D-Day: AP photos from 75 years ago

Photos of the D-Day invasion as it happened, from the Associated Press.

Men struggle through beach obstacles in the water during the first assault on the beaches in Normandy, France, on June 6, 1945. (AP Photo)
Special service troops (commandos) fight way inland from French beaches under enemy shell, mortar and sniper fire. The British troops pushed inland on one of the Normandy beaches in France on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Following the first Allied landings on the French coast, June 6, 1944, troops at once began to move inland. Passing through French villages, they were given a warm welcome by the inhabitants. An armoured Bren gun carrier marked with the allied “invasion star” carries Tommies thru a captured Normandy village as a British “Don R” (motorcycle dispatch rider) pulls off the road in the foreground. (AP Photo)
Scenes on a Normandy beachhead as crack British troops made their first landing, on June 6, 1944 in France. Picture from British Army Film Unit. (AP Photo)
Some of the first assault troops to hit the beachhead hide behind enemy beach obstacles to fire on the Germans, on a Normandy beach, on June 6, 1944. Landing craft in background, trying to unload more troops. (AP Photo)
American Soldiers equiped with full pack and extra allotments of ammunition, march down ian english street to their invasion craft for embarkation on June 6, 1944.(AP Photo)
Following the initial landings on the French coast, Allied troops at once began to push inland. Passing through Normandy villages they were given warm welcome by the inhabitants. British Commandos passing through the streets of a town near Caen on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
On board the Captain Class Frigate H.M.S. Holmes when she formed part of the escort to the Navy’s big ships off Le Havre during their bombardment of enemy positions on the Normandy Coast on June 6, 1944. The 15-inch guns of the war ship shelling German invasion coast positions is shown. (AP Photo)
U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt wears an expression of confidence and determination as he receives visitors in his White House office on this long-awaited D-Day of the start of the western European invasion in Washington on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Canadian invasion troops stand guard over the first German prisoners captured during the assault on France by Allied forces on June 6, 1944 along a 100 mile front on the Normandy coast between LeHavre and Cherbourg. Wounded soldiers are being treated, in the background. At extreme bear are German coastal fortifications of masonry, silenced by the invaders. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this June 6, 1944 file picture, some of the first assault troops to hit the Normandy, France beachhead take cover behind enemy obstacles to fire on German forces as others follow the first tanks plunging through the water towards the German-held shore during World War II. (AP Photo)
The 15-inch guns of warspite shelling German invasion coast positions on the Normandy coast on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Destroyers and small naval craft patrol the Channel and protect ships carrying reinforcements in men and materials against the enemy in Normandy in June 1944. (AP Photo)
Ducks (amphibious trucks) and a half-track follow foot troops ashore during opening of invasion of France on a 100-mile front along the Normandy coast by Allied force on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
A puff of black smoke blows away from the guns of the USS Arkansas in June 1944 as the might battleship lays down a tremendous barrage against German installations on the beach area of France, in support to the Allied ground forces who stormed the Normandy beaches. (AP Photo)
The Hulks of wrecked landing craft lie on the beach (foreground) and sunken vessels which formed breakwater for ships in the D-Day landing at Omaha Beach, Normandy, France on June 6, 1944, lie offshore in quiet which contrasts with the fierce fighting when the allies first invaded the Fortress Europe from across the Channel. Many of the scars of battle have been erased, but these Hulks remain as beachhead a year after D-Day. (AP Photo/Peter J. Carroll)
American troops on the quayside of a British port ready to embark in landing craft which took them out to larger craft lying off the coast, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/Peter J. Carroll)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a U.S. Coast Guard landing barge, tightly packed with helmeted soldiers, approaches the shore at Normandy, France, during initial Allied landing operations, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. Coast Guard)
New York stock exchange stops trading between eleven and 11:02 a.m. as John A. Colman, chairman of the board of the New York Stock Exchange, on balcony with other officials, reads General Dwight Eisenhower's invasion message, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/ Kradin)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, smoking, chatting, smiling or just sitting with their own thoughts, American paratroopers, heavily armed, soar over the English Channel en route to play a key role in the invasion of France, June 6, 1944. They are landing inland of the 100-mile coast along the Normandy area. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, a big U.S. Army field kitchen is rolled up the open bow of a landing ship tank during loading operations at an undisclosed English invasion port, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)
FILE - In this June 6, 1944, file photo, provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, General Dwight Eisenhower gives the order of the day, "Full Victory - Nothing Else" to paratroopers in England just before they board their planes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe. June 6, 2019, marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the assault that began the liberation of France and Europe from German occupation, leading to the end World War II. (U.S. Army Signal Corps Photo via AP)
Yanks Go Ashore In Invasion of France - On June 6. 1944, waves and waves of men swept Normandy shore. (AP-Photo)
Sitting in the cover of their foxholes, American soldiers of the Allied Expeditionary Force secure a beachhead during initial landing operations at Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. In the background amphibious tanks and other equipment crowd the beach, while landing craft bring more troops and material ashore. (AP Photo/Weston Haynes)
A U.S. Coast Guard LCI, heavily listing to port, moves alongside a transport ship to evacuate her troops, during the initial Normandy landing operations in France, on June 6, 1944. Moments later the craft will capsize and sink. Note that helmeted infantrymen, with full packs, are all standing to starboard side of the ship. (AP Photo)
Under the cover of naval shell fire, American infantrymen wade ashore from their landing craft during the initial Normandy landing operations in France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/Peter Carroll)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a U.S. Coast Guard landing barge, tightly packed with helmeted soldiers, approaches the shore at Normandy, France, during initial Allied landing operations, June 6, 1944. These barges ride back and forth across the English Channel, bringing wave after wave of reinforcement troops to the Allied beachheads. (AP Photo/U.S. Coast Guard)
Men and supplies are being ferried out to landing crafts enroute for the initial Allied invasion of the Normandy, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/Peter Carroll)
As the Allied invasion of the Normandy gets underway, American troops are shown as they embark in landing crafts at a British port, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/Peter Carroll)
After landing at the shore, these British troops wait for the signal to move forward, during the initial Allied landing operations in Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Members of a British special service commando are having their kits checked before leaving for the Allied landing operations of the Normandy coast in France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
In this image provided by the U.S. Signal Corps, Supreme Commander Dwight Eisenhower visits paratroopers of the 101st Airborne Division at the Royal Air Force base in Greenham Common, England, three hours before the men board their planes to participate in the first assault wave of the invasion of the continent of Europe, June 5, 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. Signal Corps)
Ducks (amphibious trucks) and a half-track follow foot troops ashore during the invasion of Normandy on a 100-mile front along the French coast by allied forces on June 6, 1944. This was a turning point for the Allies in World War II, known as D-Day. (AP Photo)
In this photo provided by the British Navy, wounded British troops from the South Lancashire and Middlesex regiments are being helped ashore at Sword Beach, June 6, 1944, during the D-Day invasion of German occupied France during World War II. (AP Photo/British Navy)
Ducks (amphibious trucks) and a half-track follow foot troops ashore during the World War II opening invasion of France on a 100-mile front along the Normandy coast by Allied forces on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. Coast Guard)
A first wave beach battalion Ducks lays low under the fire of Nazi guns on the beach of southern France on D-Day, June 6, 1944 during World War II. One invader operates a walkie talkie radio directing other landing craft to the safest spots for unloading their parties of fighting men. (AP Photo)
American soldiers and supplies arrive on the shore of the French coast of German-occupied Normandy during the Allied D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944 in World War II. (AP Photo)
American paratroopers, heavily armed, sit inside a military plane as they soar over the English Channel en route to the Normandy French coast for the Allied D-Day invasion of the German stronghold during World War II, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
British troops make their way through low water and up the beach after leaving landing craft which transported them across the Channel to the Normandy beachhead for D-Day invasion in France, June 6, 1944 in World War II. (AP Photo/Official British photo)
Carrying full equipment, American assault troops move onto a beachhead code-named Omaha Beach, on the northern coast of France on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy coast. (AP Photo)
German prisoners of war are led away by Allied forces from Utah Beach, on June 6, 1944, during landing operations at the Normandy coast, France. (AP Photo)
Canadian troops in landing crafts approach a stretch of coastline code-named Juno Beach, near Bernieres-sur-mer, as the Allied Normandy invasion gets under way, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Soldiers of the 2nd Canadian Flotilla are carrying bicycles as they disembark their LCI's at a beachhead code-named Juno Beach, at Bernieres-sur-mer, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy on June 6, 1944, . (AP Photo)
Soldiers of the 2nd Canadian Flotilla establish a beachhead code-named Juno Beach, near Bernieres-sur-mer, on the northern coast of France, on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy. (AP Photo)
Men of the American assault troops of the 16th Infantry Regiment, injured while storming a coastal area code-named Omaha Beach during the Allied invasion of the Normandy, wait by the chalk cliffs at Collville-sur-Mer for evacuation to a field hospital for further treatment, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Members of an American landing unit help their exhausted comrades ashore during the Normandy invasion, June 6, 1944. The men reached the zone code-named Utah Beach, near Sainte Mere Eglise, on a life raft after their landing craft was hit and sunk by German coastal defenses. (AP Photo/INP Pool/Louis Weintraub)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, U.S. paratroopers fix their static lines before a jump before dawn over Normandy on D-Day June 6, 1944, in France. The decision to launch the airborne attack in darkness instead of waiting for first light was probably one of the few Allied missteps on June 6, and there was much to criticize both in the training and equipment given to paratroopers and glider-borne troops of the 82nd and 101st airborne divisions. Improvements were called for after the invasion; the hard-won knowledge would be used to advantage later. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps)
Bouncing about on the rough waters of the Channel, these landing craft loaded with assault troops head for the shore of the French coast early in the dawn of D-Day, June 6, 1944. In the surprise invasion attack, the allies suffered a minimum loss and have succeeded in cutting a 29-mile wedge in the Cherbourg Penninsular. (AP Photo)
American troops move over the crest of a hill to the interior of Northern France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Men and assault vehicles storm the Normandy Beach of France, as allied landing craft arrive at their destination on D-Day, June 6, 1944. Note men coming ashore in surf and vehicles starting inland. (AP Photo)
Mushrooms of smoke and flame billow out from the giant USS Nevada as the battleship provides artillery support for Allied ground forces in France by hammering enemy installations from her vantage point in the English Channel, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
In this June 6, 1944 file photo, first wave beach battalion Ducks lay low under the fire of Nazi guns on the beach of southern France on D-Day, June 6, 1944 during World War II. One invader operates a walkie talkie radio directing other landing craft to the safest spots for unloading their parties of fighting men. The 64th anniversary of the invasion is marked Friday, June 6, 2008. (AP Photo/File)
Roger Greene, Associated Press Newsfeature Writer in Washington, D.C., was the first seaborned war correspondent to land on the beach of Normandy in the D-Day invasion, France on June 6, 1944, Greene is seen a few days after the landing. He wore a white patch over his right eye, (childhood accident) and made the landing with a broken left wrist, which he encased in a steel-ribbed leather gauntlet. Greene was shouldering a 65-pound rucksack and his water-proof typewriter when he was dump into the channel off the French coast. But he pressed on to the shore and soon landed in a bomb crater where he promptly wrote his first story. (AP Photo)
A fleet of landing craft standing by at an England port ready to receive the invasion troops, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Some of the first assault troops to hit the beachhead hide behind enemy beach obstacles to fire on the Germans, others follow the first tanks plunging through water towards the Normandy shore on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
(1/55)

Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others.

© 2019 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up