How to help victims of Florence

Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten "Survivor" are rescued from floodwaters after Hurricane Florence dumped several inches of rain in the area overnight, Friday, Sept. 14, 2018 in New Bern, N.C.  (Andrew Carter/The News & Observer via AP)
Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten “Survivor” are rescued from floodwaters after Hurricane Florence dumped several inches of rain in the area overnight, Friday, Sept. 14, 2018 in New Bern, N.C. (Andrew Carter/The News & Observer via AP) (AP/Andrew Carter)
Craig Camara
Craig Camara, a volunteer North Shore Animal League, holds a puppy that was rescued from a shelter in one of the three states in the path of Hurricane Florence, Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018 in Port Washington, N.Y. (AP Photo/Julie Walker) (AP/Julie Walker)
Susan Hedgepeth is assisted along with her dog Cooper by members of the U.S. Coast Guard in Lumberton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, following flooding from Hurricane Florence. Hedgepeth was moved to higher ground. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Susan Hedgepeth is assisted along with her dog Cooper by members of the U.S. Coast Guard in Lumberton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, following flooding from Hurricane Florence. Hedgepeth was moved to higher ground. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome) (AP/Gerry Broome)
Susan Hedgepeth is assisted along with her dog Cooper by members of the U.S. Coast Guard in Lumberton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, following flooding from Hurricane Florence. Hedgepeth was moved to higher ground. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Susan Hedgepeth is assisted along with her dog Cooper by members of the U.S. Coast Guard in Lumberton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, following flooding from Hurricane Florence. Hedgepeth was moved to higher ground. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome) (AP/Gerry Broome)
Rescue team member Sgt. Nick Muhar, from the North Carolina National Guard 1/120th battalion, evacuates a young child as the rising floodwaters from Hurricane Florence threatens his home in New Bern, N.C., on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Seward)
Rescue team member Sgt. Nick Muhar, from the North Carolina National Guard 1/120th battalion, evacuates a young child as the rising floodwaters from Hurricane Florence threatens his home in New Bern, N.C., on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Seward) (AP/Chris Seward)
Jody Jones kisses his pit bull Emma along Nine Foot Road in Newport, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, after sharing a meal with her. Jones lost everything after his home was destroyed by Hurricane Florence. (Robert Willett/The News & Observer via AP)
Jody Jones kisses his pit bull Emma along Nine Foot Road in Newport, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, after sharing a meal with her. Jones lost everything after his home was destroyed by Hurricane Florence. (Robert Willett/The News & Observer via AP) (AP/Robert Willett)
Members of the Nebraska Task Force 1 urban search and rescue team help load an elderly resident onto a bus as they evacuate an assisted living facility to a church as a precaution against potential flooding the city could see from tropical storm Florence in Fayetteville, N.C., Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Members of the Nebraska Task Force 1 urban search and rescue team help load an elderly resident onto a bus as they evacuate an assisted living facility to a church as a precaution against potential flooding the city could see from tropical storm Florence in Fayetteville, N.C., Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman) (AP/David Goldman)
Joanna Faulkner, Kayla Faulkner
Joanna Faulkner carries her daughter Kayla, 3, out of a high water vehicle after being evacuated by the police when her neighborhood began to flood as Florence continues to dump heavy rain in Fayetteville, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman) (AP/David Goldman)
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Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten "Survivor" are rescued from floodwaters after Hurricane Florence dumped several inches of rain in the area overnight, Friday, Sept. 14, 2018 in New Bern, N.C.  (Andrew Carter/The News & Observer via AP)
Craig Camara
Susan Hedgepeth is assisted along with her dog Cooper by members of the U.S. Coast Guard in Lumberton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, following flooding from Hurricane Florence. Hedgepeth was moved to higher ground. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Susan Hedgepeth is assisted along with her dog Cooper by members of the U.S. Coast Guard in Lumberton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, following flooding from Hurricane Florence. Hedgepeth was moved to higher ground. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Rescue team member Sgt. Nick Muhar, from the North Carolina National Guard 1/120th battalion, evacuates a young child as the rising floodwaters from Hurricane Florence threatens his home in New Bern, N.C., on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Seward)
Jody Jones kisses his pit bull Emma along Nine Foot Road in Newport, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, after sharing a meal with her. Jones lost everything after his home was destroyed by Hurricane Florence. (Robert Willett/The News & Observer via AP)
Members of the Nebraska Task Force 1 urban search and rescue team help load an elderly resident onto a bus as they evacuate an assisted living facility to a church as a precaution against potential flooding the city could see from tropical storm Florence in Fayetteville, N.C., Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Joanna Faulkner, Kayla Faulkner

WASHINGTON — Florence’s impacts have proved a flood disaster for much of the Carolinas. As thousands are displaced by rising floodwaters, here are a few ways that WTOP readers and listeners can help:

In D.C., the Humane Rescue Alliance said it is preparing for the aftermath of Florence and is asking those thinking of adopting an animal to do so now so that they can make room for pets displaced by the storm.

Virginia-based BRAWS (Bringing Resources to Aid Women’s Shelters) is seeking donations to help disaster victims.

Virginia and D.C.-based Soles4Souls is seeking shoe and clothing donations at its Northern Virginia donation center.

The Red Cross has been preparing for the fallout from Florence and has more than 1,500 of its workers are in North Carolina and more volunteers are being mobilized to aid the approximate 100,000 people that may need emergency shelter during and after Florence.

Walmart, Sam’s Center and Target have thousands of trucks carrying millions of bottles of water to supply store shelves that have run dry this week.

Walmart also says extra trucks carrying batteries and generators are already loaded and on their way to areas expected to be devastated by Florence’s impact.

The United Way has set up a donation site to get funds to those affected by Florence. It says that 100 percent of individual donations given will be distributed to the affected areas.

The Salvation Army is in areas hammered by Florence and is providing emergency assistance to survivors and first responders. Those wishing to donate can do so on the Salvation Army website.

At least 17 people have been confirmed dead as Florence — now a tropical depression — hovers over the Carolinas and pelts the area with record-breaking rainfall.

“Not only are you going to see more impact across North Carolina … but we’re also anticipating you are about to see a lot of damage going through West Virginia, all the way up to Ohio as the system exits out,” Brock Long of the Federal Emergency Management Agency said Sunday on Fox News.

Flash flood watches have been issued for regions of the D.C. area as the storm and its rains move northward.

Rescue teams from Virginia and Maryland have headed to affected areas to assist in rescue operations.

Maryland’s Helicopter Aquatic Rescue Team, or HART, has been activated to help people stranded by floodwaters from Florence.

The team consists of 11 members of the guard and four team members from rescue teams in Montgomery, Harford, Baltimore and Howard counties. Kohler said they were all headed to Raleigh, North Carolina, on Sunday, where two National Guard helicopters will be used for rescues, according to Kohler.

WTOP’s John Domen and The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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