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In Annapolis, a homeless graphic artist makes his art show premiere

In a Jan. 11, 2019 photo, Lee Madison, an Annapolis graphic artist, shows some of his artwork while sitting in his usual spot at a Starbucks in Annapolis. Madison, who is homeless, creates all of his colorful multilayered artwork, using only an iPhone. (Thalia Juarez/The Baltimore Sun via AP)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — If Lee Madison wants to show you his art, he has to take out his phone. This weekend will be the first time he doesn’t have to.

Madison’s graphic design pieces will be part of the Evangelical Presbyterian Church of Annapolis Art Show and Coffee House display on March 24.

This is the first year the church is putting on the show, which aims to raise awareness of human trafficking. Artwork from the congregation and community will be displayed and there will be live music, a coffee bar and a presentation on the local fight against human trafficking.

Madison has become part of the church community through the county’s winter relief program. He opened up to The Capital in January about being homeless and struggling with addiction for decades. Graphic art has become his escape from reality, as he uses a few free apps on his iPhone to create other worlds.

One of the pieces that will be on display at the church is a colorful scene of Charlie Chaplin on the streets of Annapolis with the Maryland Statehouse in the background.

Another artist featured in the show is Larry Fransen, whose moving sculptures have been shown at galleries in Annapolis, Baltimore, Virginia, Florida and South Korea.

Fransen said that after getting to know Madison through the winter relief program, he was impressed with his work.

“He does all his art on his smartphone, it’s amazing . . . that he’s able to construct really wonderful pictures,” Fransen said.

Madison said he’s excited to see his work enlarged and displayed.

“I’m interested in going down the avenue that I have not gone down before. The cause is great too, we can’t forget about that,” he said.

The winter relief program Madison has been getting food and a warm place to sleep through ends in two weeks. He’s not sure what he’ll do when it’s over.

“I’m kind of dreading that day,” he said. “I’m not quite sure what happens after that.”

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Information from: The Capital, http://www.capitalgazette.com/

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