Today in History: July 11

Aaron Burr, who served as Thomas Jefferson's vice president, is shown in an illustration on Oct. 4, 1956. Burr was indicted for murder in the duel slaying of Alexander Hamilton and later for treason in a plot to seize the new Louisiana Territory. (AP Photo)
On July 11, 1804, Vice President Aaron Burr mortally wounded former Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton during a pistol duel in Weehawken, New Jersey. (Hamilton died the next day.) Aaron Burr, who served as Thomas Jefferson’s vice president, is shown in an illustration on Oct. 4, 1956. Burr was indicted for murder in the duel slaying of Alexander Hamilton and later for treason in a plot to seize the new Louisiana Territory. (AP Photo) (AP)
FILE - This Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 file photo, shows a view of central London's skyline by the river Thames. Hungerford Bridge, foreground, Big Ben's clock tower and Houses of Parliament, left. The Metropolitan Police said Monday April 2, 2018, the homicide rate in London has increased each month so far this year as the British capital suffers from an increase in knife-related crime. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)
In 1859, Big Ben, the great bell inside the famous London clock tower, chimed for the first time. This Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 file photo, shows a view of central London’s skyline by the river Thames. Hungerford Bridge, foreground, Big Ben’s clock tower and Houses of Parliament, left. The Metropolitan Police said Monday April 2, 2018, the homicide rate in London has increased each month so far this year as the British capital suffers from an increase in knife-related crime. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File) (AP/Lefteris Pitarakis)
FILE - This 1919 file photo shows Boston Red Sox player Babe Ruth. Ruth played in the 1918 World Series against the Chicago Cubs that the Red Sox won 4-2.  In a 1920 court deposition on display at the Chicago History Museum by Chicago White Sox pitcher Eddie Cicotte,  one of the key members from the infamous 1919 Black Sox scandal, he hinted that the White Sox got the idea to throw the 1919 World Series after the Chicago Cubs threw the 1918 World Series. (AP Photo/File)
In 1914, Babe Ruth made his Major League baseball debut, pitching the Boston Red Sox to a 4-3 victory over Cleveland. This 1919 file photo shows Boston Red Sox player Babe Ruth. Ruth played in the 1918 World Series against the Chicago Cubs that the Red Sox won 4-2. (AP Photo/File) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
Republican presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower, beaming and happy, wears an "I Like Everybody," pin on his coat lapel before leaving his hotel for the convention hall in Chicago, July 11, 1952, where the Republican National Convention is being held.  Others are unidentified.  (AP Photo)
In 1952, the Republican National Convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Dwight D. Eisenhower for president and Richard M. Nixon for vice president. Here, Republican presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower, beaming and happy, wears an “I Like Everybody,” pin on his coat lapel before leaving his hotel for the convention hall in Chicago, July 11, 1952, where the Republican National Convention is being held. Others are unidentified. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
Sandra Lindley, right and Lydia Kuhn behind listens to a reader at the Krispy Kreme shop Monday, March 6, 2006, in Fresno, Calif. Kuhn and others like her spent the morning reading "To Kill a Mockingbird," as part of The National Endowment for the Arts effort to get American's to read more. The program helped kick off a month's worth of programs meant to take the classic novel where the readers are; doughnut shops, retirement homes, downtown bars, museums and yes, even libraries.(AP Photo/Gary Kazanjian)
In 1960, the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee was first published by J.B. Lippincott and Co. Here, Sandra Lindley, right and Lydia Kuhn behind listens to a reader at the Krispy Kreme shop Monday, March 6, 2006, in Fresno, Calif. Kuhn and others like her spent the morning reading “To Kill a Mockingbird,” as part of The National Endowment for the Arts effort to get American’s to read more. The program helped kick off a month’s worth of programs meant to take the classic novel where the readers are; doughnut shops, retirement homes, downtown bars, museums and yes, even libraries.(AP Photo/Gary Kazanjian) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/GARY KAZANJIAN)
U.S. Customs official Oliver Seymour inspects the largest piece of the downed Skylab at the San Francisco International Airport, Ca., Wedenesday night, July 25, 1979.  The one-ton piece wreckage was found in Australia two weeks ago.   (AP Photo)
In 1979, the abandoned U.S. space station Skylab made a spectacular return to Earth, burning up in the atmosphere and showering debris over the Indian Ocean and Australia. U.S. Customs official Oliver Seymour inspects the largest piece of the downed Skylab at the San Francisco International Airport, Ca., Wedenesday night, July 25, 1979. The one-ton piece wreckage was found in Australia two weeks ago. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Muslim women trapped in the besieged town of Srebrenica vent out their fears during a gathering in Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina on March 11, 1993. Unidentified woman at center is a refugee from Vlasenica, Eastern Bosnia, trapped in Srebenica since early on March. (AP Photo/Haris Nezirovic)
In 1995, the U.N.-designated “safe haven” of Srebrenica in Bosnia-Herzegovina fell to Bosnian Serb forces, who then carried out the killings of more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys. Here, Muslim women trapped in the besieged town of Srebrenica vent out their fears during a gathering in Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina on March 11, 1993. Unidentified woman at center is a refugee from Vlasenica, Eastern Bosnia, trapped in Srebenica since early on March. (AP Photo/Haris Nezirovic) (AP/Haris Nezirovic)
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Aaron Burr, who served as Thomas Jefferson's vice president, is shown in an illustration on Oct. 4, 1956. Burr was indicted for murder in the duel slaying of Alexander Hamilton and later for treason in a plot to seize the new Louisiana Territory. (AP Photo)
FILE - This Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 file photo, shows a view of central London's skyline by the river Thames. Hungerford Bridge, foreground, Big Ben's clock tower and Houses of Parliament, left. The Metropolitan Police said Monday April 2, 2018, the homicide rate in London has increased each month so far this year as the British capital suffers from an increase in knife-related crime. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)
FILE - This 1919 file photo shows Boston Red Sox player Babe Ruth. Ruth played in the 1918 World Series against the Chicago Cubs that the Red Sox won 4-2.  In a 1920 court deposition on display at the Chicago History Museum by Chicago White Sox pitcher Eddie Cicotte,  one of the key members from the infamous 1919 Black Sox scandal, he hinted that the White Sox got the idea to throw the 1919 World Series after the Chicago Cubs threw the 1918 World Series. (AP Photo/File)
Republican presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower, beaming and happy, wears an "I Like Everybody," pin on his coat lapel before leaving his hotel for the convention hall in Chicago, July 11, 1952, where the Republican National Convention is being held.  Others are unidentified.  (AP Photo)
Sandra Lindley, right and Lydia Kuhn behind listens to a reader at the Krispy Kreme shop Monday, March 6, 2006, in Fresno, Calif. Kuhn and others like her spent the morning reading "To Kill a Mockingbird," as part of The National Endowment for the Arts effort to get American's to read more. The program helped kick off a month's worth of programs meant to take the classic novel where the readers are; doughnut shops, retirement homes, downtown bars, museums and yes, even libraries.(AP Photo/Gary Kazanjian)
U.S. Customs official Oliver Seymour inspects the largest piece of the downed Skylab at the San Francisco International Airport, Ca., Wedenesday night, July 25, 1979.  The one-ton piece wreckage was found in Australia two weeks ago.   (AP Photo)
Muslim women trapped in the besieged town of Srebrenica vent out their fears during a gathering in Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina on March 11, 1993. Unidentified woman at center is a refugee from Vlasenica, Eastern Bosnia, trapped in Srebenica since early on March. (AP Photo/Haris Nezirovic)

Today is Thursday, July 11, the 192nd day of 2019. There are 173 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On July 11, 1972, the World Chess Championship opened as grandmasters Bobby Fischer of the United States and defending champion Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union began play in Reykjavik, Iceland. (Fischer won after 21 games.)

On this date:

In 1798, the U.S. Marine Corps was formally re-established by a congressional act that also created the U.S. Marine Band.

In 1804, Vice President Aaron Burr mortally wounded former Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton during a pistol duel in Weehawken, New Jersey. (Hamilton died the next day.)

In 1859, Big Ben, the great bell inside the famous London clock tower, chimed for the first time.

In 1914, Babe Ruth made his Major League baseball debut, pitching the Boston Red Sox to a 4-3 victory over Cleveland.

In 1915, the Chicago Sunday Tribune ran an article titled, “Blues Is Jazz and Jazz Is Blues.” (It’s believed to be one of the earliest, if not the earliest, uses of the word “jazz” as a musical term by a newspaper.)

In 1937, American composer and pianist George Gershwin died at a Los Angeles hospital of a brain tumor; he was 38.

In 1952, the Republican National Convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Dwight D. Eisenhower for president and Richard M. Nixon for vice president.

In 1955, the U.S. Air Force Academy swore in its first class of cadets at its temporary quarters at Lowry Air Force Base in Colorado.

In 1960, the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee was first published by J.B. Lippincott and Co.

In 1979, the abandoned U.S. space station Skylab made a spectacular return to Earth, burning up in the atmosphere and showering debris over the Indian Ocean and Australia.

In 1995, the U.N.-designated “safe haven” of Srebrenica (sreh-breh-NEET’-sah) in Bosnia-Herzegovina fell to Bosnian Serb forces, who then carried out the killings of more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys. The United States normalized relations with Vietnam.

In 2017, emails released by Donald Trump Jr. revealed that he’d been told before meeting with a Russian attorney during the presidential campaign that the Russian government had information that could “incriminate” Hillary Clinton. MSNBC “Morning Joe” host and former Republican congressman Joe Scarborough announced that he was leaving the Republican party, partly because of its loyalty to President Donald Trump.

Ten years ago: During a visit to sub-Saharan Africa, President Barack Obama addressed Ghana’s Parliament, where he challenged the continent of his ancestors to shed corruption and conflict in favor of peace. Funeral services were held in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, for former NFL star Steve McNair, who had been shot to death in Nashville a week earlier by Sahel Kazemi (sah-HEHL’ kah-ZEE’-mee), who then took her own life.

Five years ago: House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers, R-Ky., said that President Barack Obama’s $3.7 billion emergency request to deal with tens of thousands of unaccompanied children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border was too big to get through the House, as a growing number of Democrats rejected policy changes Republicans were demanding as their price for approving any money. Tommy Ramone, 65, a co-founder of the seminal punk band the Ramones and the last surviving member of the original group, died in New York.

One year ago: At a NATO summit in Brussels, President Donald Trump declared that a gas pipeline venture had left Germany’s government “captive to Russia,” and questioned the necessity of the NATO alliance. John Schnatter, the founder of Papa John’s, resigned as chairman of the board of the pizza chain, and apologized for using a racial slur during a conference call in May. Porn star Stormy Daniels was arrested at an Ohio strip club, accused of touching and being touched by patrons in violation of state law; prosecutors dropped the charges hours later, saying the law had been improperly applied.

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© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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