Today in History: April 20

UNITED STATES - JUNE 10:  Apollo 16, carrying Apollo astronauts John Young - Commander, Thomas Mattingly - Command and Service Module pilot and Charles Duke - Lunar Module pilot, lifted off from the Kennedy Space Centre, Cape Canaveral, Florida, on 16th April 1972. It was the fifth successful Apollo lunar landing mission and astronauts Young and Duke became the ninth and tenth men to walk on the Moon. Mattingly remained in lunar orbit while they were on the surface.  (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)

In 1972, Apollo 16’s lunar module, carrying astronauts John W. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr., landed on the moon. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images) (SSPL via Getty Images/Science & Society Picture Librar)

FILE - In this April 20, 1999 file photo members of a police SWAT march to Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., as they prepare to do a final search of the school. Classes are canceled Tuesday, April 20, 2010 at Columbine High School on the anniversary of the 1999 shootings. Twelve students and a teacher died in the shootings before two teenage gunmen committed suicide. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)

In 1999, the Columbine High School massacre took place in Colorado as two students, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, shot and killed 12 classmates and one teacher before taking their own lives. In this 1999 file photo members of a police SWAT march to the school as they prepare to do a final search. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File) (AP/ED ANDRIESKI)

FILE - In this April 21, 2010, file photo, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns in the Gulf of Mexico following an explosion that killed 11 workers and caused the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history. A federal judge in New Orleans granted final approval on Monday, April 4, 2016, to an estimated $20 billion settlement, resolving years of litigation over the spill. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

In 2010, an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil platform, leased by BP, killed 11 workers and caused a blow-out that began spewing an estimated 200 million gallons of crude into the Gulf of Mexico. (The well was finally capped nearly three months later, on July 15.) (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File) (AP)

FILE - In this file photo dated Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2003, an unidentified housekeeper, passes by a picture of famous film director Leni Riefenstahl on the wall in Riefenstahl's home in Poecking, Germany, after she died Monday at the age of 101.  A German cultural foundation said Monday Feb. 12, 2018, that it has been bequeathed photos, films, manuscripts, letters and files from the estate of Leni Riefenstahl, the legendary filmmaker best known for the propaganda movies she made for Nazi Germany. (AP Photo/Jan Pitman, FILE)
In 1938, “Olympia,” Leni Riefenstahl’s documentary about the 1936 Berlin Olympic games, was first shown in Nazi Germany. FILE – In this file photo dated Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2003, an unidentified housekeeper, passes by a picture of famous film director Leni Riefenstahl on the wall in Riefenstahl’s home in Poecking, Germany, after she died Monday at the age of 101. A German cultural foundation said Monday Feb. 12, 2018, that it has been bequeathed photos, films, manuscripts, letters and files from the estate of Leni Riefenstahl, the legendary filmmaker best known for the propaganda movies she made for Nazi Germany. (AP Photo/Jan Pitman, FILE) (AP/Jan Pitman)
FILE - This April 15, 2013 file photo shows the headquarters for National Public Radio (NPR) on North Capitol Street in Washington. NPR has adopted new measures to improve its workplace culture, following an independent investigation into sex harassment issues stemming from the ouster of a top executive. The measures include changes in management structure, a diversity committee, and pay audits to assess fairness. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
In 1971, National Public Radio made its on-air debut with live coverage of a U.S. Senate hearing on the Vietnam War. FILE – This April 15, 2013 file photo shows the headquarters for National Public Radio (NPR) on North Capitol Street in Washington. NPR has adopted new measures to improve its workplace culture, following an independent investigation into sex harassment issues stemming from the ouster of a top executive. The measures include changes in management structure, a diversity committee, and pay audits to assess fairness. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) (AP/Charles Dharapak)
FILE - This undated photo shows romaine lettuce in Houston. On Friday, June 1, 2018, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it wasn’t able to identify a contamination source for an E. coli outbreak that prompted it to warn people to avoid romaine lettuce in the fall of 2018. (Steve Campbell/Houston Chronicle via AP)
In 2018, U.S. health officials told consumers to throw away any store-bought romaine lettuce and warned restaurants not to serve it amid an E. coli outbreak that had sickened more than 50 people in several states. FILE – This undated photo shows romaine lettuce in Houston. On Friday, June 1, 2018, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it wasn’t able to identify a contamination source for an E. coli outbreak that prompted it to warn people to avoid romaine lettuce in the fall of 2018. (Steve Campbell/Houston Chronicle via AP) (AP/Steve Campbell)
Maryland's new license plate design. (Photo courtesy Maryland governor's office)
In 1977, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Wooley v. Maynard, ruled 6-3 that car owners could refuse to display state mottoes on license plates, such as New Hampshire’s “Live Free or Die.” Maryland’s new license plate design. (Photo courtesy Maryland governor’s office) ((Photo courtesy Maryland governo)
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UNITED STATES - JUNE 10:  Apollo 16, carrying Apollo astronauts John Young - Commander, Thomas Mattingly - Command and Service Module pilot and Charles Duke - Lunar Module pilot, lifted off from the Kennedy Space Centre, Cape Canaveral, Florida, on 16th April 1972. It was the fifth successful Apollo lunar landing mission and astronauts Young and Duke became the ninth and tenth men to walk on the Moon. Mattingly remained in lunar orbit while they were on the surface.  (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
FILE - In this April 20, 1999 file photo members of a police SWAT march to Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., as they prepare to do a final search of the school. Classes are canceled Tuesday, April 20, 2010 at Columbine High School on the anniversary of the 1999 shootings. Twelve students and a teacher died in the shootings before two teenage gunmen committed suicide. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)
FILE - In this April 21, 2010, file photo, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns in the Gulf of Mexico following an explosion that killed 11 workers and caused the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history. A federal judge in New Orleans granted final approval on Monday, April 4, 2016, to an estimated $20 billion settlement, resolving years of litigation over the spill. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
FILE - In this file photo dated Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2003, an unidentified housekeeper, passes by a picture of famous film director Leni Riefenstahl on the wall in Riefenstahl's home in Poecking, Germany, after she died Monday at the age of 101.  A German cultural foundation said Monday Feb. 12, 2018, that it has been bequeathed photos, films, manuscripts, letters and files from the estate of Leni Riefenstahl, the legendary filmmaker best known for the propaganda movies she made for Nazi Germany. (AP Photo/Jan Pitman, FILE)
FILE - This April 15, 2013 file photo shows the headquarters for National Public Radio (NPR) on North Capitol Street in Washington. NPR has adopted new measures to improve its workplace culture, following an independent investigation into sex harassment issues stemming from the ouster of a top executive. The measures include changes in management structure, a diversity committee, and pay audits to assess fairness. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
FILE - This undated photo shows romaine lettuce in Houston. On Friday, June 1, 2018, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it wasn’t able to identify a contamination source for an E. coli outbreak that prompted it to warn people to avoid romaine lettuce in the fall of 2018. (Steve Campbell/Houston Chronicle via AP)
Maryland's new license plate design. (Photo courtesy Maryland governor's office)

Today in History

Today is Saturday, April 20, the 110th day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On April 20, 1999, the Columbine High School massacre took place in Colorado as two students shot and killed 12 classmates and one teacher before taking their own lives.

On this date:

In 1898, the United States moved closer to war with Spain as President William McKinley signed a congressional resolution passed the day before recognizing Cuban independence and authorizing U.S. military intervention to achieve that goal.

In 1914, the Ludlow Massacre took place when the Colorado National Guard opened fire on a tent colony of striking miners; about 20 (accounts vary) strikers, women and children died.

In 1938, “Olympia,” Leni Riefenstahl’s documentary about the 1936 Berlin Olympic games, was first shown in Nazi Germany.

In 1948, United Auto Workers president Walter P. Reuther was shot and seriously wounded at his home in Detroit.

In 1971, the Supreme Court unanimously upheld the use of busing to achieve racial desegregation in schools. National Public Radio made its on-air debut with live coverage of a U.S. Senate hearing on the Vietnam War.

In 1972, Apollo 16’s lunar module, carrying astronauts John W. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr., landed on the moon.

In 1977, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Wooley v. Maynard, ruled 6-3 that car owners could refuse to display state mottoes on license plates, such as New Hampshire’s “Live Free or Die.”

In 1986, following an absence of six decades, Russian-born pianist Vladimir Horowitz performed in the Soviet Union to a packed audience at the Grand Hall of the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow.

In 1988, gunmen who had hijacked a Kuwait Airways jumbo jet were allowed safe passage out of Algeria under an agreement that freed the remaining 31 hostages and ended a 15-day siege in which two passengers were slain.

In 1992, the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert for AIDS Awareness took place at London’s Wembley Stadium. Comedian Benny Hill died in his Greater London flat at age 68.

In 2003, U.S. Army forces took control of Baghdad from the Marines in a changing of the guard that thinned the military presence in the capital.

In 2010, an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil platform, leased by BP, killed 11 workers and caused a blow-out that began spewing an estimated 200 million gallons of crude into the Gulf of Mexico. (The well was finally capped nearly three months later.)

Ten years ago: In Geneva, the United Nations opened its first anti-racism conference in eight years; dozens of Western diplomats walked out as Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (ah-muh-DEE’-neh-zhahd) called Israel the “most cruel and repressive racist regime.” (Nine countries, including the United States and Israel, were already boycotting the conference.) Medical student Philip Markoff was arrested in the death of Julissa Brisman, a masseuse he’d met through Craigslist and whose body was found in a Boston hotel. (Markoff, who also was accused of robbing two other women, took his own life while in jail in August 2010 as he awaited trial in Brisman’s death.)

Five years ago: Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, the boxer whose wrongful murder conviction in New Jersey became an international symbol of racial injustice, died in Toronto at age 76.

One year ago: U.S. health officials told consumers to throw away any store-bought romaine lettuce and warned restaurants not to serve it amid an E. coli outbreak that had sickened more than 50 people in several states. Wells Fargo agreed to pay $1 billion to federal regulators to settle charges stemming from misconduct at its mortgage and auto lending businesses; it was the latest punishment levied against the banking giant for widespread customer abuses. The Democratic Party filed a lawsuit accusing the Donald Trump presidential campaign, Russia, WikiLeaks and Trump’s son and son-in-law of conspiring to undercut Democrats in the 2016 election by stealing tens of thousands of emails and documents.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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