Today in History: Sept. 14

On September 14, 1814, Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the poem "Defence of Fort McHenry" after witnessing the American flag flying over the Maryland fort following a night of British bombardment during the War of 1812; the poem later became the words to "The Star-Spangled Banner." This is a copy of the first published version of "The Star-Spangled Banner," one of two known to exist, acquired by the Library of Congress after it was found in an old scrapbook in the attic by Jesse Cassard of Baltimore, Md., shown on Oct. 17, 1940. (AP Photo)
In 1814, Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the poem “Defence of Fort McHenry” after witnessing the American flag flying over the Maryland fort following a night of British bombardment during the War of 1812; the poem later became the words to “The Star-Spangled Banner.” This is a copy of the first published version of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” one of two known to exist, acquired by the Library of Congress after it was found in an old scrapbook in the attic by Jesse Cassard of Baltimore, Md., shown on Oct. 17, 1940. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
FILE - In this undated file photo, William McKinley, 25th President of the United States. He was inaugurated in 1897, and again in 1901 just prior to being assassinated on Sept. 6, 1901. Even before he arrived on a historic trip to Alaska, President Barack Obama was making waves over his decision to rename its famed Mount McKinley, named for  President McKinley, as Denali, a move applauded in Alaska and derided more than 3,000 miles away in Ohio.  (AP Photo, File)
In 1901, President William McKinley died in Buffalo, New York, of gunshot wounds inflicted by an assassin; Vice President Theodore Roosevelt succeeded him. (AP Photo, File) (AP)
On this date in 1927, modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan died in Nice, France, when her scarf became entangled in a wheel of the sports car she was riding in. Duncan is shown in this undated photo. (AP Photo)
In 1927, modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan died in Nice, France, when her scarf became entangled in a wheel of the sports car she was riding in. Duncan is shown in this undated photo. (AP Photo) (AP)
On this date in 1975, Pope Paul VI declared Mother Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton the first U.S.-born saint. This portrait is a reproduction of an original tinttype owned by family friends of the Setons in Italy.  (AP Photo)
In 1975, Pope Paul VI declared Mother Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton the first U.S.-born saint. This portrait is a reproduction of an original tinttype owned by family friends of the Setons in Italy. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
On this date in 1982, Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly actress Grace Kelly, died at age 52 of injuries from a car crash the day before. Here, Kelly gives a press conference on board the liner Constitution, on April 11, 1956, during its journey from New York to France. (AP Photo)
In 1982, Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly actress Grace Kelly, died at age 52 of injuries from a car crash the day before. Here, Kelly gives a press conference on board the liner Constitution, on April 11, 1956, during its journey from New York to France. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/John Rooney)
On this date in 1985, Shiite Muslim kidnappers in Lebanon released the Rev. Benjamin Weir after holding him captive for 16 months. Here, Weir is seen on the right, with David Jacobsen (left) and Rev. Lawrence Martin Jenco.  (AP Photo/Gerald Penny)
In 1985, Shiite Muslim kidnappers in Lebanon released the Rev. Benjamin Weir after holding him captive for 16 months. Here, Weir is seen on the right, with David Jacobsen (left) and Rev. Lawrence Martin Jenco. (AP Photo/Gerald Penny) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Gerald Penny)
FILE - This Dec. 25, 1985 file photo shows the stars of the television series "The Golden Girls" during a break in taping in Hollywood, Calif. From left are, Estelle Getty, Rue McClanahan, Bea Arthur and Betty White. Family spokesman Dan Watt says 86-year-old Bea Arthur died at home early Saturday, April 25, 2009. He says Arthur had cancer, but declined to give further details. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)
In 1985, the situation comedy “The Golden Girls” premiered on NBC. This Dec. 25, 1985 file photo shows the stars during a break in taping in Hollywood, California. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Nick Ut)
FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2008, file photo, cyclists ride past debris piled up on the seawall road after Hurricane Ike hit the Texas coast in Galveston. Most municipal recovery projects in Galveston in the wake of the hurricane have been finished in the eight years since the storm battered the island. Ike made landfall in Galveston on Sept. 13, 2008. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)
In 2008, losing its devastating punch as a major hurricane, Ike nevertheless drubbed the Midwest with powerful winds and floodwaters. FILE – In this Sept. 14, 2008, file photo, cyclists ride past debris piled up on the seawall road after Hurricane Ike hit the Texas coast in Galveston. Most municipal recovery projects in Galveston in the wake of the hurricane have been finished in the eight years since the storm battered the island. Ike made landfall in Galveston on Sept. 13, 2008. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File) (AP/Matt Slocum)
(1/8)
On September 14, 1814, Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the poem "Defence of Fort McHenry" after witnessing the American flag flying over the Maryland fort following a night of British bombardment during the War of 1812; the poem later became the words to "The Star-Spangled Banner." This is a copy of the first published version of "The Star-Spangled Banner," one of two known to exist, acquired by the Library of Congress after it was found in an old scrapbook in the attic by Jesse Cassard of Baltimore, Md., shown on Oct. 17, 1940. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this undated file photo, William McKinley, 25th President of the United States. He was inaugurated in 1897, and again in 1901 just prior to being assassinated on Sept. 6, 1901. Even before he arrived on a historic trip to Alaska, President Barack Obama was making waves over his decision to rename its famed Mount McKinley, named for  President McKinley, as Denali, a move applauded in Alaska and derided more than 3,000 miles away in Ohio.  (AP Photo, File)
On this date in 1927, modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan died in Nice, France, when her scarf became entangled in a wheel of the sports car she was riding in. Duncan is shown in this undated photo. (AP Photo)
On this date in 1975, Pope Paul VI declared Mother Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton the first U.S.-born saint. This portrait is a reproduction of an original tinttype owned by family friends of the Setons in Italy.  (AP Photo)
On this date in 1982, Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly actress Grace Kelly, died at age 52 of injuries from a car crash the day before. Here, Kelly gives a press conference on board the liner Constitution, on April 11, 1956, during its journey from New York to France. (AP Photo)
On this date in 1985, Shiite Muslim kidnappers in Lebanon released the Rev. Benjamin Weir after holding him captive for 16 months. Here, Weir is seen on the right, with David Jacobsen (left) and Rev. Lawrence Martin Jenco.  (AP Photo/Gerald Penny)
FILE - This Dec. 25, 1985 file photo shows the stars of the television series "The Golden Girls" during a break in taping in Hollywood, Calif. From left are, Estelle Getty, Rue McClanahan, Bea Arthur and Betty White. Family spokesman Dan Watt says 86-year-old Bea Arthur died at home early Saturday, April 25, 2009. He says Arthur had cancer, but declined to give further details. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2008, file photo, cyclists ride past debris piled up on the seawall road after Hurricane Ike hit the Texas coast in Galveston. Most municipal recovery projects in Galveston in the wake of the hurricane have been finished in the eight years since the storm battered the island. Ike made landfall in Galveston on Sept. 13, 2008. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

Today is Saturday, Sept. 14, the 257th day of 2019. There are 108 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Sept. 14, 1814, Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the poem “Defence of Fort McHenry” (later “The Star-Spangled Banner”) after witnessing the American flag flying over the Maryland fort following a night of British naval bombardment during the War of 1812.

On this date:

In 1812, Napoleon Bonaparte’s troops entered Moscow following the Battle of Borodino to find the Russian city largely abandoned and parts set ablaze.

In 1847, during the Mexican-American War, U.S. forces under Gen. Winfield Scott took control of Mexico City.

In 1861, the first naval engagement of the Civil War took place as the USS Colorado attacked and sank the Confederate private schooner Judah off Pensacola, Florida.

In 1901, President William McKinley died in Buffalo, New York, of gunshot wounds inflicted by an assassin; Vice President Theodore Roosevelt succeeded him.

In 1927, modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan died in Nice (nees), France, when her scarf became entangled in a wheel of the sports car she was riding in.

In 1954, the Soviet Union detonated a 40-kiloton atomic test weapon.

In 1963, Mary Ann Fischer of Aberdeen, S.D., gave birth to four girls and a boy, the first known surviving quintuplets in the United States.

In 1982, Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly actress Grace Kelly, died at age 52 of injuries from a car crash the day before; Lebanon’s president-elect, Bashir Gemayel (bah-SHEER’ jeh-MAY’-el), was killed by a bomb.

In 1991, the government of South Africa, the African National Congress and the Inkatha (in-KAH’-tah) Freedom Party signed a national peace pact.

In 1994, on the 34th day of a strike by players, Acting Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig announced the 1994 season was over.

In 2001, Americans packed churches and clogged public squares on a day of remembrance for the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks. President George W. Bush prayed with his Cabinet and attended services at Washington National Cathedral, then flew to New York, where he waded into the ruins of the World Trade Center and addressed rescue workers in a flag-waving, bullhorn-wielding show of resolve.

In 2012, fury over an anti-Muslim film ridiculing the Prophet Muhammad spread across the Muslim world, with deadly clashes near Western embassies in Tunisia and Sudan, an American fast-food restaurant set ablaze in Lebanon, and international peacekeepers attacked in the Sinai.

Ten years ago: Lecturing Wall Street on its own turf, President Barack Obama warned financial leaders not to use the recovering economy to race back into “reckless behavior” that could cause a new meltdown. Death claimed “Dirty Dancing” star Patrick Swayze at 57; former White House press secretary Jody Powell at age 65; and comic character actor Henry Gibson at age 73. Roger Federer let the U.S. Open championship slip from his grasp two points from victory as sixth-seeded Juan Martin del Potro of Argentina won his first Grand Slam title by upsetting the No. 1-seeded Federer 3-6, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2.

Five years ago: North Korea’s Supreme Court sentenced Matthew Miller, a 24-year-old American, to six years with labor for entering the country illegally and trying to commit an act of espionage. (Miller was released in November 2014 along with another detained American, Kenneth Bae.) South Korean teenager Hyo-Joo Kim beat Australian veteran Karrie Webb by one shot to win the Evian Championship and become the third youngest major winner at 19 years, 2 months. Miss New York Kira Kazantsev won the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, New Jersey. (For her talent performance, Kazantsev sang Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” while sitting cross-legged on the stage and banging a red plastic cup on the floor.)

One year ago: Hurricane Florence blew ashore with 90 mph winds, swamping entire communities along the Carolina coast. President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort agreed to cooperate with the special counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election; Manafort pleaded guilty to two federal crimes and avoided a second trial. In a statement released by the White House, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh denied an allegation of sexual misconduct from when he was in high school, saying, “I did not do this back in high school or at any time.”

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up