By ‘Air’ and by sea: Michael Jordan flies to White Marlin Open

Crew from “Chasin Tail” pose with its 74-pound White Marlin caught on Day 1 of the White Marlin Open. (Courtesy Town of Ocean City)
The Hellsea caught at 22.5-pound dolphin on Day 1 of the White Marlin Open. (Courtesy Town of Ocean City)
(1/2)

The unmistakable personal jet of NBA legend and Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan landed on Maryland’s Eastern Shore on Tuesday, lending credibility to rumors that he would participate in the 46th annual White Marlin Open.

More evidence of Jordan was spotted by sea last week. His 80-foot yacht labeled “Catch 23” — which like his plane, is adorned with the same elephant print on his signature Air Jordan 3 sneakers — was seen on the Ocean City, Maryland waters near the site of the competition.

However, Jordan — who served as the former director of basketball operations and later played for the Washington Wizards in the early 2000s — is not listed among those to have caught any fish, and tournament officials have not confirmed the status of his boat as of Wednesday morning.

Tuesday, the second day of the event that runs through Friday, saw 335 boats participate, down from the 389 that went out to fish Monday. On Day 1, angler Greg Robinson on a boat called the Polarizer caught a 277.5-pound Mako shark. The largest haul of Tuesday’s action was the 465.5-pound blue marlin caught by Craig Dickerson on the aptly named boat, the Haulin Baulin.

More than 400 boats entered the competition with over $6.1 million in estimated prize money up for grabs.

The event also means a huge haul for the Maryland Food Bank, which reportedly netted donations of close to 500 pounds of fish.

Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others.

© 2019 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.

Tommy Hinkle, who won the top prize with a 79.5-pound White Marlin, is the tournament’s first two-time winner. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Brenda Rudnicky holds up an otolith, which is a small fingernail-like growth found in tuna that can be used to calculate the age of a fish. (WTOP/Kristi King)
It’s Day 5 of the White Marlin Open on Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, in Ocean City, Maryland. (WTOP/Kristi King)
A boat is seen on Friday, Aug. 9, 2019 in Ocean City, Maryland. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Crew from “Chasin Tail” pose with their 74-pound White Marlin caught on Day 1 of the White Marlin Open. (Courtesy Town of Ocean City)
The Hellsea caught at 22.5-pound dolphin on Day 1 of the White Marlin Open. (Courtesy Town of Ocean City)
Here’s a poster for this year’s White Marlin Open. (WTOP/Kristi King)
It’s the last day of the White Marlin Open on Friday, Aug. 9, 2019. (WTOP/Kristi King)
First Presbyterian Church of Ocean City accepts donations from people who want to park in the church during the fishing tournament. (WTOP/Kristi King)
A drone captures footage of Ocean City and broadcasts back to a large screen at the weigh-in dock.
A big screen at the weigh-in dock depicts images captured by a drone. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Crowds standing around for hours at the weigh in scales were occasionally entertained by the chance to catch thrown souvenirs. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Brenda Rudnicky, from the Gulf of Maine Research Institute studies some of the marlin caught during the contest to determine their ages and diet. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Brenda Rudnicky holds up an otolith, which is a fingernail-like growth found in the ears of fish that can be used to calculate the age of a fish. (WTOP/Kristi King)
A Marlin is weighed for the competition. (WTOP/Kristi King)
As fish are being lifted for weighing, before they become completely still on the line, the scale readings can vary by many pounds as fish swing or are touched by handlers. That makes for anxious moments for anglers and spectators. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Most of the qualifying fish are donated to the Md Food Bank. (WTOP/Kristi King)
The Green Turtle of Annapolis, Md. had one of the tournament’s heaviest tunas. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Anne Aramendia caught a 91 pound wahoo on the final day of the White Marlin Open; the third largest in tournament history. (WTOP/Kristi King)
(1/21)

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up