Today in History: July 25

On this date in 1885, Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died in Mount McGregor, New York, at age 63. (AP Photo)
In 1866, Ulysses S. Grant was named General of the Army of the United States, the first officer to hold the rank.

On this date in 1885, Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died in Mount McGregor, New York, at age 63. (AP Photo)

FOR USE WITH FEATURE PACKAGE FOR MONDAY, JULY 15--FILE--A huge mushroom cloud rises above Bikini atoll in the Marshall Islands July 25, 1946 following an atomic test blast, part of the U.S. military's "Operation Crossroads." The dark spots in foreground are ships that were placed near the blast site to test what an atom bomb would do to a fleet of warships. (AP Photo/file)
In 1946, the United States detonated an atomic bomb near Bikini Atoll in the Pacific in the first underwater test of the device.

Here, a huge mushroom cloud rises above Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands July 25, 1946 following an atomic test blast, part of the U.S. military’s “Operation Crossroads.” The dark spots in foreground are ships that were placed near the blast site to test what an atom bomb would do to a fleet of warships. (AP Photo/file)

People walk through a shopping area in Rio Piedras where many businesses have closed in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, July 1, 2015, the day a 11.5% sales tax went into effect, the highest of any U.S. state. The island's administration has been pushing for Congress to let the government and public agencies seek bankruptcy protection, while the White House has said no one is contemplating a federal bailout of Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
In 1952, Puerto Rico became a self-governing commonwealth of the United States.

In this photo, people walk through a shopping area in Rio Piedras where many businesses have closed in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, July 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

Joan Trumpauer, John Salter, Anne Moody
In 1960, a Woolworth’s store in Greensboro, North Carolina, that had been the scene of a sit-in protest against its whites-only lunch counter dropped its segregation policy.

This is a May 28, 1963, file photograph of a sit-in demonstration at a Woolworth’s lunch counter in Jackson, Miss., where whites poured sugar, ketchup and mustard over heads of the demonstrators. Seated at the counter, from left, are John Salter, Joan Trumpauer and Anne Moody. Moody, whose memoir “Coming of Age in Mississippi” gave a wrenching account of growing up poor in the segregated South and facing violence as a civil rights activist, died Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015, at her home in the small town Gloster, Mississippi. She was 74. (AP Photo/Jackson Daily News, Fred Blackwell, File)

In this 1950's photo released by the National Archives, a man included in a syphilis study sits on steps in front of of a house in Tuskegee, Ala. For 40 years starting in 1932, medical workers in the segregated South withheld treatment for unsuspecting men infected with a sexually transmitted disease simply so doctors could track the ravages of the horrid illness and dissect their bodies afterward. Finally exposed in 1972, the study ended and the men sued, resulting in a $9 million settlement. (National Archive via AP)
In 1972, the notorious Tuskegee syphilis experiment came to light as The Associated Press reported that for the previous four decades, the U.S. Public Health Service, in conjunction with the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, had been allowing poor, rural black male patients with syphilis to go without treatment, even allowing them to die, as a way of studying the disease.

In this 1950’s photo released by the National Archives, a man included in a syphilis study sits on steps in front of of a house in Tuskegee, Ala. For 40 years starting in 1932, medical workers in the segregated South withheld treatment for unsuspecting men infected with a sexually transmitted disease simply so doctors could track the ravages of the horrid illness and dissect their bodies afterward. Finally exposed in 1972, the study ended and the men sued, resulting in a $9 million settlement. (National Archive via AP)

FILE- in this Monday, July 25, 1995 file photo U.S. President Bill Clinton applauds as King Hussein of Jordan, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, right, shake hands after signing a declaration in Washington, D.C., ending 46-years of hostilities between the two countries. A diplomatic standoff between Israel and Jordan over a deadly shooting at Israel's embassy in the kingdom once again tests the strategically critical yet turbulent ties forged in a 1994 peace treaty.(AP Photo/Greg Gibson, File)
On July 25, 1994, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Jordan’s King Hussein signed a declaration at the White House ending their countries’ 46-year-old formal state of war.

In this Monday, July 25, 1995 file photo U.S. President Bill Clinton applauds as King Hussein of Jordan, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, right, shake hands after signing a declaration in Washington, D.C., ending 46-years of hostilities between the two countries. A diplomatic standoff between Israel and Jordan over a deadly shooting at Israel’s embassy in the kingdom once again tests the strategically critical yet turbulent ties forged in a 1994 peace treaty.(AP Photo/Greg Gibson, File)

FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Sherburne County Sheriff Office shows Zacarias Moussaoui. Moussaoui, the only person convicted in the United States in connection with the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, is suing President Donald Trump over conditions at a federal prison where he alleges he experiences "psychological torture" while kept in total isolation. (Sherburne County, Minn., Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
In 2002, Zacarias Moussaoui declared he was guilty of conspiracy in the September 11 attacks, then dramatically withdrew his plea at his arraignment in Alexandria, Va.

This undated file photo provided by the Sherburne County Sheriff Office shows Zacarias Moussaoui. Moussaoui, the only person convicted in the United States in connection with the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, is suing President Donald Trump over conditions at a federal prison where he alleges he experiences “psychological torture” while kept in total isolation. (Sherburne County, Minn., Sheriff’s Office via AP, File)

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On this date in 1885, Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died in Mount McGregor, New York, at age 63. (AP Photo)
FOR USE WITH FEATURE PACKAGE FOR MONDAY, JULY 15--FILE--A huge mushroom cloud rises above Bikini atoll in the Marshall Islands July 25, 1946 following an atomic test blast, part of the U.S. military's "Operation Crossroads." The dark spots in foreground are ships that were placed near the blast site to test what an atom bomb would do to a fleet of warships. (AP Photo/file)
People walk through a shopping area in Rio Piedras where many businesses have closed in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, July 1, 2015, the day a 11.5% sales tax went into effect, the highest of any U.S. state. The island's administration has been pushing for Congress to let the government and public agencies seek bankruptcy protection, while the White House has said no one is contemplating a federal bailout of Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
Joan Trumpauer, John Salter, Anne Moody
In this 1950's photo released by the National Archives, a man included in a syphilis study sits on steps in front of of a house in Tuskegee, Ala. For 40 years starting in 1932, medical workers in the segregated South withheld treatment for unsuspecting men infected with a sexually transmitted disease simply so doctors could track the ravages of the horrid illness and dissect their bodies afterward. Finally exposed in 1972, the study ended and the men sued, resulting in a $9 million settlement. (National Archive via AP)
FILE- in this Monday, July 25, 1995 file photo U.S. President Bill Clinton applauds as King Hussein of Jordan, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, right, shake hands after signing a declaration in Washington, D.C., ending 46-years of hostilities between the two countries. A diplomatic standoff between Israel and Jordan over a deadly shooting at Israel's embassy in the kingdom once again tests the strategically critical yet turbulent ties forged in a 1994 peace treaty.(AP Photo/Greg Gibson, File)
FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Sherburne County Sheriff Office shows Zacarias Moussaoui. Moussaoui, the only person convicted in the United States in connection with the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, is suing President Donald Trump over conditions at a federal prison where he alleges he experiences "psychological torture" while kept in total isolation. (Sherburne County, Minn., Sheriff's Office via AP, File)

Today is Thursday, July 25, the 206th day of 2019. There are 159 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On July 25, 1960, a Woolworth’s store in Greensboro, North Carolina, that had been the scene of a sit-in protest against its whites-only lunch counter dropped its segregation policy.

On this date:

In 1866, Ulysses S. Grant was named General of the Army of the United States, the first officer to hold the rank.

In 1946, the United States detonated an atomic bomb near Bikini Atoll in the Pacific in the first underwater test of the device.

In 1952, Puerto Rico became a self-governing commonwealth of the United States.

In 1956, the Italian liner SS Andrea Doria collided with the Swedish passenger ship Stockholm off the New England coast late at night and began sinking; 51 people — 46 from the Andrea Doria, five from the Stockholm — were killed. (The Andrea Doria capsized and sank the following morning.)

In 1972, the notorious Tuskegee syphilis experiment came to light as The Associated Press reported that for the previous four decades, the U.S. Public Health Service, in conjunction with the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, had been allowing poor, rural black male patients with syphilis to go without treatment, even allowing them to die, as a way of studying the disease.

In 1978, Louise Joy Brown, the first “test tube baby,” was born in Oldham, England; she’d been conceived through the technique of in-vitro fertilization.

In 1984, Soviet cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya (sah-VEETS’-kah-yah) became the first woman to walk in space as she carried out more than three hours of experiments outside the orbiting space station Salyut 7.

In 1985, a spokeswoman for Rock Hudson confirmed that the actor, hospitalized in Paris, was suffering from AIDS. (Hudson died in October 1985.)

In 1986, movie director Vincente Minnelli, known for such musicals as “Gigi,” ”An American in Paris” and “Meet Me in St. Louis,” died in Los Angeles at age 83.

In 1994, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (YIT’-sahk rah-BEEN’) and Jordan’s King Hussein (hoo-SAYN’) signed a declaration at the White House ending their countries’ 46-year-old formal state of war.

In 2000, a New York-bound Air France Concorde crashed outside Paris shortly after takeoff, killing all 109 people on board and four people on the ground; it was the first-ever crash of the supersonic jet.

In 2002, Zacarias Moussaoui (zak-uh-REE’-uhs moo-SOW’-ee) declared he was guilty of conspiracy in the September 11 attacks, then dramatically withdrew his plea at his arraignment in Alexandria, Va.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama continued his full-court press to pass health care reform legislation, citing a new White House study indicating that small businesses were paying far more per employee for health insurance than big companies, a disparity the president said was “unsustainable” as well as “unacceptable.” Protesters across the world called on Iran to end its clampdown on opposition activists.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama met at the White House with the presidents of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador; afterward, he urged the leaders and congressional Republicans to help ease the influx of minors and migrant families crossing the southwest border of the United States.

One year ago: After a White House meeting, President Donald Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (zhahn-KLOHD’ YUN’-kur) announced they had agreed to work toward “zero tariffs” and “zero subsidies” on non-automobile goods, dialing down tensions that had been rising. Sergio Marchionne (SEHR’-jee-oh mar-kee-OH’-nay), the founding CEO of Fiat Chrysler who saved two carmakers from near-certain failure, died at the age of 66 after complications from surgery in Switzerland. A study published in the journal Science revealed that a huge lake of salty water appears to be buried deep in Mars, raising the possibility of finding life on the planet. Undefeated Triple Crown winner Justify was retired to stud because of swelling in an ankle; the colt had won all six career starts.

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