Today in History: March 12

FILE - This undated file photo shows Juliette Gordon Low of Savannah, Ga. Low founded the U.S. Girl Scout movement in 1912 and lived to see the organization reach a membership of more than 168,000. She died in 1927. Low's original registration book from March of 1912 shows 102 recruits. Now a century has passed and millions of Americans have taken the Girl Scout promise, sold Samoas and Thin Mints by the truckload and gone on to careers from CEOs to astronauts. (AP Photo/File)
On March 12, 1912, the Girl Scouts of the USA had its origins as Juliette Gordon Low of Savannah, Georgia, founded the first American troop of the Girl Guides. (AP Photo/File) (AP)
President Franklin D. Roosevelt talks to the nation in a fireside chat from the White House in this November 1937 photo.  FDR introduced his radio talks to explain administration policies and to appeal to the people for support for them during the difficult 1930's.  (AP Photo)
In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered the first of his 30 radio addresses that came to be known as “fireside chats,” telling Americans what was being done to deal with the nation’s economic crisis. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
During a ceremony in Vienna on March 15, 1938 a delegation of Sudeten Germans greet Adolf Hitler and Dr. Arthur Seyss-Inquart, right. (AP Photo) --- Waehrend einer Feier auf den Heldenplatz in Wien am 15. Maerz, 1938 gruessen die Sudetendeutsche Abordnung Adolf Hitler. Rechts von Adolf Hitler steht der Reichsstatthalter Dr. Seyss-Inquart. Adolf Hitler verkuendet auf dem Heldenplatz den "Anschluss" Oesterreichs an Deutschland. (AP Photo)
In 1938, the Anschluss merging Austria with Nazi Germany took place as German forces crossed the border between the two countries. (AP Photo) (AP)
While President Bill Clinton looks on, Janet Reno takes the oath as attorney general during a ceremony at the White House in Washington on March 12, 1993. Supreme Court Justice Byron White administered the oath to Reno who became the nation’s first female attorney general. (AP Photo/Barry Thumma)
In 1993, Janet Reno was sworn in as the first female U.S. attorney general. (AP Photo/Barry Thumma) (AP/Barry Thumma)
Elizabeth Smart, right, walks out of the federal courthouse with her mother Lois Smart after testifying at a competency hearing for her alleged kidnapper,  Brian David Mitchell, Oct. 1 2009, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Colin Braley)
In 2003, Elizabeth Smart, the 15-year-old girl who’d vanished from her bedroom nine months earlier, was found alive in a Salt Lake City suburb with two drifters, Brian David Mitchell and Wanda Barzee, who are serving prison terms for kidnapping her. (AP Photo/Colin Braley) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Colin E. Braley)
FILE - This 1978 file photo shows serial killer John Wayne Gacy. Detectives who have long wondered if Gacy killed others besides the 33 young men he was convicted of murdering may soon get to search for bodies underneath an apartment complex where his late mother once lived, a law enforcement official said Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/File)
In 1980, a Chicago jury found John Wayne Gacy Jr. guilty of the murders of 33 men and boys. (The next day, Gacy was sentenced to death; he was executed in May 1994.) FILE – This 1978 file photo shows serial killer John Wayne Gacy. Detectives who have long wondered if Gacy killed others besides the 33 young men he was convicted of murdering may soon get to search for bodies underneath an apartment complex where his late mother once lived, a law enforcement official said Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/File) (AP)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
In 2009, Disgraced financier Bernard Madoff pleaded guilty in New York to pulling off perhaps the biggest swindle in Wall Street history. (Getty Images/Mario Tama)
A lone skier crosses the Mall in front of the Washington Monument, March 14, 1993. Much of downtown Washington was deserted Sunday morning as they city began to recover from one of the biggest winter storms in recent years. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)
In 1993, A three-day blizzard that came to be known as “The Storm of the Century” began inundating the eastern third of the U.S. A lone skier crosses the Mall in front of the Washington Monument, March 14, 1993. Much of downtown Washington was deserted Sunday morning as they city began to recover from one of the biggest winter storms in recent years. (AP Photo/Doug Mills) (AP/Doug Mills)
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FILE - This undated file photo shows Juliette Gordon Low of Savannah, Ga. Low founded the U.S. Girl Scout movement in 1912 and lived to see the organization reach a membership of more than 168,000. She died in 1927. Low's original registration book from March of 1912 shows 102 recruits. Now a century has passed and millions of Americans have taken the Girl Scout promise, sold Samoas and Thin Mints by the truckload and gone on to careers from CEOs to astronauts. (AP Photo/File)
President Franklin D. Roosevelt talks to the nation in a fireside chat from the White House in this November 1937 photo.  FDR introduced his radio talks to explain administration policies and to appeal to the people for support for them during the difficult 1930's.  (AP Photo)
During a ceremony in Vienna on March 15, 1938 a delegation of Sudeten Germans greet Adolf Hitler and Dr. Arthur Seyss-Inquart, right. (AP Photo) --- Waehrend einer Feier auf den Heldenplatz in Wien am 15. Maerz, 1938 gruessen die Sudetendeutsche Abordnung Adolf Hitler. Rechts von Adolf Hitler steht der Reichsstatthalter Dr. Seyss-Inquart. Adolf Hitler verkuendet auf dem Heldenplatz den "Anschluss" Oesterreichs an Deutschland. (AP Photo)
While President Bill Clinton looks on, Janet Reno takes the oath as attorney general during a ceremony at the White House in Washington on March 12, 1993. Supreme Court Justice Byron White administered the oath to Reno who became the nation’s first female attorney general. (AP Photo/Barry Thumma)
Elizabeth Smart, right, walks out of the federal courthouse with her mother Lois Smart after testifying at a competency hearing for her alleged kidnapper,  Brian David Mitchell, Oct. 1 2009, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Colin Braley)
FILE - This 1978 file photo shows serial killer John Wayne Gacy. Detectives who have long wondered if Gacy killed others besides the 33 young men he was convicted of murdering may soon get to search for bodies underneath an apartment complex where his late mother once lived, a law enforcement official said Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/File)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
A lone skier crosses the Mall in front of the Washington Monument, March 14, 1993. Much of downtown Washington was deserted Sunday morning as they city began to recover from one of the biggest winter storms in recent years. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

Today is Tuesday, March 12, the 71st day of 2019.

Today’s Highlights in History:

On March 12, 1864, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant assumed command as General-in-Chief of the Union armies in the Civil War.

On this date:

In 1912, the Girl Scouts of the USA had its beginnings as Juliette Gordon Low of Savannah, Georgia, founded the first American troop of the Girl Guides.

In 1914, American inventor George Westinghouse died in New York at age 67.

In 1923, inventor Lee De Forest publicly demonstrated his sound-on-movie-film system, called “Phonofilm,” in New York.

In 1925, Chinese revolutionary leader Sun Yat-sen died in Beijing.

In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered the first of his 30 radio addresses that came to be known as “fireside chats,” telling Americans what was being done to deal with the nation’s economic crisis.

In 1938, the Anschluss merging Austria with Nazi Germany took place as German forces crossed the border between the two countries.

In 1947, President Harry S. Truman announced what became known as the “Truman Doctrine” to help Greece and Turkey resist Communism.

In 1955, legendary jazz musician Charlie “Bird” Parker died in New York at age 34.

In 1971, Hafez Assad was confirmed as president of Syria in a referendum.

In 1980, a Chicago jury found John Wayne Gacy Jr. guilty of the murders of 33 men and boys. (The next day, Gacy was sentenced to death; he was executed in May 1994.)

In 1993, Janet Reno was sworn in as the first female U.S. attorney general. A three-day blizzard that came to be known as “The Storm of the Century” began inundating the eastern third of the U.S. A series of bombings in Mumbai, India, killed 257 people (the explosions were allegedly masterminded by India’s most wanted man, Dawood Ibrahim).

In 2003, Elizabeth Smart, the 15-year-old girl who vanished from her bedroom nine months earlier, was found alive in a Salt Lake City suburb with two drifters, Brian David Mitchell and Wanda Barzee. (Mitchell is serving a life sentence; Barzee was released from prison in September 2018.)

Ten years ago: Disgraced financier Bernard Madoff pleaded guilty in New York to pulling off perhaps the biggest swindle in Wall Street history. The Iraqi journalist who’d thrown his shoes at President George W. Bush received a three-year sentence. (Muntadhar al-Zeidi ended up serving nine months.) Lindsey Vonn became the first American woman to win the super-G season finale at the World Cup finals in Are, Sweden.

Five years ago: With Ukraine’s interim prime minister, Arseniy Yatsenyuk (ahr-SEHN’-ee yaht-sehn-YOOK’), at his side, President Barack Obama said the United States would “completely reject” a referendum in Crimea opening the door for the Ukrainian peninsula to join Russia. In New York City, a gas explosion destroyed two five-story East Harlem apartment buildings, killing eight people and injuring more than 60.

One year ago: Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee said they’d completed a draft report concluding that there was no collusion or coordination between Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and Russia. British Prime Minister Theresa May said Russia was “highly likely” to blame for poisoning a former spy and his daughter in an English city with a military-grade nerve agent. Two package bomb blasts a few miles apart killed a teenager and wounded two women in Austin less than two weeks after a similar attack left a man dead in another part of the Texas capital. (The attacks were part of a series of bombings that killed two people and wounded four others; the suspect, Mark Conditt, died after detonating a bomb in his SUV as officers moved in.) After a 46-year career at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, conductor James Levine was fired; an investigation had found evidence of sexual abuse and harassment. A dog died on a United Airlines plane after a flight attendant told the dog’s owner to put the pet carrier in the overhead bin.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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