympic torch and three astronauts docked with the International Space Station ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.

One year ago: Democrats Ralph Northam in Virginia and Phil Murphy in New Jersey were the winners in their states’ gubernatorial elections. Voters in Maine approved a measure allowing them to join 31 other states in expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. President Donald Trump arrived in South Korea, saying efforts to curb the North’s nuclear weapons program would be “front and center” of his two-day visit. Former star baseball pitcher Roy Halladay died when the small private plane he was flying crashed into the Gulf of Mexico; the 40-year-old was an eight-time All-Star for the Blue Jays and Phillies. Twitter said it was ending its 140-character limit on tweets, and allowing nearly everyone 280 characters to get their message across.

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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