10 New Year’s resolutions that don’t involve losing weight

Top flat lay view of trendy ugly organic carrot and lemon from home garden on barn wood table, Australian grown.
Cut down on food waste  Around the world, one-third of food produced for human consumption gets wasted each year (about 1.3 billion tons). And in the U.S., $218 billion is spent growing, processing and transporting food that is never eaten. Food waste has serious environmental, economical and societal consequences, but change can start in your own kitchen. Use vegetable tops and stems for stocks, sauces and salads. Instead of tossing odds and ends, freeze them for future use. Use common sense with sell-by and expiration dates, and don’t overlook the imperfect produce. These are just a few simple steps you can take at home to cut down on food waste. “It’s a small contribution, but if everyone did it, it would be really wonderful,” Gabriella Gershenson, food and features editor with Every Day with Rachael Ray, told WTOP in an earlier interview on the subject. More resources: 6 ways to reduce food waste at home How to stop wasting food (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/moisseyev)
A Young Woman Holding a Full Frame Camera.
Learn a new creative skill  Make 2017 the year you learn a new skill — whether it’s sewing, pottery, woodworking or weaving. The Lemon Bowl hosts several “how to” classes a week on everything from terrarium making to hair braiding. D.C.’s Typecase Industries teaches letterpress in its workshops and Washington Studio School teaches drawing, painting and sculpture. There are ballet classes for adults, writing workshops, language schools and photography lessons. The options are endless. (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/marcoscisetti)
White desktop computer in new modern office
Get organized  If clutter is what’s keeping you down, resolve to get organized in the new year. Not sure where to start? Expert organizer and best-selling author of “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” Marie Kondo goes by category, starting with clothes and books, then papers and miscellaneous items. When it comes to keeping or ditching an item, she says to ask yourself a simple question: “Does it spark joy?” If the answer is “no,” it’s time to part ways. (Thinkstock)     (Getty Images/iStockphoto/KatarzynaBialasiewicz)
FILE - This July 27, 2015 file photo, shows lamb chops with warm Caesar salad in Concord, N.H. This dish is from a recipe by Sara Moulton. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)
Learn how to cook  If getting healthy is on your 2017 to-do list, learning how to cook is one way to tackle the task. In addition to trimming your wasteline, not relying on a recipe (or takeout menu) for every meal can also help to trim your spending. Learn the ins-and-outs of the kitchen with in-person classes and online classes, or get the basics from books. (AP Photo) (AP/Matthew Mead)
This 2014 photo shows Sunrise Beach in Koh Phangan, Thailand. Thailand's beaches and islands are beautiful and relaxing, with a vibrant party scene, and make an exotic alternative to more traditional spring break destinations for adventurous travelers. (AP Photo/Mairead Flynn)
Travel  Resolve to see new sights in the new year. Need some inspiration? Forbes recently released its 21 best budget travel destinations for 2017; Travel + Leisure has a list of the 50 best places to travel in 2017; and Lonely Planet has its selection of sites, cities and trends for 2017. (AP Photo) (AP/Mairead Flynn)
Go green  It’s the little things that can add up to big change. Swap out conventional cleaners for more environmentally friendly cleaners; ditch the plastic bags at lunch and switch to reusable sandwich bags; and leave the car at home and bike to work. When you’re out to eat, sip your drink sans a plastic straw. At home, use a cast iron instead of a nonstick-coated pan, and replace old light bulbs with energy-saving LED lights. Being more eco-conscious is a great resolution for a new year. (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/Jupiterimages)
This February 2014 photo shows a traditional Korean dinner of bibimbap, a dish made of rice, sliced beef, vegetables and chilies, accompanied by several smaller plates of pickles and kimchi in Seoul, Korea. Seoul’s hyper-efficient capital draws visitors with its exquisite restaurants, historic palaces and ultramodern infrastructure. (AP Photo/Amir Bibawy).
Try new foods  Why resolve to limit the foods you eat come Jan. 1? Pledge to expand your palate by trying an unfamiliar food or cuisine each month. New to chia seeds? Throw the omega-3-packed superfood into a smoothie. Like to snack? Swap salty chips for seaweed. Try Balkan food instead of the usual Italian, or go out for Korean instead of Chinese. You may discover a favorite new flavor when you’re more adventurous with food. (AP Photo) (AP/Amir Bibawy)
Georgia Thanksgiving
Volunteer Don’t put it off any longer: The start of a new year is a great time to commit to help others in your community. Whether you can lend several days a week, or only an hour a week, there are a number of organizations out there that would gladly accept your time. (AP Photo) (AP)
To save money, start small. (Getty Images/moodboard RF/moodboard)
Get in financial shape  Cut up the credit card and open up the IRA: It’s time to whip your finances into shape. WTOP’s financial contributor Barry Glassman has advice on everything from the best 401k plans to the top ways to save for college. Her Wealth’s Dawn Doebler also provides financial guidance on wtop.com. (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/moodboard RF/moodboard)
Closeup hand open book for reading concept background
Read  Trade in your nightly TV time for quality reading time and make this year the year that you actually read all those books on the best-seller list. Critics at The Washington Post and The New York Times have suggestions for your literary lineup. (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/Avosb)
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Top flat lay view of trendy ugly organic carrot and lemon from home garden on barn wood table, Australian grown.
A Young Woman Holding a Full Frame Camera.
White desktop computer in new modern office
FILE - This July 27, 2015 file photo, shows lamb chops with warm Caesar salad in Concord, N.H. This dish is from a recipe by Sara Moulton. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)
This 2014 photo shows Sunrise Beach in Koh Phangan, Thailand. Thailand's beaches and islands are beautiful and relaxing, with a vibrant party scene, and make an exotic alternative to more traditional spring break destinations for adventurous travelers. (AP Photo/Mairead Flynn)
This February 2014 photo shows a traditional Korean dinner of bibimbap, a dish made of rice, sliced beef, vegetables and chilies, accompanied by several smaller plates of pickles and kimchi in Seoul, Korea. Seoul’s hyper-efficient capital draws visitors with its exquisite restaurants, historic palaces and ultramodern infrastructure. (AP Photo/Amir Bibawy).
Georgia Thanksgiving
To save money, start small. (Getty Images/moodboard RF/moodboard)
Closeup hand open book for reading concept background

WASHINGTON — Forget the typical New Year’s resolution of more time on the treadmill and fewer calories on the plate.

This year, resolve to do something other than obsess over your weight. From cutting down on food waste to cutting up the dance floor, here are 10 resolutions you can get excited to set.

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