Today in History: Feb. 11

Costumed interpreter Richard Evans, as Britain's King Henry VIII, poses for photographs beside a close copy of a portrait painted during Henry's reign by the German artist Hans Holbein, at Hampton Court Palace, on the outskirts of London, Thursday, April 9, 2009.  The original painting did not survive, with this copy painting being made around 1540 by an artist in the circle of Hans Holbein.  During 2009, King Henry VIII's most famous royal residence plays host to 'Henry VIII: heads and hearts' a year-long programme of events and celebratory activities to mark the Tudor monarch's accession to the throne.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
In 1531, the Church of England grudgingly accepted King Henry VIII as its supreme head. Costumed interpreter Richard Evans, as Britain’s King Henry VIII, poses for photographs beside a close copy of a portrait painted during Henry’s reign by the German artist Hans Holbein, at Hampton Court Palace, on the outskirts of London, Thursday, April 9, 2009. The original painting did not survive, with this copy painting being made around 1540 by an artist in the circle of Hans Holbein. During 2009, King Henry VIII’s most famous royal residence plays host to ‘Henry VIII: heads and hearts’ a year-long programme of events and celebratory activities to mark the Tudor monarch’s accession to the throne. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/MATT DUNHAM)
vatican easter
In 1929, the Lateran Treaty was signed, with Italy recognizing the independence and sovereignty of Vatican City. It is the smallest internationally recognized independent state in the world in terms of size and population. In this photo, a large crowd is seen in St. Peter’s Square, Vatican City. A crowd of more than 100,000 was overflowing from the cobblestoned square, and many more Romans, tourists and pilgrims were still streaming in. (AP/Alessandra Tarantino)
FILE - In this Feb. 12, 1937 file photo, strikers at the General Motors Fisher body plant in Flint, Mich., wave U.S. flags during the Great Depression. At its peak in the early 1970s, GM employed 80,000 people in Flint who cashed paychecks strengthened by the United Auto Workers union born in the city. Some 200,000 people lived in the city's limits, alongside sprawling factories, booming commerce, model schools and thriving arts. (AP Photo/File)
In 1937, a six-week-old sit-down strike against General Motors ended, with the company agreeing to recognize the United Automobile Workers Union. In this Feb. 12, 1937 file photo, strikers at the General Motors Fisher body plant in Flint, Mich., wave U.S. flags during the Great Depression. At its peak in the early 1970s, GM employed 80,000 people in Flint who cashed paychecks strengthened by the United Auto Workers union born in the city. Some 200,000 people lived in the city’s limits, alongside sprawling factories, booming commerce, model schools and thriving arts. (AP Photo/File) (AP)
British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and Soviet Premier Josef Stalin sit on the patio of Livadia Palace, Yalta, Crimea, Feb. 4, 1945. (AP Photo)
In 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin signed the Yalta Agreement, in which Stalin agreed to declare war against Imperial Japan following Nazi Germany’s capitulation. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and Soviet Premier Josef Stalin sit on the patio of Livadia Palace, Yalta, Crimea, on Feb. 4, 1945. (AP Photo) (AP)
Nelson Mandela
In 1990, South African black activist Nelson Mandela was freed after 27 years in captivity. Mandela was an anti-apartheid revolutionary and politician who served as the first President of South Africa in the in the mid to late 1990’s. Mandela died Dec. 5, 2013 at the age of 95. (AP Photo/Theana Calitz-Bilt, Pool, File)   (AP)
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In 2012, on the eve of the Grammy’s, pop singer Whitney Houston, 48, was found dead in a hotel room in Beverly Hills, California. In this March 3, 1988, photo, Whitney Houston poses with her Grammy at the annual Grammy Awards presentation in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File) (AP)
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In 2013, Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation during a routine morning meeting of Vatican cardinals. (The 85-year-old pontiff was succeeded by Pope Francis.) This April 19, 2005 file photo shows Pope Benedict XVI greeting the crowd from the central balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica moments after
being elected, at the Vatican. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis/FILE) (AP)
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Costumed interpreter Richard Evans, as Britain's King Henry VIII, poses for photographs beside a close copy of a portrait painted during Henry's reign by the German artist Hans Holbein, at Hampton Court Palace, on the outskirts of London, Thursday, April 9, 2009.  The original painting did not survive, with this copy painting being made around 1540 by an artist in the circle of Hans Holbein.  During 2009, King Henry VIII's most famous royal residence plays host to 'Henry VIII: heads and hearts' a year-long programme of events and celebratory activities to mark the Tudor monarch's accession to the throne.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
vatican easter
FILE - In this Feb. 12, 1937 file photo, strikers at the General Motors Fisher body plant in Flint, Mich., wave U.S. flags during the Great Depression. At its peak in the early 1970s, GM employed 80,000 people in Flint who cashed paychecks strengthened by the United Auto Workers union born in the city. Some 200,000 people lived in the city's limits, alongside sprawling factories, booming commerce, model schools and thriving arts. (AP Photo/File)
British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and Soviet Premier Josef Stalin sit on the patio of Livadia Palace, Yalta, Crimea, Feb. 4, 1945. (AP Photo)
Nelson Mandela
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Today is Monday, Feb. 11, the 42nd day of 2019. There are 323 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

 On Feb. 11, 1990, South African black activist Nelson Mandela was freed after 27 years in captivity.

On this date:

In 1531, the Church of England grudgingly accepted King Henry VIII as its supreme head.

In 1929, the Lateran Treaty was signed, with Italy recognizing the independence and sovereignty of Vatican City.

In 1937, a six-week-old sit-down strike against General Motors ended, with the company agreeing to recognize the United Automobile Workers Union.

In 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin signed the Yalta Agreement, in which Stalin agreed to declare war against Imperial Japan following Nazi Germany’s capitulation.

In 1963, American author and poet Sylvia Plath was found dead in her London flat, a suicide; she was 30.

In 1968, New York City’s fourth and current Madison Square Garden, located on Manhattan’s West Side at the site of what used to be the Pennsylvania Station building, opened with a “Salute to the USO” hosted by Bob Hope and Bing Crosby. (The same evening, the New York Rangers played their final game at the third Garden, tying the Detroit Red Wings 3-3.)

In 1979, followers of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (hoh-MAY’-nee) seized power in Iran.

In 1986, Soviet dissident Natan Sharansky was released by the Soviet Union after nine years of captivity as part of an East-West prisoner exchange.

In 2006, Vice President Dick Cheney accidentally shot and wounded Harry Whittington, a companion during a weekend quail-hunting trip in Texas.

In 2008, the Pentagon charged Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (HAH’-leed shayk moh-HAH’-med) and five other detainees at Guantanamo Bay with murder and war crimes in connection with the Sept. 11 attacks.

In 2012, pop singer Whitney Houston, 48, was found dead in a hotel room bathtub in Beverly Hills, California.

In 2013, with a few words in Latin, Pope Benedict XVI did what no pope had done in more than half a millennium: announced his resignation. The bombshell came during a routine morning meeting of Vatican cardinals. (The 85-year-old pontiff was succeeded by Pope Francis.)

Ten years ago: The nation’s top bankers went before the House Financial Services Committee, pledging to build public trust with greater lending and fewer perks. All-Star shortstop Miguel Tejada pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about steroids in baseball. (He was sentenced to a year’s probation.) Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., who first went to Congress in 1955, became the longest-serving member of the U.S. House of Representatives. President Robert Mugabe (moo-GAH’-bay) swore in longtime rival Morgan Tsvangirai (SVAHNG’-ur-eye) as Zimbabwe’s prime minister.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama, during a joint White House news conference with French President Francois Hollande, vowed to come down like “a ton of bricks” on businesses that violated Iranian sanctions while nuclear negotiations were under way, and conceded “enormous frustration” with stalled Syrian peace talks. At the Sochi Games, Carina Vogt of Germany won women’s ski jumping’s first-ever Olympic gold medal.

One year ago: A Russian passenger plane crashed into a snowy field six minutes after taking off from Moscow, killing all 65 passengers and six crew members; investigators would blame human error, saying the pilots had received flawed air speed readings after failing to turn on a heating unit for the measurement equipment. Amid swirling winds, 17-year-old snowboarder Red Gerard won the United States’ first gold medal of the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea, capturing the men’s slopestyle event. Singer Vic Damone, who possessed what Frank Sinatra once called “the best pipes in the business,” died in Florida at the age of 89.

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© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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