Today in History: June 13

In 1842, Queen Victoria became the first British monarch to ride on a train, traveling from Slough Railway Station to Paddington in 25 minutes. QUEEN VICTORIA IN 1887: This portrait of queen Victoria was made for the occasion of her 1887 jubilee. (AP-Photo/hdw/- 1887 -) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/HO)
Flying ace Charles A. Lindbergh rides an open car hatless, during a ticker tape parade for him, June 13, 1927 in New York City.  Riding with him are Mayor Jimmy Walker, right, and Grover Whalen, seated in front of Lindbergh.  (AP Photo)
In 1927, aviation hero Charles Lindbergh was honored with a ticker-tape parade in New York City. Here, flying ace Lindbergh rides an open car hatless, during the ticker tape parade. Riding with him are Mayor Jimmy Walker, right, and Grover Whalen, seated in front of Lindbergh. (AP Photo) (AP)
James J. Braddock, heavyweight champion, is working out at Stillmans Gym and was helped  by his two sons Jay, left, and Howard, Jan. 27, 1937 in New York. (AP Photo)
In 1935, James Braddock claimed the title of world heavyweight boxing champion from Max Baer in a 15-round fight in Queens, New York. Here, Braddock is working out at Stillmans Gym and was helped by his two sons Jay, left, and Howard, Jan. 27, 1937 in New York. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
In 1966, the Supreme Court ruled in Miranda v. Arizona that criminal suspects had to be informed of their constitutional right to consult with an attorney and to remain silent. Ernesto Miranda, looking at the view on the roof of a Phoenix office building, March 30, 1973. In the 1960s, his case was one of three brought to the Supreme Court which forced a dramatic reversal in the methods of American police. (AP Photo) (AP)
Thurgood Marshall, solicitor general of the U.S., is seen at a Senate hearing on his fitness to be appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court, July 19, 1967, in Washington.  (AP Photo/John Rous)
In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson nominated Solicitor-General Thurgood Marshall to become the first black justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Thurgood Marshall, solicitor general of the U.S., is seen at a Senate hearing on his fitness to be appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court, July 19, 1967, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Rous) (AP/John Rous)
Actresses and co-stars Stockard Channing, left, and Olivia Newton-John ready themselves for their roles in the movie version of "Grease," in Los Angeles, Aug. 30, 1977.  Ms. Channing  and Ms. Newton-John star with John Travolta in the film.  (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
On June 13, 1978, the movie musical “Grease,” starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, had its world premiere in New York. Actresses and co-stars Stockard Channing, left, and Olivia Newton-John ready themselves for their roles in the movie version of “Grease,” in Los Angeles, Aug. 30, 1977. Ms. Channing and Ms. Newton-John star with John Travolta in the film. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Nick Ut)
The space probe "Pioneer 10" moves through the vastness of space, here in an artistic impression in front of the planet Pluto. (AP File Photo/NASA)
In 1983, the U.S. space probe Pioneer 10, launched in 1972, became the first spacecraft to leave the solar system as it crossed the orbit of Neptune. The space probe “Pioneer 10” moves through the vastness of space, here in an artistic impression in front of the planet Pluto. (AP File Photo/NASA) (AP File Photo/NASA)
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Flying ace Charles A. Lindbergh rides an open car hatless, during a ticker tape parade for him, June 13, 1927 in New York City.  Riding with him are Mayor Jimmy Walker, right, and Grover Whalen, seated in front of Lindbergh.  (AP Photo)
James J. Braddock, heavyweight champion, is working out at Stillmans Gym and was helped  by his two sons Jay, left, and Howard, Jan. 27, 1937 in New York. (AP Photo)
Thurgood Marshall, solicitor general of the U.S., is seen at a Senate hearing on his fitness to be appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court, July 19, 1967, in Washington.  (AP Photo/John Rous)
Actresses and co-stars Stockard Channing, left, and Olivia Newton-John ready themselves for their roles in the movie version of "Grease," in Los Angeles, Aug. 30, 1977.  Ms. Channing  and Ms. Newton-John star with John Travolta in the film.  (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
The space probe "Pioneer 10" moves through the vastness of space, here in an artistic impression in front of the planet Pluto. (AP File Photo/NASA)

Today is Thursday, June 13, the 164th day of 2019. There are 201 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 13, 1966, the Supreme Court ruled in Miranda v. Arizona that criminal suspects had to be informed of their constitutional right to consult with an attorney and to remain silent.

On this date:

In 1842, Queen Victoria became the first British monarch to ride on a train, traveling from Slough Railway Station to Paddington in 25 minutes.

In 1927, aviation hero Charles Lindbergh was honored with a ticker-tape parade in New York City.

In 1935, James Braddock claimed the title of world heavyweight boxing champion from Max Baer in a 15-round fight in Queens, New York. “Becky Sharp,” the first movie photographed in “three-strip” Technicolor, opened in New York.

In 1942, a four-man Nazi sabotage team arrived on Long Island, New York, three days before a second four-man team landed in Florida. (All eight men were arrested after two members of the first group defected.) President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Office of Strategic Services and the Office of War Information.

In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson nominated Solicitor-General Thurgood Marshall to become the first black justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 1977, James Earl Ray, the convicted assassin of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., was recaptured following his escape three days earlier from a Tennessee prison.

In 1978, the movie musical “Grease,” starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, had its world premiere in New York.

In 1983, the U.S. space probe Pioneer 10, launched in 1972, became the first spacecraft to leave the solar system as it crossed the orbit of Neptune.

In 1993, Canada’s Progressive Conservative Party chose Defense Minister Kim Campbell to succeed Brian Mulroney (muhl-ROO’-nee) as prime minister; she was the first woman to hold the post. Astronaut Donald K. “Deke” Slayton died in League City, Texas, at age 69.

In 1997, a jury voted unanimously to give Timothy McVeigh the death penalty for his role in the Oklahoma City bombing. The Chicago Bulls captured their fifth professional basketball championship in seven years with a 90-to-86 victory over the Utah Jazz in game six.

In 2005, A jury in Santa Maria, California, acquitted Michael Jackson of molesting a 13-year-old cancer survivor at his Neverland ranch. The Supreme Court warned prosecutors to use care in striking minorities from juries, siding with black murder defendants in Texas and California who contended their juries had been unfairly stacked with whites.

In 2008, Tim Russert, moderator of NBC’s “Meet the Press,” died suddenly while preparing for his weekly broadcast; he was 58. R. Kelly was acquitted of all charges in his child pornography trial in Chicago, ending a six-year ordeal for the R&B superstar.

Ten years ago: Opponents of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (ah-muh-DEE’-neh-zhahd) clashed with police in the heart of Tehran after the Iranian president claimed a re-election victory. Hundreds gathered at a sprawling hillside cemetery in Los Angeles to attend a funeral for David Carradine, more than a week after the 72-year-old actor was found hanging in a Bangkok hotel room.

Five years ago: The Internal Revenue Service told Congress it had lost a trove of emails to and from Lois Lerner, a central figure in the agency’s tea party controversy, sparking outrage from congressional investigators. The Los Angeles Kings won the Stanley Cup for the second time in three years with a 3-2 victory over the New York Rangers in Game 5. Hall of Fame football coach Chuck Noll, 82, died in Sewickley, Pennsylvania.

One year ago: President Donald Trump declared that his summit with Kim Jong Un had ended any nuclear threat from North Korea, though the meeting had produced no details on how or when weapons might be eliminated or reduced. On the eve of the start of the World Cup in Russia, FIFA voters chose to award the 2026 World Cup to North America.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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