Today in History: July 14

FILE - In this Sunday, July 17, 2016 file photo, a French flag stands stall amongst a floral tribute for the victims killed during a deadly attack, on the famed Boulevard des Anglais in Nice, southern France. The relentless series of mass killings across the globe poses a challenge for experts trying to analyze them without lapsing into faulty generalizations. Terms like contagion and copycat killing apply in some cases, not in others, they say, and in certain instances perpetrators' terrorist ideology intersects with psychological instability. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani, File)
In 2016, terror struck Bastille Day celebrations in the French Riviera city of Nice (nees) as a large truck plowed into a festive crowd, killing 86 people in an attack claimed by Islamic State extremists; the driver was shot dead by police. FILE – In this Sunday, July 17, 2016 file photo, a French flag stands stall amongst a floral tribute for the victims killed during a deadly attack, on the famed Boulevard des Anglais in Nice, southern France. The relentless series of mass killings across the globe poses a challenge for experts trying to analyze them without lapsing into faulty generalizations. Terms like contagion and copycat killing apply in some cases, not in others, they say, and in certain instances perpetrators’ terrorist ideology intersects with psychological instability. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani, File) (AP)
FILE-- Italian immigrants Nicola Sacco, second from right foreground, and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, second from left foreground, stand in handcuffs with unidentified escorts in Massachusetts around 1927. Sacco and Vanzetti, arrested in 1920, were accused of killing a  paymaster and guard in Braintree, and stealing about $16,000.  Many believed they were convicted because of their anarchistic beliefs. Their scheduled execution was protested by ordinary and prominent men and women. The city of Boston will usea bronze sculpture of Sacco and Vanzetti to say the two men, executed 70 years ago, did not get a fair trial, said Mayor Thomas M. Menino, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 1997. On the anniversary of the executions, Saturday, Aug. 23, 1997, Menino will commission the sculpture which is to be in place by the year 2000, but it has not been  decided where. (AP Photo/File)

In 1921, Italian-born anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were convicted in Dedham, Massachusetts, of murdering a shoe company paymaster and his guard. (Sacco and Vanzetti were executed six years later.) Sacco, second from right foreground, and Vanzetti, second from left foreground, stand in handcuffs with unidentified escorts in Massachusetts around 1927. (AP Photo/File) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Young Nazis crowd on the back of a truck used for propoganda purposes advising people to vote 'Yes' in the great plebiscite as to whether Adolf Hitler should be elected President, in Berlin, Germany, Aug. 19, 1934. (AP Photo)
In 1933, all German political parties, except the Nazi Party, were outlawed. In this 1934 photo, young Nazis crowd on the back of a truck used for propoganda purposes advising people to vote “Yes” in the great plebiscite as to whether Adolf Hitler should be elected President, in Berlin, Germany. (AP Photo) (AP)
Scene outside the town house dormitory on Chicago's South Side, July 14, 1966 where eight student nurses were found slain. (AP Photo)
In 1966, the city of Chicago awoke to the shocking news that eight student nurses had been brutally slain during the night in a South Side dormitory. The victims, ranging in age from 20 to 24, were Pamela Wilkening; Suzanne Farris; Mary Ann Jordan; Nina Jo Schmale; Valentina Pasion; Merlita Gargullo; Patricia Matusek; and Gloria Jean Davy. (One woman, Corazon Amurao, survived by hiding under a bed.) Drifter Richard Speck was convicted of the mass killing and condemned to death, but had his sentence reduced to life in prison, where he died in 1991. This photo shows the scene outside the town house dormitory. (AP Photo) (AP)
FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 23, 1976 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Jimmy Carter gives an informal press conference in Los Angeles during a campaign tour through the West and Midwest. On Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015, Carter announced he has cancer and will undergo treatment at an Atlanta hospital. (AP Photo)

In 1976, Jimmy Carter won the Democratic presidential nomination at the party’s convention in New York. In this 1976 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Jimmy Carter gives an informal press conference in Los Angeles. (AP Photo) (AP)

"Patrouille de France" jet fighters fly blue white and red smoke past a giant French flag over the Champs Elysees in Paris Tuesday July 14 1998 on the occasion of the traditional Bastille day military parade. (AP PHOTO/JeromeDelay)
In 1789, in an event symbolizing the start of the French Revolution, citizens of Paris stormed the Bastille prison and released the seven prisoners inside. In this photo, “Patrouille de France” jet fighters fly blue, white and red smoke past a giant French flag over the Champs Elysees in Paris Tuesday, July 14, 1998 on the occasion of the traditional Bastille day military parade. (AP PHOTO/JeromeDelay) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/JEROME DELAY)
FILE - In this July 17, 1980, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan stands before a cheering Republican National Convention in Detroit's Joe Louis Arena. Republicans heading to their 2012 party convention in Tampa are eager to hear an earful about the shortcomings of President Barack Obama's record, the woeful U.S. economy and the competing visions of the two presidential candidates. They aren't looking for compromise, which most Americans say is necessary to get the nation on track. The delegates hear rhetoric that is brutal, vitriolic and far from conciliatory. The Republicans want a party like in 1980 when the GOP ousted a Democratic president after one term. (AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy, File)

In 1980, the Republican national convention opened in Detroit, where nominee-apparent Ronald Reagan told a welcoming rally he and his supporters were determined to “make America great again.” (AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy, File) (AP/Rusty Kennedy)

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FILE - In this Sunday, July 17, 2016 file photo, a French flag stands stall amongst a floral tribute for the victims killed during a deadly attack, on the famed Boulevard des Anglais in Nice, southern France. The relentless series of mass killings across the globe poses a challenge for experts trying to analyze them without lapsing into faulty generalizations. Terms like contagion and copycat killing apply in some cases, not in others, they say, and in certain instances perpetrators' terrorist ideology intersects with psychological instability. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani, File)
FILE-- Italian immigrants Nicola Sacco, second from right foreground, and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, second from left foreground, stand in handcuffs with unidentified escorts in Massachusetts around 1927. Sacco and Vanzetti, arrested in 1920, were accused of killing a  paymaster and guard in Braintree, and stealing about $16,000.  Many believed they were convicted because of their anarchistic beliefs. Their scheduled execution was protested by ordinary and prominent men and women. The city of Boston will usea bronze sculpture of Sacco and Vanzetti to say the two men, executed 70 years ago, did not get a fair trial, said Mayor Thomas M. Menino, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 1997. On the anniversary of the executions, Saturday, Aug. 23, 1997, Menino will commission the sculpture which is to be in place by the year 2000, but it has not been  decided where. (AP Photo/File)
Young Nazis crowd on the back of a truck used for propoganda purposes advising people to vote 'Yes' in the great plebiscite as to whether Adolf Hitler should be elected President, in Berlin, Germany, Aug. 19, 1934. (AP Photo)
Scene outside the town house dormitory on Chicago's South Side, July 14, 1966 where eight student nurses were found slain. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 23, 1976 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Jimmy Carter gives an informal press conference in Los Angeles during a campaign tour through the West and Midwest. On Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015, Carter announced he has cancer and will undergo treatment at an Atlanta hospital. (AP Photo)
"Patrouille de France" jet fighters fly blue white and red smoke past a giant French flag over the Champs Elysees in Paris Tuesday July 14 1998 on the occasion of the traditional Bastille day military parade. (AP PHOTO/JeromeDelay)
FILE - In this July 17, 1980, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan stands before a cheering Republican National Convention in Detroit's Joe Louis Arena. Republicans heading to their 2012 party convention in Tampa are eager to hear an earful about the shortcomings of President Barack Obama's record, the woeful U.S. economy and the competing visions of the two presidential candidates. They aren't looking for compromise, which most Americans say is necessary to get the nation on track. The delegates hear rhetoric that is brutal, vitriolic and far from conciliatory. The Republicans want a party like in 1980 when the GOP ousted a Democratic president after one term. (AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy, File)

Today is Sunday, July 14, the 195th day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On July 14, 1980, the Republican national convention opened in Detroit, where nominee-apparent Ronald Reagan told a welcoming rally he and his supporters were determined to “make America great again.”

On this date:

In 1789, in an event symbolizing the start of the French Revolution, citizens of Paris stormed the Bastille prison and released the seven prisoners inside.

In 1798, Congress passed the Sedition Act, making it a federal crime to publish false, scandalous or malicious writing about the United States government.

In 1912, American folk singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie (”This Land Is Your Land”) was born in Okemah, Okla.

In 1921, Italian-born anarchists Nicola Sacco (SAK’-oh) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were convicted in Dedham, Massachusetts, of murdering a shoe company paymaster and his guard. (Sacco and Vanzetti were executed six years later.)

In 1933, all German political parties, except the Nazi Party, were outlawed.

In 1966, the city of Chicago awoke to the shocking news that eight student nurses had been brutally slain during the night in a South Side dormitory. Drifter Richard Speck was convicted of the mass killing and condemned to death, but had his sentence reduced to life in prison, where he died in 1991.

In 1976, Jimmy Carter won the Democratic presidential nomination at the party’s convention in New York.

In 2003, newspaper columnist Robert Novak publicly revealed the CIA employment of Valerie Plame, wife of Joseph Wilson, a former U.S. ambassador in Africa who said the administration had twisted prewar intelligence on Iraq.

In 2004, the Senate scuttled a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage. (Forty-eight senators voted to advance the measure _ 12 short of the 60 needed _ and 50 voted to block it).

In 2013, thousands of demonstrators across the country protested a Florida jury’s decision the day before to clear George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

In 2016, terror struck Bastille Day celebrations in the French Riviera city of Nice (nees) as a large truck plowed into a festive crowd, killing 86 people in an attack claimed by Islamic State extremists; the driver was shot dead by police.

In 2017, a Russian-American lobbyist said he attended a June 2016 meeting with President Donald Trump’s son that was billed as part of a Russian government effort to help the Republican campaign.

Ten years ago: At her Senate confirmation hearing, Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor (SOHN’-ya soh-toh-my-YOR’) pushed back vigorously against Republican charges that she would bring bias and a liberal agenda to the nation’s highest bench. Disgraced financier Bernard Madoff arrived at the Butner Federal Correctional Complex in North Carolina to begin serving a 150-year sentence for his massive Ponzi scheme. The American League continued its dominance over the National League with a 4-3 win in the All-Star game at new Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

Five years ago: Citigroup agreed to pay $7 billion to settle a federal investigation into its handling of risky subprime mortgages. The Church of England voted overwhelmingly in favor of allowing women to become bishops.

One year ago: Angelique Kerber beat Serena Williams in the women’s final, 6-3, 6-3 for her first Wimbledon title. A firefighter, Braden Varney, was killed while trying to prevent a wildfire near California’s Yosemite National Park from spreading. Thousands of people in Scotland staged colorful, peaceful protests against Donald Trump as the U.S. president played golf at his Scottish golf resort at Turnberry ahead of his summit in Finland with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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