Preview the Smithsonian’s reopened dinosaur and fossil hall (photos)

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History is set to reopen its dinosaur and fossil hall on Saturday. See a preview of the new “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils – Deep Time” in the gallery below.

The 31,000-square-foot exhibition will feature more than 700 fossil specimens, including mammals, reptiles and insects — and even an authentic Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
The 31,000-square-foot exhibition will feature more than 700 fossil specimens, including mammals, reptiles and insects — and even an authentic Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Known as “The King of the Carnivores,” the Tyrannosaurus was the largest meat eater in western North America. Visitors to the "Deep Time" exhibition will learn about large and small fossils throughout, including the evolution of plant and animal life. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Known as “The King of the Carnivores,” the Tyrannosaurus was the largest meat eater in western North America. Visitors to the “Deep Time” exhibition will learn about large and small fossils throughout, including the evolution of plant and animal life. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
The American Mastodon is one of nearly 700 specimen featured at the new “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils - Deep Time.” The hall explores Earth’s 3.7 billion year history. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
The American mastodon is also one of the over 700 specimens featured at the new “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils – Deep Time” exhibition. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
The American Mastodon is one of nearly 700 specimen featured at the new “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils - Deep Time.” The hall explores Earth’s 3.7 billion year history. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
“Deep Time” explores the connections among ecosystems, the climate, geological forces and evolution. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors can explore a rendering of a forest from 300 million years ago. The working Fossil Lab will also give visitors a chance to watch scientists continue their work. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors can explore a rendering of a forest from 300 million years ago. The working Fossil Lab will also give visitors a chance to watch scientists continue their work. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors can explore a rendering of a forest from 300 million years ago. The working Fossil Lab will also give visitors a chance to watch scientists continue their work. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History reopens the renovated dinosaur and fossil hall to the public on Saturday. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
In the Fossil Basecamp, visitors can explore connections between life and Earth. They can also learn how fossils form and how to date them. On Saturday, paleontologists will be on site to work with visitors in this interactive area. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
In the Fossil Basecamp, visitors can explore connections between life and Earth. They can also learn how fossils form and how to date them. On Saturday, paleontologists will be on site to work with visitors in this interactive area. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors will learn about these plants and animals that walked the Earth before an asteroid struck, leading to mass extinction. Volunteers will be available throughout the exhibition's opening weekend to help visitors learn from and engage with the exhibition. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors can also learn about the plants and animals that lived before an asteroid struck, leading to mass extinction. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors will learn about these plants and animals that walked the Earth before an asteroid struck, leading to mass extinction. Volunteers will be available throughout the exhibition's opening weekend to help visitors learn from and engage with the exhibition. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Volunteers will be available throughout the exhibition’s opening weekend to help visitors learn from and engage with the exhibition. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors will learn about these plants and animals that walked the Earth before an asteroid struck, leading to mass extinction. Volunteers will be available throughout the exhibition's opening weekend to help visitors learn from and engage with the exhibition. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
“The David H. Koch Hall of Fossils – Deep Time” is named in recognition of a $35 million gift from David H. Koch. (WTOP/Melissa Howell) (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
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The 31,000-square-foot exhibition will feature more than 700 fossil specimens, including mammals, reptiles and insects — and even an authentic Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Known as “The King of the Carnivores,” the Tyrannosaurus was the largest meat eater in western North America. Visitors to the "Deep Time" exhibition will learn about large and small fossils throughout, including the evolution of plant and animal life. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
The American Mastodon is one of nearly 700 specimen featured at the new “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils - Deep Time.” The hall explores Earth’s 3.7 billion year history. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
The American Mastodon is one of nearly 700 specimen featured at the new “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils - Deep Time.” The hall explores Earth’s 3.7 billion year history. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors can explore a rendering of a forest from 300 million years ago. The working Fossil Lab will also give visitors a chance to watch scientists continue their work. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors can explore a rendering of a forest from 300 million years ago. The working Fossil Lab will also give visitors a chance to watch scientists continue their work. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
In the Fossil Basecamp, visitors can explore connections between life and Earth. They can also learn how fossils form and how to date them. On Saturday, paleontologists will be on site to work with visitors in this interactive area. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors will learn about these plants and animals that walked the Earth before an asteroid struck, leading to mass extinction. Volunteers will be available throughout the exhibition's opening weekend to help visitors learn from and engage with the exhibition. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors will learn about these plants and animals that walked the Earth before an asteroid struck, leading to mass extinction. Volunteers will be available throughout the exhibition's opening weekend to help visitors learn from and engage with the exhibition. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)
Visitors will learn about these plants and animals that walked the Earth before an asteroid struck, leading to mass extinction. Volunteers will be available throughout the exhibition's opening weekend to help visitors learn from and engage with the exhibition. (WTOP/Melissa Howell)

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