Top 10 trends in wine

This June 2, 2014 photo shows from left to right, Domaine De Fontsainte, Scalabrone and Chateau Viranel rose wines in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)
Rosé is not going away — and it’s not just for summer Michael Warner, co-founder and chief operating officer at DCanter Wine, expected to see rosé’s popularity peak, but the opposite has happened.  “More and more consumers are getting into rosé, and it’s not really going away,” he said.  Diane Gross, owner and wine director at Cork Wine Bar and Cork Market is seeing a similar progression. “People are just devouring it at record speeds,” she said.  One reason for its following? Gross says rosé resonates with the masses. It’s fuller than a white, but lighter than a red, making it easy to drink. And there’s good news for fans: Rosé is no longer considered just a summer wine. “I’d say if there is a trend, it’s that the growth is shifting away from just the summer months, and rosé will take on more of a year-round appeal,” Warner said. “It kind of works with everything.” (AP/Matthew Mead) (AP/Matthew Mead)
Virginia-produced wines will be discounted at certain stores this month for Virginia Wine Month.  (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack)
Lighter reds are in Gross says it’s rare to have a customer come in and ask for a California cabernet these days. Modern drinkers are all about lighter-body reds, such as beaujolais, barbera and mencia.  “Things that have a lot of cherry and cranberry and earthy notes, and have a lot of distinction, but not fruit-forward,” Gross said.  (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Dave Kolpack) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Dave Kolpack)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - FEBRUARY 22:  Riedel Wine Glass on the display at Wine Spectator Wine Seminar "Blending The Rules" Featuring JUSTIN & Landmark Vineyards during the 2015 Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival presented by FOOD & WINE at the Miami Beach Convention Center on February 22, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida.  (Photo by Carlos Barrios/Getty Images For SOBEWFF)
High praise for low-alcohol wines  In addition to seeking out light-body wines, consumers are also interested in wines with lower levels of alcohol. “The days of those big, powerful fruit bombs with alcohol levels that match are numbered, as younger drinkers seek out more balanced wine,” Warner said.  Winemakers in cooler climates, particularly in Europe, are driving this trend, as are “young, hip” winemakers in California, who are part of the movement In Pursuit of Balance, Warner explains. “That’s going for more nuanced wines that are a little higher in acidity, a little lower in alcohol and a little more complex with their flavor profile.” (Getty Images/Carlos Barrios) (Getty Images For SBWFF/Carlos Barrios)
Carrington King labels a bottle of champagne in the tank room at the King Family Vineyards on Wednesday, May 7, 2008, in Crozet, Va.  Carrington's father, David King, is the owner of King Family Vineyards and the board chairman of the state-run Virginia Wine Distribution Co. The nonprofit distribution company retains the three-tier system used by a majority of states following the repeal of Prohibition in 1933 that takes the wine from the winery to the wholesaler to the retailer. (AP Photo/Lisa Billings)
Small production is big  The big brands have their place in the industry, but today’s wine consumers are on the hunt for smaller makers.   “People are seeking out more boutique, smaller production,” said Cork’s Gross. “More people are talking about how wine is made; they want something more traditional, more reflective of the varietal.”  In Italy, smaller wineries in Sicily are gaining momentum. In Spain, winemakers in Montsant, Monterey and Conca de Barberà are making a name for themselves.  (AP/LISA BILLINGS) (AP/LISA BILLINGS)
Barboursville Vineyards in Barboursville, Va., is seen on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2007. Wines from vintners in Virginia are drawing favorable attention and holding their own against products from more established regions, which has led the state to focus on growing wine tourism. (AP Photo/Michael Felberbaum)
Beyond Bordeaux: Emerging wine regions  Bordeaux and Napa Valley are no longer the dominant wine regions. These days, reputable wines are being made all over the U.S. — and the world. Warner says New York is one state that has been making wine for a while and is now seeing the benefits. “Their cabernet francs and their rieslings are really coming into their own, and they’re gaining a lot of acceptance,” he said.  Virginia is another state to watch. He says some of the wineries that are reaching 10- and 15-year anniversaries in the Commonwealth have figured out their terroir and what works on their properties.  (AP/Michael Felberbaum) (AP/Michael Felberbaum)
YORK, ENGLAND - AUGUST 18: Champagne cools in the fridge as the champagne garden prepares for Ladies Day at York racecourse on August 18, 2016 in York, England. (Photo by Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images)
Warmer whites, cooler reds  Chances are, you’re drinking your whites too cold and your reds too warm. Jason Dodge, director of winemaking at Robert Mondavi Private Selection says if you’re drinking white, take it out of the fridge about 30 minutes before serving it. And if you’re pouring red, put it in the fridge 30 minutes ahead of time to reach what the experts call “cellar temperature.” (Getty Images/Alan Crowhurst) (Getty Images/Alan Crowhurst)
In this Wednesday, May 27, 2015 photo, oak barrels imported from France are stored in a barrel room, where produced wines are aged for at least 6 months, at the Gianaclis winery, one of Egypt's main wineries, in the Nile Delta, north of Cairo, Egypt. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
New ways to age  This summer, Robert Mondavi celebrated its 50th anniversary, and Dodge says he’s looking forward and thinking of ways to take its wines to the next level. One way he’s doing this is by aging the famed Napa Valley winery’s cabernet in bourbon barrels. “It’s really just about the flavor and the aromatic nuances that come from the barrel,” Dodge said.  “If you think about bourbon, it’s kind of dark and it’s kind of spicy and it has a hint of smoke, and lots of caramels and vanillas. Well it’s doing the same thing in the wine,” he said.  (AP Photo/Mosa’ab Elshamy) (AP/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
SANTA CRUZ, CHILE - MARCH 12:  A worker checks the quality of a wine as the Montgras winery continues to operate after the recent earthquake damaged its facility on March 12, 2010 in Santa Cruz, Chile. The winery is working at about 80 percent of capacity due to the damage. The quake caused damage to the heart of the country's largest wine production areas causing substantial damage in areas including the Cachapoal, Colchagu, Curico and Maule valleys.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Natural wines  The phrase “natural” is big right now in the wine world, but Warner and Gross say that buzzword means different things to different people. “What that means for me is that people are making wine traditionally. They’re not adding things, they’re not manipulating the wine; they’re sort of letting the grape make the wine,” Gross said.  Warner explains there’s no legal definition of “natural” wine, “But we are definitely seeing a lot of consumers asking questions about where the wines are made, how they’re made, looking for wines that come from vineyards that have been organically or biodynamically farmed.” (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Joe Raedle)
Interior of King & Godfree, one of Australia's oldest licensed grocery stores in Lygon Street, Melbourne, Australia, on February 29, 2012, Australia.(AP Photo/Mal Fairclough)
Get more for less  There’s no need to drop a lot of money. These days, $10, $15 and $20 is all it takes to get a great bottle. Warner credits this to the advances in wine education. “We’re just seeing the benefits of really great university systems investing in wine technology and wine knowledge,” he said.  “There’s a lot of understanding of how grapes grow and how wine is made, blending techniques, so I think there are a lot more winemakers who are equipped with the knowledge and the tools to make some really great wine at affordable prices.”  (AP/Mal Fairclough) (AP/Mal Fairclough)
MIAMI, FL - JUNE 06:  Monica De Abreu tastes a white wine as she decides which wines to purchase from a salesman at Global Liquors store on June 6, 2011 in Miami, Florida. Reports indicate that for the first time, the U.S. consumed more wine than France in 2010. The French still drink far more wine per capita than Americans, but the United States, which has a much larger population, has more people pouring a glass of wine.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Personalizing the palate Warner says the millennial generation is not satisfied with walking into a store and making a selection from hundreds of bottles. Instead, customers want store owners who can personalize selections to their palates. In recent years, wine clubs and boutique shops have catered to this demand.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Joe Raedle)
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This June 2, 2014 photo shows from left to right, Domaine De Fontsainte, Scalabrone and Chateau Viranel rose wines in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)
Virginia-produced wines will be discounted at certain stores this month for Virginia Wine Month.  (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - FEBRUARY 22:  Riedel Wine Glass on the display at Wine Spectator Wine Seminar "Blending The Rules" Featuring JUSTIN & Landmark Vineyards during the 2015 Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival presented by FOOD & WINE at the Miami Beach Convention Center on February 22, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida.  (Photo by Carlos Barrios/Getty Images For SOBEWFF)
Carrington King labels a bottle of champagne in the tank room at the King Family Vineyards on Wednesday, May 7, 2008, in Crozet, Va.  Carrington's father, David King, is the owner of King Family Vineyards and the board chairman of the state-run Virginia Wine Distribution Co. The nonprofit distribution company retains the three-tier system used by a majority of states following the repeal of Prohibition in 1933 that takes the wine from the winery to the wholesaler to the retailer. (AP Photo/Lisa Billings)
Barboursville Vineyards in Barboursville, Va., is seen on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2007. Wines from vintners in Virginia are drawing favorable attention and holding their own against products from more established regions, which has led the state to focus on growing wine tourism. (AP Photo/Michael Felberbaum)
YORK, ENGLAND - AUGUST 18: Champagne cools in the fridge as the champagne garden prepares for Ladies Day at York racecourse on August 18, 2016 in York, England. (Photo by Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images)
In this Wednesday, May 27, 2015 photo, oak barrels imported from France are stored in a barrel room, where produced wines are aged for at least 6 months, at the Gianaclis winery, one of Egypt's main wineries, in the Nile Delta, north of Cairo, Egypt. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
SANTA CRUZ, CHILE - MARCH 12:  A worker checks the quality of a wine as the Montgras winery continues to operate after the recent earthquake damaged its facility on March 12, 2010 in Santa Cruz, Chile. The winery is working at about 80 percent of capacity due to the damage. The quake caused damage to the heart of the country's largest wine production areas causing substantial damage in areas including the Cachapoal, Colchagu, Curico and Maule valleys.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Interior of King & Godfree, one of Australia's oldest licensed grocery stores in Lygon Street, Melbourne, Australia, on February 29, 2012, Australia.(AP Photo/Mal Fairclough)
MIAMI, FL - JUNE 06:  Monica De Abreu tastes a white wine as she decides which wines to purchase from a salesman at Global Liquors store on June 6, 2011 in Miami, Florida. Reports indicate that for the first time, the U.S. consumed more wine than France in 2010. The French still drink far more wine per capita than Americans, but the United States, which has a much larger population, has more people pouring a glass of wine.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — Whether it’s poured from a can, box or a bottle, one thing is for sure: Americans are consuming more wine than ever before. 

In 1960, the U.S. drank a total of 163 million gallons of wine. By 2015, that number jumped to 913 million gallons.

Most are enjoying their pinot alongside a plate of cheese or a slice of pizza, but wine is succeeding in sectors beyond the food and beverage industry. With more than 8,300 wineries scattered throughout the U.S., it’s making significant contributions to tourism and agriculture.

The world of wine is constantly evolving and innovating — after all, it has been around for thousands of years — and there has never been a more exciting time than now. Three of the industry’s leading experts uncork the latest trends they’re seeing — from the vine to the glass.

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