After 10 days, Father Hurley Boulevard reopens to morning commuters

The sinkhole was caused by a pipe that was designed to take rainwater to a nearby creek failed due to rust. (WTOP/Ralph Fox)
The sinkhole was caused by a pipe that was designed to take rainwater to a nearby creek failed due to rust. (WTOP/Ralph Fox) (WTOP/Ralph Fox)
Repair workers are filling the hole with rock for now. (WTOP/Ralph Fox)
Repair workers initially filled the hole with rock. (WTOP/Ralph Fox) (WTOP/Ralph Fox)
A sinkhole has caused headaches for drivers and repair workers alike in Germantown, Maryland, on Sunday, and some workers on the field say it may take weeks to fix the source of the problem. (WTOP/Ralph Fox)
A sinkhole caused headaches for drivers and repair workers alike in Germantown, Maryland, on Sunday, and some workers on the field said it may take weeks to fix the source of the problem. It took 10 days to repair. (WTOP/Ralph Fox) (WTOP Ralph Fox)
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The sinkhole was caused by a pipe that was designed to take rainwater to a nearby creek failed due to rust. (WTOP/Ralph Fox)
Repair workers are filling the hole with rock for now. (WTOP/Ralph Fox)
A sinkhole has caused headaches for drivers and repair workers alike in Germantown, Maryland, on Sunday, and some workers on the field say it may take weeks to fix the source of the problem. (WTOP/Ralph Fox)

GERMANTOWN, Md. — Father Hurley Boulevard, a major commuter route in Montgomery County, is again open to traffic in both directions, after being closed for 10 days because of a sinkhole.

On July 22, a 38-year-old piece of a rusted metal culvert under the road surface failed, after heavy rains in the previous days, opening a sinkhole in the southbound lanes between Beaconfield Terrace and Wynnfield Drive.

Since the culvert carried water under both lanes of Father Hurley Boulevard, the entire road was closed between Middlebrook Road and Crystal Rock Drive, which is located near the entrance and exit ramps of Interstate 270.

After 10 days of commuters having to choose alternative routes, repairs were completed Wednesday evening.

 

Bruce Johnston, chief of the division for the Montgomery County Department of Transportation, told WTOP gravel was placed into the sinkhole. Eventually crews drilled down to the damaged pipe and pumped concrete into the open space to fill it.

Johnston said a permanent solution for stormwater underneath Father Hurley Boulevard is expected to be completed in the coming months.


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