Today in History: Oct. 19

1781:  Lord Charles Cornwallis and the British surrendering to General Washington at York Town (Yorktown) Virginia. The surrender effectively ended the American War of Independence.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
In 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Virginia, as the American Revolution neared its end. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Hulton Archive)
FILE - In this 1960 file photo, Cuba's revolutionary hero Ernesto "Che" Guevara, center, Cuba's leader Fidel Castro, left, and Cuba's President Osvaldo Dorticos, right, attend a reception in an unknown location in Cuba. Former President Fidel Castro, who led a rebel army to improbable victory in Cuba, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of 10 U.S. presidents during his half century rule, has died at age 90. The bearded revolutionary, who survived a crippling U.S. trade embargo as well as dozens, possibly hundreds, of assassination plots, died eight years after ill health forced him to formally hand power over to his younger brother Raul, who announced his death late Friday, Nov. 25, 2016, on state television. (Prensa Latina via AP Images, File)
In 1960, the United States began a limited embargo against Cuba covering all commodities except medical supplies and certain food products. In this 1960 file photo, Cuba’s revolutionary hero Ernesto “Che” Guevara, center, Cuba’s leader Fidel Castro, left, and Cuba’s President Osvaldo Dorticos, right, attend a reception in an unknown location in Cuba. (Prensa Latina via AP Images, File) (AP/Anonymous)
A British Airways supersonic Concorde airliner takes off from London's Heathrow Airport at 10:29 gmt, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 1977 on its inaugural scheduled passenger flight to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport. The aircraft filled with 100 passengers, set a record crossing of 3 hours 23 minutes. (AP Photo)
In 1977, the supersonic Concorde made its first landing in New York City. Here, a British Airways supersonic Concorde airliner takes off from London’s Heathrow Airport on Nov. 22, 1977 on its inaugural scheduled passenger flight to New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport. (AP Photo) (AP)
John DeLorean
In 1982, automaker John Z. DeLorean was arrested by federal agents in Los Angeles, accused of conspiring to sell $24 million of cocaine to salvage his business. FILE – This December 1987 file photo shows automaker John DeLorean. A federal court in New Jersey dismissed a lawsuit brought by Sally DeLorean, the widow of automaker John DeLorean, over royalties stemming from the “Back to the Future” movies. (AP Photos/File) (AP)
FILE - In this Oct. 19, 1987, file photo, traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. What if the stock market plunged 20 percent tomorrow? The question may seem absurd when the market is in the midst of one of its calmest runs in history and at record highs. But it's what investors had to deal with 30 years ago, when "Black Monday" blasted stocks on Oct. 19, 1987. (AP Photo/Peter Morgan, File)
On Oct. 19, 1987, the stock market crashed as the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 508 points, or 22.6 percent in value (its biggest daily percentage loss), to close at 1,738.74 in what came to be known as “Black Monday.” In this Oct. 19, 1987, file photo, traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. (AP Photo/Peter Morgan, File) (AP/Peter Morgan)
**FILE**  Former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein reacts in court while listening to the prosecution, during the Anfal genocide trial in Baghdad, Iraq, in this Dec. 21, 2006 file photo.  Some Arab media are reporting, Saturday morning, Dec. 30, 2006, that Saddam Hussein has been executed. The Associated Press is seeking confirmation. (AP Photo / Nikola Solic, pool, file)
In 2005, a defiant Saddam Hussein pleaded innocent to charges of premeditated murder and torture as his trial opened under heavy security in the former headquarters of his Baath Party in Baghdad. Former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein reacts in court while listening to the prosecution, during the Anfal genocide trial in Baghdad, Iraq, in this Dec. 21, 2006 file photo. Some Arab media are reporting, Saturday morning, Dec. 30, 2006, that Saddam Hussein has been executed. The Associated Press is seeking confirmation. (AP Photo / Nikola Solic, pool, file) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/NIKOLA SOLIC)
Colin Powell
In 2008, retired Gen. Colin Powell, a Republican who was President George W. Bush’s first secretary of state, broke with the party and endorsed Democrat Barack Obama for president, calling him a “transformational figure” during an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” In this photo taken Nov. 9, 2011, Former Secretary of State Colin Powell speaks in New York. In a leaked 2015 email exchange, former Secretary of State Colin Powell discussed Israel’s nuclear weapons with a friend, saying the country has 200 warheads. (AP Photo/Eric Reichbaum) (AP)
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1781:  Lord Charles Cornwallis and the British surrendering to General Washington at York Town (Yorktown) Virginia. The surrender effectively ended the American War of Independence.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
FILE - In this 1960 file photo, Cuba's revolutionary hero Ernesto "Che" Guevara, center, Cuba's leader Fidel Castro, left, and Cuba's President Osvaldo Dorticos, right, attend a reception in an unknown location in Cuba. Former President Fidel Castro, who led a rebel army to improbable victory in Cuba, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of 10 U.S. presidents during his half century rule, has died at age 90. The bearded revolutionary, who survived a crippling U.S. trade embargo as well as dozens, possibly hundreds, of assassination plots, died eight years after ill health forced him to formally hand power over to his younger brother Raul, who announced his death late Friday, Nov. 25, 2016, on state television. (Prensa Latina via AP Images, File)
A British Airways supersonic Concorde airliner takes off from London's Heathrow Airport at 10:29 gmt, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 1977 on its inaugural scheduled passenger flight to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport. The aircraft filled with 100 passengers, set a record crossing of 3 hours 23 minutes. (AP Photo)
John DeLorean
FILE - In this Oct. 19, 1987, file photo, traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. What if the stock market plunged 20 percent tomorrow? The question may seem absurd when the market is in the midst of one of its calmest runs in history and at record highs. But it's what investors had to deal with 30 years ago, when "Black Monday" blasted stocks on Oct. 19, 1987. (AP Photo/Peter Morgan, File)
**FILE**  Former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein reacts in court while listening to the prosecution, during the Anfal genocide trial in Baghdad, Iraq, in this Dec. 21, 2006 file photo.  Some Arab media are reporting, Saturday morning, Dec. 30, 2006, that Saddam Hussein has been executed. The Associated Press is seeking confirmation. (AP Photo / Nikola Solic, pool, file)
Colin Powell

Today is Saturday, Oct. 19, the 292nd day of 2019. There are 73 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 19, 1987, the stock market crashed as the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 508 points, or 22.6 percent in value (its biggest daily percentage loss), to close at 1,738.74 in what came to be known as “Black Monday.”

On this date:

In 1765, the Stamp Act Congress, meeting in New York, adopted a declaration of rights and liberties which the British Parliament ignored.

In 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Virginia, as the American Revolution neared its end.

In 1814, the first documented public performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” took place at the Holliday Street Theater in Baltimore.

In 1944, the U.S. Navy began accepting black women into WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service).

In 1960, the United States began a limited embargo against Cuba covering all commodities except medical supplies and certain food products.

In 1977, the supersonic Concorde made its first landing in New York City.

In 1982, automaker John Z. DeLorean was arrested by federal agents in Los Angeles, accused of conspiring to sell $24 million of cocaine to salvage his business. (DeLorean was acquitted at trial on grounds of entrapment.)

In 1994, 22 people were killed as a terrorist bomb shattered a bus in the heart of Tel Aviv’s shopping district.

In 2001, U.S. special forces began operations on the ground in Afghanistan, opening a significant new phase of the assault against the Taliban and al-Qaida.

In 2005, a defiant Saddam Hussein pleaded innocent to charges of premeditated murder and torture as his trial opened under heavy security in the former headquarters of his Baath Party in Baghdad.

In 2008, retired Gen. Colin Powell, a Republican who was President George W. Bush’s first secretary of state, broke with the party and endorsed Democrat Barack Obama for president, calling him a “transformational figure” during an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

In 2017, Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello, meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House about a month after Hurricane Maria, described the situation in the island territory as “catastrophic”; Trump rated the White House response to the disaster as a “10.”

Ten years ago: The Justice Department issued a new policy memo, telling prosecutors that pot-smoking patients or their sanctioned suppliers should not be targeted for federal prosecution in states that allowed medical marijuana. Actor Joseph Wiseman, 91, who played the sinister Dr. No in the first James Bond feature film, died in New York City. Mass killer Howard Unruh, who took 13 lives during a 1949 rampage in Camden, New Jersey, died in a Trenton nursing facility at age 88.

Five years ago: Pope Francis beatified Pope Paul VI, concluding a remarkable meeting of bishops debating family issues that drew parallels to the tumultuous reforms of the Second Vatican Council which Paul oversaw and implemented. An Associated Press investigation found that dozens of Nazis war criminals and SS guards had collected millions in U.S. Social Security pension payments after being forced out of the United States. Peyton Manning broke Brett Favre’s NFL record of 508 touchdown career passes as he threw four TD passes in Denver’s 42-17 victory over the San Francisco 49ers.

One year ago: In the first federal case alleging foreign interference in the 2018 midterm elections, U.S. authorities accused a Russian woman of helping oversee the finances of a sweeping effort to sway American public opinion through social media. On the same day, U.S. intelligence agencies asserted that Russia, China, Iran and other countries were engaged in continuous efforts to influence American policy and voters in the upcoming elections and beyond. A speeding train ran over a crowd watching fireworks during a religious festival in northern India, killing at least 60 people. No ticket matched all six numbers for an estimated $1 billion prize in the Mega Millions lottery drawing, sending the jackpot toward a record $1.6 billion for the next drawing four days later.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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