Today in History: Jan. 29

1845:  'Open here I flung the shutter, when with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore.......'  From 'The Raven' by Edgar Allan Poe. Original Publication: The Raven - pub. 1845  (Photo by Rischgitz/Getty Images)
On Jan. 29, 1845, Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven” was first published in the New York Evening Mirror. In this image: ‘Open here I flung the shutter, when with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore…….’ From ‘The Raven’ by Edgar Allan Poe. Original Publication: The Raven – pub. 1845 (Photo by Rischgitz/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Rischgitz)
In this Jan. 29, 2010 photo, the National Historic Landmark where the Northwestern Shoshone suffered a massacre in 1863 is seen near Preston, Idaho. Tribal members descend each year to the burial ground near the Bear River where soldiers felled hundreds of their ancestors in one of American history's bloodiest but little remembered massacres. (AP Photo/Jessie L. Bonner)
In 1863, the Bear River Massacre took place as the U.S. Army attacked Shoshone in present-day Idaho. The New York Stock & Exchange Board changed its name to the New York Stock Exchange. In this Jan. 29, 2010 photo, the National Historic Landmark where the Northwestern Shoshone suffered a massacre in 1863 is seen near Preston, Idaho. Tribal members descend each year to the burial ground near the Bear River where soldiers felled hundreds of their ancestors in one of American history’s bloodiest but little remembered massacres. (AP Photo/Jessie L. Bonner) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Jessie L. Bonner)
Women turn out in large numbers, some carrying placards reading "We want beer," for the anti prohibition parade and demonstration in Newark, N.J., Oct. 28, 1932.  More than 20,000 people took part in the mass demand for the repeal of the 18th Amendment.  (AP Photo)
In 1919, the ratification of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution, which launched Prohibition, was certified by Acting Secretary of State Frank L. Polk. Women turned out in large numbers, some carrying placards reading “We want beer” for the anti prohibition parade and demonstration in Newark, N.J., Oct. 28, 1932. More than 20,000 people took part in the mass demand for the repeal of the 18th Amendment. (AP Photo) (AP)
File - In this June 12, 1939 file photo, these baseball stars were pictured as they attended the dedication and their induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Front row; Eddie Collins, Babe Ruth, Connie Mack, Cy Young; Rear row left to right; Hans Wagner, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Tris Speaker, Napoleon Lajoie, George Sisler and Walter Johnson. A baseball with the signatures of Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner and eight other legends of the game has sold for more than $600,000. The players all signed the ball on the same day in 1939, when they had gathered to become the first class to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame. SCP Auctions said Monday, Aug. 13, 2018, that it has sold for just over $623,000. That crushes the previous record of $345,000 for a signed ball, set in 2013. (AP Photo/File)

In 1936, the first inductees of baseball’s Hall of Fame, including Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth, were named in Cooperstown, New York. In this June 12, 1939 file photo, these baseball stars were pictured as they attended the dedication and their induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Front row; Eddie Collins, Babe Ruth, Connie Mack, Cy Young; Rear row left to right; Hans Wagner, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Tris Speaker, Napoleon Lajoie, George Sisler and Walter Johnson. A baseball with the signatures of Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner and eight other legends of the game has sold for more than $600,000. The players all signed the ball on the same day in 1939, when they had gathered to become the first class to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame. (AP Photo/File) (AP/Anonymous)

UNDATED:  This image taken from the Federal Bureau of Investigations Ten Most Wanted Fugitive Webpage shows fugitive Eric Robert Rudolph as captured. Authorities said May 31, 2003 that Rudolph was captured in the early morning hours by local Police Officer Jeffrey Postell in Murphy, North Carolina, the western area of the state where Rudolph has eluded capture for the past five years. His identity was confirmed through fingerprints according to the FBI. Rudolph, one-time carpenter who vanished in early 1998, is suspected in a Birmingham, Alabama abortion clinic, which killed an off-duty police officer and disabled a nurse. He was later was charged in the bombing at Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park during the 1996 Summer Olympics, where one person was killed and more than 100 were injured. He was also charged in the 1997 explosions at an abortion clinic and a gay nightclub in the Atlanta area. U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft could decide if Rudolph would get the death penalty.  (Photo by FBI/Getty Images)
In 1998, a bomb rocked an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Alabama, killing security guard Robert Sanderson and critically injuring nurse Emily Lyons. (The bomber, Eric Rudolph, was captured in May 2003 and is serving a life sentence.)     (Getty Images/Getty Images)
In 2002, In his first State of the Union address, President George W. Bush said terrorists were still threatening America — and he warned of “an axis of evil” consisting of North Korea, Iran and Iraq. In this Jan. 29, 2002 file photo President George W. Bush gives his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington, during which he grouped Iran, Iraq and North Korea together as the West’s most dangerous foe, and called them an “axis of evil.” (AP Photo/Doug Mills, File)
Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich heads to federal court for his sentencing hearing in Chicago, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2011.   Blagojevich was convicted earlier this year on 18 corruption counts, including trying to auction off President Barack Obama's old U.S. Senate seat.   (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Ten years ago, the Illinois Senate voted, 59-0, to convict Gov. Rod Blagojevich (blah-GOY’-uh-vich) of abuse of power and throw him out of office nearly two months after the second-term Democrat’s arrest on charges of trying to sell Barack Obama’s vacant Senate seat. Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich heads to federal court for his sentencing hearing in Chicago, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2011. Blagojevich was convicted earlier this year on 18 corruption counts, including trying to auction off President Barack Obama’s old U.S. Senate seat. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Paul Beaty)
(1/7)
1845:  'Open here I flung the shutter, when with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore.......'  From 'The Raven' by Edgar Allan Poe. Original Publication: The Raven - pub. 1845  (Photo by Rischgitz/Getty Images)
In this Jan. 29, 2010 photo, the National Historic Landmark where the Northwestern Shoshone suffered a massacre in 1863 is seen near Preston, Idaho. Tribal members descend each year to the burial ground near the Bear River where soldiers felled hundreds of their ancestors in one of American history's bloodiest but little remembered massacres. (AP Photo/Jessie L. Bonner)
Women turn out in large numbers, some carrying placards reading "We want beer," for the anti prohibition parade and demonstration in Newark, N.J., Oct. 28, 1932.  More than 20,000 people took part in the mass demand for the repeal of the 18th Amendment.  (AP Photo)
File - In this June 12, 1939 file photo, these baseball stars were pictured as they attended the dedication and their induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Front row; Eddie Collins, Babe Ruth, Connie Mack, Cy Young; Rear row left to right; Hans Wagner, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Tris Speaker, Napoleon Lajoie, George Sisler and Walter Johnson. A baseball with the signatures of Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner and eight other legends of the game has sold for more than $600,000. The players all signed the ball on the same day in 1939, when they had gathered to become the first class to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame. SCP Auctions said Monday, Aug. 13, 2018, that it has sold for just over $623,000. That crushes the previous record of $345,000 for a signed ball, set in 2013. (AP Photo/File)
UNDATED:  This image taken from the Federal Bureau of Investigations Ten Most Wanted Fugitive Webpage shows fugitive Eric Robert Rudolph as captured. Authorities said May 31, 2003 that Rudolph was captured in the early morning hours by local Police Officer Jeffrey Postell in Murphy, North Carolina, the western area of the state where Rudolph has eluded capture for the past five years. His identity was confirmed through fingerprints according to the FBI. Rudolph, one-time carpenter who vanished in early 1998, is suspected in a Birmingham, Alabama abortion clinic, which killed an off-duty police officer and disabled a nurse. He was later was charged in the bombing at Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park during the 1996 Summer Olympics, where one person was killed and more than 100 were injured. He was also charged in the 1997 explosions at an abortion clinic and a gay nightclub in the Atlanta area. U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft could decide if Rudolph would get the death penalty.  (Photo by FBI/Getty Images)
Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich heads to federal court for his sentencing hearing in Chicago, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2011.   Blagojevich was convicted earlier this year on 18 corruption counts, including trying to auction off President Barack Obama's old U.S. Senate seat.   (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

Today is Tuesday, Jan. 29, the 29th day of 2019. There are 336 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Jan. 29, 1936, the first inductees of baseball’s Hall of Fame, including Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth, were named in Cooperstown, New York.

On this date:

In 1820, King George III died at Windsor Castle at age 81; he was succeeded by his son, who became King George IV.

In 1845, Edgar Allan Poe’s famous narrative poem “The Raven” (“Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary…”) was first published in the New York Evening Mirror.

In 1856, Britain’s Queen Victoria introduced the Victoria Cross to reward military acts of valor during the Crimean War.

In 1861, Kansas became the 34th state of the Union.

In 1863, the Bear River Massacre took place as the U.S. Army attacked Shoshone in present-day Idaho. The New York Stock & Exchange Board changed its name to the New York Stock Exchange.

In 1919, the ratification of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution, which launched Prohibition, was certified by Acting Secretary of State Frank L. Polk.

In 1963, the first charter members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame were named in Canton, Ohio (they were enshrined when the Hall opened in September 1963). Poet Robert Frost died in Boston at age 88.

In 1975, a bomb exploded inside the U.S. State Department in Washington, causing considerable damage, but injuring no one; the radical group Weather Underground claimed responsibility.

In 1979, President Jimmy Carter formally welcomed Chinese Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping to the White House, following the establishment of diplomatic relations.

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan announced in a nationally broadcast message that he and Vice President George H.W. Bush would seek re-election in the fall.

In 1998, a bomb rocked an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Alabama, killing security guard Robert Sanderson and critically injuring nurse Emily Lyons. (The bomber, Eric Rudolph, was captured in May 2003 and is serving a life sentence.)

In 2002, In his first State of the Union address, President George W. Bush said terrorists were still threatening America — and he warned of “an axis of evil” consisting of North Korea, Iran and Iraq.

Ten years ago: Declaring that ending pay disparity is not just a women’s issue, President Barack Obama signed The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, giving workers more time to take their pay discrimination cases to court. The Illinois Senate voted, 59-0, to convict Gov. Rod Blagojevich (blah-GOY’-uh-vich) of abuse of power and throw him out of office nearly two months after the second-term Democrat’s arrest on charges of trying to sell Barack Obama’s vacant Senate seat.

Five years ago: The state of Missouri executed Herbert Smulls for the 1991 slaying of jeweler Stephen Honickman in suburban St. Louis.

One year ago: FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, a target of frequent criticism and accusations of bias from President Donald Trump, abruptly stepped down from his position ahead of his planned retirement in the spring. Alex Azar, a former drug company executive and official in George W. Bush’s administration, was sworn in as Trump’s second health secretary. The Cleveland Indians announced that they would remove the Chief Wahoo logo from their uniforms in the coming baseball season, after decades of protests and complaints that the grinning, red-faced caricature was racist.

Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up