Today in History: Sept. 17

FILE--Former Maryland Governor and Vice President Spiro T. agnew, left, and Nelson A. Rockefeller chat between sessions abaord the liner Independence in this Oct. 19, 1967 file photo.  Agnew, an outspoken conservative who loved bashing the media before he resigned in disgrace as Richard Nixon's vice president over a tax-evasion scandal in 1973, died Tuesday Sept. 17, 1996. He was 77. (AP Photo/File)
In 1996, Former Vice President Spiro T. Agnew died in Berlin, Maryland, at age 77.  (AP Photo/File) (Associated Press)
On this date in 1862, more than 3,600 men were killed in the Civil War Battle of Antietam in Maryland. (AP Photo)
In 1862, more than 3,600 men were killed in the Civil War Battle of Antietam in Maryland. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
On this date in 2011, a demonstration calling itself Occupy Wall Street began in New York, prompting similar protests around the U.S. and the world. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano)
In 2011, a demonstration calling itself Occupy Wall Street began in New York, prompting similar protests around the U.S. and the world. An elderly group leads a march up Broadway toward Police Headquarters, Friday, Sept. 30, 2011, in New York. The “Occupy Wall Street” protest is in its second week, as demonstrators speak out against corporate greed and social inequality. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Louis Lanzano)
This photo made available by the U.S. National Archives shows a portion of the first page of the United States Constitution. (National Archives via AP)
On Sept. 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States was completed and signed by a majority of delegates attending the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. This photo made available by the U.S. National Archives shows a portion of the first page of the United States Constitution. (National Archives via AP) (AP)
Allied paratroopers entering one of the huge transports before taking off on the assault on German occupied Holland during "Operation Market Garden"  Sept. 17, 1944. (AP Photo/British Official Photograph)
In 1944, during World War II, Allied paratroopers launched Operation Market Garden, landing behind German lines in the Netherlands. (After initial success, the Allies were beaten back by the Germans.) Allied paratroopers entering one of the huge transports before taking off on the assault on German occupied Holland during “Operation Market Garden” Sept. 17, 1944. (AP Photo/British Official Photograph)   (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
James V. Forrestal (right foreground) takes oath as the nation’s first secretary of defense, administered by chief justice Fred M. Vinson (center) at the navy department in Washington on Sept. 17, 1947. Witnessing the ceremony, left to right, are: Secretary of War Kenneth Royall; Army Chief of Staff Dwight D. Eisenhower; Navy Undersecretary John; Chester W. Nimitz; Undersecretary of War S. Stuart Symington and General Carl Spaatz, Air Force Chief. (AP Photo/WX)
In 1947, James V. Forrestal was sworn in as the first U.S. Secretary of Defense. James V. Forrestal (right foreground) takes oath as the nation’s first secretary of defense, administered by chief justice Fred M. Vinson (center) at the navy department in Washington on Sept. 17, 1947. Witnessing the ceremony, left to right, are: Secretary of War Kenneth Royall; Army Chief of Staff Dwight D. Eisenhower; Navy Undersecretary John; Chester W. Nimitz; Undersecretary of War S. Stuart Symington and General Carl Spaatz, Air Force Chief. (AP Photo/WX)   (ASSOCIATED PRESS/WX)
Miss America 1995 Heather Whitestone, the former Miss Alabama, walks down the runway and signs "I Love You" to the crowd after she won the 74th annual pageant in the Atlantic City Convention Hall Saturday, September 17, 1994. (AP Photo/Tom Costello)
Miss America 1995 Heather Whitestone, the former Miss Alabama, walks down the runway and signs “I Love You” to the crowd after she won the 74th annual pageant in the Atlantic City Convention Hall Saturday, September 17, 1994. (AP Photo/Tom Costello) In 1994, Heather Whitestone of Alabama was crowned the first deaf Miss America. (ASSOCIATED PRESS/TOM COSTELLO)
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FILE--Former Maryland Governor and Vice President Spiro T. agnew, left, and Nelson A. Rockefeller chat between sessions abaord the liner Independence in this Oct. 19, 1967 file photo.  Agnew, an outspoken conservative who loved bashing the media before he resigned in disgrace as Richard Nixon's vice president over a tax-evasion scandal in 1973, died Tuesday Sept. 17, 1996. He was 77. (AP Photo/File)
On this date in 1862, more than 3,600 men were killed in the Civil War Battle of Antietam in Maryland. (AP Photo)
On this date in 2011, a demonstration calling itself Occupy Wall Street began in New York, prompting similar protests around the U.S. and the world. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano)
This photo made available by the U.S. National Archives shows a portion of the first page of the United States Constitution. (National Archives via AP)
Allied paratroopers entering one of the huge transports before taking off on the assault on German occupied Holland during "Operation Market Garden"  Sept. 17, 1944. (AP Photo/British Official Photograph)
James V. Forrestal (right foreground) takes oath as the nation’s first secretary of defense, administered by chief justice Fred M. Vinson (center) at the navy department in Washington on Sept. 17, 1947. Witnessing the ceremony, left to right, are: Secretary of War Kenneth Royall; Army Chief of Staff Dwight D. Eisenhower; Navy Undersecretary John; Chester W. Nimitz; Undersecretary of War S. Stuart Symington and General Carl Spaatz, Air Force Chief. (AP Photo/WX)
Miss America 1995 Heather Whitestone, the former Miss Alabama, walks down the runway and signs "I Love You" to the crowd after she won the 74th annual pageant in the Atlantic City Convention Hall Saturday, September 17, 1994. (AP Photo/Tom Costello)

Today in History

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 17, the 260th day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Sept. 17, 1987, the city of Philadelphia, birthplace of the U.S. Constitution, threw a big party to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the historic document; in a speech at Independence Hall, President Ronald Reagan acclaimed the framing of the Constitution as a milestone “that would profoundly and forever alter not just these United States but the world.”

On this date:

In 1787, the Constitution of the United States was completed and signed by a majority of delegates attending the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

In 1862, more than 3,600 men were killed in the Civil War Battle of Antietam (an-TEE’-tum) in Maryland.

In 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland during World War II, more than two weeks after Nazi Germany had launched its assault.

In 1944, during World War II, Allied paratroopers launched Operation Market Garden, landing behind German lines in the Netherlands. (After initial success, the Allies were beaten back by the Germans.)

In 1947, James V. Forrestal was sworn in as the first U.S. Secretary of Defense.

In 1971, citing health reasons, Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black, 85, retired. (Black, who was succeeded by Lewis F. Powell Jr., died eight days after making his announcement.)

In 1978, after meeting at Camp David, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin (men-AH’-kem BAY’-gihn) and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat signed a framework for a peace treaty.

In 1994, Heather Whitestone of Alabama was crowned the first deaf Miss America.

In 1996, former Vice President Spiro T. Agnew died in Berlin, Maryland, at age 77.

In 2001, six days after 9/11, stock prices nosedived but stopped short of collapse in an emotional, flag-waving reopening of Wall Street; the Dow Jones industrial average ended the day down 684.81 at 8,920.70.

In 2004, San Francisco’s Barry Bonds hit the 700th home run of his career, joining Babe Ruth (714) and Hank Aaron (755) as the only players to reach the milestone (San Francisco beat San Diego, 4-1).

In 2011, a demonstration calling itself Occupy Wall Street began in New York, prompting similar protests around the U.S. and the world.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama abruptly canceled a long-planned missile shield for Eastern Europe, replacing a Bush-era project that was bitterly opposed by Russia with a plan he contended would better defend against a growing threat of Iranian missiles. An 18-year-old man armed with an ax, knives and Molotov cocktails attacked his high school in Ansbach, Germany, injuring nine students and a teacher before being shot and arrested. Police in New Haven, Connecticut, charged Raymond Clark III, a Yale animal lab technician, with murdering graduate student Annie Le (lay). (Clark later pleaded guilty to the killing, and was sentenced to 44 years in prison.)

Five years ago: The Republican-controlled House voted grudgingly to give the administration authority to train and arm Syrian rebels as President Barack Obama emphasized anew that American forces “do not and will not have a combat mission” in the struggle against Islamic State militants in either Iraq or Syria.

One year ago: Senate leaders, under pressure from fellow Republicans, scheduled a public hearing for the following week at which Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the woman accusing him of sexual assault decades ago would testify; the move forced Republicans to put off a committee vote on the nomination. President Donald Trump defended Kavanaugh as an “outstanding judge” but said there might need to be a “little delay” in the confirmation process. Emergency crews brought food and water to Wilmington, N.C., after the city of 120,000 people was cut off by flooding from Hurricane Florence; the death toll from the storm rose to at least 32. “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” from Amazon, became the first streaming series to win the Emmy as the top comedy series. A trade war between the U.S. and China escalated further, as President Donald Trump announced tariffs on $200 billion more in Chinese goods starting the following week.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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