PHOTOS: Longest government shutdown in US history

WASHINGTON — The U.S. is in the midst of the longest government shutdown in history. Congressional Democrats and President Donald Trump remain in a standoff over funding for Trump’s border wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, which Trump previously said Mexico would pay for.

See photos from across the country as America navigates the shutdown.

President Donald Trump announces a deal to temporarily reopen the government, in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump announces a deal to temporarily reopen the government, in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci) (AP/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, Jan 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, Jan 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) (AP/Jacquelyn Martin)
An American Airlines jet, left, waits for a Delta Airlines jet to pass by before following it onto the runway at LaGuardia Airport, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in New York. The Federal Aviation Administration reported delays in air travel Friday because of a "slight increase in sick leave" at two East Coast air traffic control facilities. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
An American Airlines jet, left, waits for a Delta Airlines jet to pass by before following it onto the runway at LaGuardia Airport, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in New York. The Federal Aviation Administration reported delays in air travel Friday because of a “slight increase in sick leave” at two East Coast air traffic control facilities. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) (AP/Julio Cortez)
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders listens to a question as she speaks with reporters outside the White House, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders listens to a question as she speaks with reporters outside the White House, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci) (AP/Evan Vucci)
The Capitol iat sunset after the Senate rejected competing Democratic and Republican proposals for ending the partial government shutdown, which is the longest in the nation's history, in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
The Capitol iat sunset after the Senate rejected competing Democratic and Republican proposals for ending the partial government shutdown, which is the longest in the nation’s history, in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) (AP/J. Scott Applewhite)
A door knocker made for the U.S. Forest Service is shown at Western Heritage Co. Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, in Loveland, Colo. Lynch saw online orders collapse almost immediately after the government shut down Dec. 22. The company sells buckles, keychains, commemorative coins and badges to employees of the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management and other agencies. It also sells patches and some clothing. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
A door knocker made for the U.S. Forest Service is shown at Western Heritage Co. Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, in Loveland, Colo. Lynch saw online orders collapse almost immediately after the government shut down Dec. 22. The company sells buckles, keychains, commemorative coins and badges to employees of the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management and other agencies. It also sells patches and some clothing. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) (AP/David Zalubowski)
Maxima Guerrero poses for a photo in Phoenix on Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children see little reason to be hopeful about the latest proposal to extend protections to them as part of President Donald Trump's plan to reopen the federal government. Guerrero, a Phoenix activist who has had Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) protections since 2013, the court challenges, the politics and the perpetual debate involving the program has taken an emotional toll. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Maxima Guerrero poses for a photo in Phoenix on Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children see little reason to be hopeful about the latest proposal to extend protections to them as part of President Donald Trump’s plan to reopen the federal government. Guerrero, a Phoenix activist who has had Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) protections since 2013, the court challenges, the politics and the perpetual debate involving the program has taken an emotional toll. (AP Photo/Matt York) (AP/Matt York)
A furloughed government worker affected by the shutdown holds a sign that reads "I took an oath I want to serve" during a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Protesters held up disposable plates instead of posters to avoid being arrested. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
A furloughed government worker affected by the shutdown holds a sign that reads “I took an oath I want to serve” during a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Protesters held up disposable plates instead of posters to avoid being arrested. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
A furloughed government worker affected by the shutdown holds a sign that reads "Reopen the Government" during a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
A furloughed government worker affected by the shutdown holds a sign that reads “Reopen the Government” during a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Protesters held up disposable plates instead of posters to avoid being arrested. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Protesters held up disposable plates instead of posters to avoid being arrested. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown yell during a protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown yell during a protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Transportation Security Administration employees carry boxes of non perishables and bags of produce received from the Community Food Bank at a drive at Newark Liberty International Airport to help government employees who are working without pay during the partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, in Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
Transportation Security Administration employees carry boxes of non perishables and bags of produce received from the Community Food Bank at a drive at Newark Liberty International Airport to help government employees who are working without pay during the partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, in Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) (AP/Julio Cortez)
Furloughed government workers protest the government shutdown at the door of U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell's office in Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston)
Furloughed government workers protest the government shutdown at the door of U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell’s office in Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston) (AP/Bryan Woolston)
Reese Greer, a furloughed census worker, stands at the locked door of U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell's office in Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019, during a government shutdown protest. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston)
Reese Greer, a furloughed census worker, stands at the locked door of U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell’s office in Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019, during a government shutdown protest. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston) (AP/Bryan Woolston)
McKay, whose father is a furloughed federal worker, decided to share the peanut butter wealth with other federal workers who are not getting paid during the government shutdown. (Courtesy Eric McKay)
McKay, whose father is a furloughed federal worker, decided to share the peanut butter wealth with other federal workers who are not getting paid during the government shutdown. (Courtesy Eric McKay)
Furloughed EPA worker Jeff Herrema holds a sign outside the offices of U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, in Park Hills, Ky., Tuesday, Jan 22, 2019. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston)
Furloughed EPA worker Jeff Herrema holds a sign outside the offices of U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, in Park Hills, Ky., Tuesday, Jan 22, 2019. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston) (AP/Bryan Woolston)
Nancy Pelosi
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., center, smiles as she helps give out food at World Central Kitchen, the not-for-profit organization started by Chef Jose Andres, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, in Washington. The organization devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters, has set up a distribution center just blocks from the U.S. Capitol building to assist those affected by the government shutdown. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Nancy Pelosi, Jose Andres
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., center left, and Chef Jose Andres, center right, arrive to give out food at World Central Kitchen, the not-for-profit organization started by Chef Jose Andres, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, in Washington. The organization devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters, has set up a distribution center just blocks from the U.S. Capitol building to assist those affected by the government shutdown. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Shane Smith, a TSA agent, waits with other furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown, in line for free food and supplies at World Central Kitchen, the not-for-profit organization started by Chef Jose Andres, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019 in Washington. The organization devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters, has set up a distribution center just blocks from the U.S. Capitol building to assist those affected by the government shutdown. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Shane Smith, a TSA agent, waits with other furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown, in line for free food and supplies at World Central Kitchen, the not-for-profit organization started by Chef Jose Andres, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019 in Washington. The organization devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters, has set up a distribution center just blocks from the U.S. Capitol building to assist those affected by the government shutdown. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
“I told my employee not to show up until I call them," said Mina Tamami, who operates Mina's Boutique with her husband. “The past month, nothing. Nobody’s here. It’s like a ghost town." (WTOP/John Domen)
“I told my employee not to show up until I call them,” said Mina Tamami, who operates Mina’s Boutique with her husband in L’Enfant Plaza in downtown D.C. “The past month, nothing. Nobody’s here. It’s like a ghost town.” (WTOP/John Domen) (WTOP/John Domen)
An Air Force bus waits on the plaza of the Capitol after President Donald Trump used his executive power to deny military aircraft to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi just before she was depart to visit troops abroad, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
An Air Force bus waits on the plaza of the Capitol after President Donald Trump used his executive power to deny military aircraft to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi just before she was depart to visit troops abroad, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) (AP/J. Scott Applewhite)
Doris Cochran works on "an ugly sweater," which she is planning to sell, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in her apartment in Arlington, Va., Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most.  (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
Doris Cochran works on “an ugly sweater,” which she is planning to sell, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in her apartment in Arlington, Va., Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz) (AP/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
Doris Cochran holds "an ugly sweater," which she is planning to sell, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in her apartment in Arlington, Va., Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most.  (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
Doris Cochran holds “an ugly sweater,” which she is planning to sell, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in her apartment in Arlington, Va., Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz) (AP/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
Donald Trump
President Donald Trump speaks about the partial government shutdown, immigration and border security in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (AP/Alex Brandon)
FILE- In this Jan. 14, 2019, file photo, bottles, freshly filled with beer, move on a belt at Lakefront Brewery in Milwaukee. Some craft breweries are postponing new beer releases or expansions because they need permission from a federal agency that isn’t open. Such breweries tend to offer new seasonal and special brews frequently, and new beer labels need the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau’s approval to be sold across state lines.(AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger, File)
FILE- In this Jan. 14, 2019, file photo, bottles, freshly filled with beer, move on a belt at Lakefront Brewery in Milwaukee. Some craft breweries are postponing new beer releases or expansions because they need permission from a federal agency that isn’t open. Such breweries tend to offer new seasonal and special brews frequently, and new beer labels need the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau’s approval to be sold across state lines.(AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger, File) (AP/Carrie Antlfinger)
Carlos Gonzalez, right, watches as his daughter and other family members wait in line at a security checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
Carlos Gonzalez, right, watches as his daughter and other family members wait in line at a security checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky) (AP/Lynne Sladky)
A traveler walks through Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
A traveler walks through Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky) (AP/Lynne Sladky)
A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employee works at a security checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employee works at a security checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky) (AP/Lynne Sladky)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, Christine Lamb, president and founder of the nonprofit group Animal House Inc., in nearby Waterford, Conn., delivers bags of donated pet food to Coast Guardsmen helping at a pop-up food pantry created on the grounds of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. Hundreds of Coast Guard civilian and non-civilian employees working at the academy and at other Coast Guard installations have been impacted by the partial federal shutdown and have not received a paycheck in weeks. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, Christine Lamb, president and founder of the nonprofit group Animal House Inc., in nearby Waterford, Conn., delivers bags of donated pet food to Coast Guardsmen helping at a pop-up food pantry created on the grounds of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. Hundreds of Coast Guard civilian and non-civilian employees working at the academy and at other Coast Guard installations have been impacted by the partial federal shutdown and have not received a paycheck in weeks. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh) (AP/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, U.S. Coast Guard Culinary Specialist Jerry Wright, right, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin, second from right, stack boxes of donated cereal at a pop-up food pantry created at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The pantry was created by local Coast Guard-related advocacy groups to help hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard employees to help makes ends meet during the partial federal government shutdown. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, U.S. Coast Guard Culinary Specialist Jerry Wright, right, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin, second from right, stack boxes of donated cereal at a pop-up food pantry created at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The pantry was created by local Coast Guard-related advocacy groups to help hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard employees to help makes ends meet during the partial federal government shutdown. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh) (AP/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, retired U.S. Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, center, speaks with Felicitas Rendon, wife of Rear Adm. James E. Rendon, superintendent of the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. Allen was visiting a pop-up food pantry created at a school to help hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard employees affected by the partial federal government shutdown. Allen called the shutdown a "wound" that's been inflicted "by our own government." (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, retired U.S. Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, center, speaks with Felicitas Rendon, wife of Rear Adm. James E. Rendon, superintendent of the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. Allen was visiting a pop-up food pantry created at a school to help hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard employees affected by the partial federal government shutdown. Allen called the shutdown a “wound” that’s been inflicted “by our own government.” (AP Photo/Susan Haigh) (AP/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, a sign advertises a discount offered by Mr. G's in New London, Conn., to the hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard Employees who work in the area. Located a short distance from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, the restaurant and bar is a popular spot for academy cadets, staff and others. Manager Peter Farnan says he's beginning to see signs of the shutdown, estimating his business has dropped about 10 percent. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, a sign advertises a discount offered by Mr. G’s in New London, Conn., to the hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard Employees who work in the area. Located a short distance from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, the restaurant and bar is a popular spot for academy cadets, staff and others. Manager Peter Farnan says he’s beginning to see signs of the shutdown, estimating his business has dropped about 10 percent. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh) (AP/Susan Haigh)
United States Department of Agriculture employee Lori Lodato, of Wilmington, Mass., display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
United States Department of Agriculture employee Lori Lodato, of Wilmington, Mass., display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) (AP/Steven Senne)
Internal Revenue Service employees Brian Lanouette, of Merrimack, N.H., center right, and Mary Maldonado, of Dracut, Mass., right, join with others as they display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse, in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Internal Revenue Service employees Brian Lanouette, of Merrimack, N.H., center right, and Mary Maldonado, of Dracut, Mass., right, join with others as they display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse, in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) (AP/Steven Senne)
Internal Revenue Service employees, front row from the left, Brian Lanouette, of Merrimack, N.H., Mary Maldonado, of Dracut, Mass., and Maria Zangari, of Haverhill, Mass., display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse, in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Internal Revenue Service employees, front row from the left, Brian Lanouette, of Merrimack, N.H., Mary Maldonado, of Dracut, Mass., and Maria Zangari, of Haverhill, Mass., display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse, in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) (AP/Steven Senne)
Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Ga., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the "Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act" bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Ga., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the “Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act” bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. Susie Lee, D-Nev., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the "Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act" bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. Susie Lee, D-Nev., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the “Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act” bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. Susan Wild, D-Pa., left, accompanied by Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., center, and Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., right, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the "Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act" bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. Susan Wild, D-Pa., left, accompanied by Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., center, and Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., right, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the “Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act” bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., joined by House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., center, and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., left, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, following weekly Whip meeting. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., joined by House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., center, and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., left, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, following weekly Whip meeting. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) (AP/Carolyn Kaster)
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) (AP/Carolyn Kaster)
Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., discusses the government shutdown during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., discusses the government shutdown during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
U.S. Coast Guardsmen and women, who missed their first paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, stand on a 45-foot response boat as they listen to their lieutenant during their shift at Sector Puget Sound base Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. They are part of a multi-mission, around-the-clock group charged with security and search and rescue missions. The Coast Guard is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which is unfunded during the partial government shutdown. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
U.S. Coast Guardsmen and women, who missed their first paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, stand on a 45-foot response boat as they listen to their lieutenant during their shift at Sector Puget Sound base Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. They are part of a multi-mission, around-the-clock group charged with security and search and rescue missions. The Coast Guard is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which is unfunded during the partial government shutdown. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (AP/Elaine Thompson)
A man heading into the Sacramento International Airport passes demonstrators calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end the shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. More than two dozen federal employees and supporters called for an end to the partial government shutdown now in its fourth week. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
A man heading into the Sacramento International Airport passes demonstrators calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end the shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. More than two dozen federal employees and supporters called for an end to the partial government shutdown now in its fourth week. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) (AP/Rich Pedroncelli)
Several dozen federal employees and supporters demonstrated at the Sacramento International Airport calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end then partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Several dozen federal employees and supporters demonstrated at the Sacramento International Airport calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end then partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) (AP/Rich Pedroncelli)
Doors at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in the Henry M. Jackson Federal Building are locked and covered with blinds as a sign posted advises that the office will be closed during the partial government shutdown Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. The shutdown is in its fourth week with no end in sight. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Doors at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in the Henry M. Jackson Federal Building are locked and covered with blinds as a sign posted advises that the office will be closed during the partial government shutdown Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. The shutdown is in its fourth week with no end in sight. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (AP/Elaine Thompson)
Airport operation workers wearing fluorescent safety jackets flipped burgers and hot dogs on a grill set up on a tarmac in front of a plane at Salt Lake City International Airport, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Salt Lake City. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Airport operation workers wearing fluorescent safety jackets flipped burgers and hot dogs on a grill set up on a tarmac in front of a plane at Salt Lake City International Airport, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Salt Lake City. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) (AP/Rick Bowmer)
A tourist is reflected in a window of the closed building housing the Liberty Bell, in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019. The building is closed due to the partial government shutdown. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
A tourist is reflected in a window of the closed building housing the Liberty Bell, in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019. The building is closed due to the partial government shutdown. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) (AP/Matt Rourke)
Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., left, Rep. Tom Malinowski, D-N.J., Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., and other freshmen members of the House of Representatives walk to the Senate side to speak about the government shutdown on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., left, Rep. Tom Malinowski, D-N.J., Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., and other freshmen members of the House of Representatives walk to the Senate side to speak about the government shutdown on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (AP/Alex Brandon)
The White House is seen as snow continues to fall, Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
The White House is seen as snow continues to fall, Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (AP/Alex Brandon)
Park service workers clean the snow outside of Lincoln Memorial, during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president's Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Park service workers clean the snow outside of Lincoln Memorial, during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president’s Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) (AP/Jose Luis Magana)
People play with snow at the National Mall during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president's Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
People play with snow at the National Mall during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president’s Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) (AP/Jose Luis Magana)
The U.S. Capitol is see behind the Peace Monument during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president's Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
The U.S. Capitol is seeing behind the Peace Monument during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president’s Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) (AP/Jose Luis Magana)
An electronic billboard, sponsored by the Democratic Coalition,  shown Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019 in Nicholasville, Ky.  McConnell, who is up for re-election in 2020 in a state where Trump tends to be more popular than he is, sees no other choice than to stand back and let the president who took the country into the shutdown decide how he wants to get out of it. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
An electronic billboard, sponsored by the Democratic Coalition, shown Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019 in Nicholasville, Ky. McConnell, who is up for re-election in 2020 in a state where Trump tends to be more popular than he is, sees no other choice than to stand back and let the president who took the country into the shutdown decide how he wants to get out of it. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley) (AP/Timothy D. Easley)
An image of a boy is painted on the bars of the border wall, in front of coils of razor wire Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, seen from Tijuana, Mexico. The partial government shutdown was on track Friday to become the longest closure in U.S. history as President Donald Trump and nervous Republicans looked for a way out of the mess. A solution couldn't come soon enough for federal workers who got pay statements Friday but no pay. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
An image of a boy is painted on the bars of the border wall, in front of coils of razor wire Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, seen from Tijuana, Mexico. The partial government shutdown was on track Friday to become the longest closure in U.S. history as President Donald Trump and nervous Republicans looked for a way out of the mess. A solution couldn’t come soon enough for federal workers who got pay statements Friday but no pay. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull) (AP/Gregory Bull)
A boy plays as floodlights from the United States filter through the border wall Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, in Tijuana, Mexico. The partial U.S. government shutdown was on track Friday to become the longest closure in U.S. history as President Donald Trump and nervous Republicans look for a way out of the mess. A solution couldn't come soon enough for federal workers who got pay statements Friday but no pay. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
A boy plays as floodlights from the United States filter through the border wall Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, in Tijuana, Mexico. The partial U.S. government shutdown was on track Friday to become the longest closure in U.S. history as President Donald Trump and nervous Republicans look for a way out of the mess. A solution couldn’t come soon enough for federal workers who got pay statements Friday but no pay. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull) (AP/Gregory Bull)
President Donald Trump attends a roundtable discussion on border security with local leaders, Friday Jan. 11, 2019, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
President Donald Trump attends a roundtable discussion on border security with local leaders, Friday Jan. 11, 2019, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) (AP/Jacquelyn Martin)
(1/60)
President Donald Trump announces a deal to temporarily reopen the government, in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, Jan 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
An American Airlines jet, left, waits for a Delta Airlines jet to pass by before following it onto the runway at LaGuardia Airport, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in New York. The Federal Aviation Administration reported delays in air travel Friday because of a "slight increase in sick leave" at two East Coast air traffic control facilities. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders listens to a question as she speaks with reporters outside the White House, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
The Capitol iat sunset after the Senate rejected competing Democratic and Republican proposals for ending the partial government shutdown, which is the longest in the nation's history, in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
A door knocker made for the U.S. Forest Service is shown at Western Heritage Co. Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, in Loveland, Colo. Lynch saw online orders collapse almost immediately after the government shut down Dec. 22. The company sells buckles, keychains, commemorative coins and badges to employees of the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management and other agencies. It also sells patches and some clothing. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Maxima Guerrero poses for a photo in Phoenix on Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children see little reason to be hopeful about the latest proposal to extend protections to them as part of President Donald Trump's plan to reopen the federal government. Guerrero, a Phoenix activist who has had Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) protections since 2013, the court challenges, the politics and the perpetual debate involving the program has taken an emotional toll. (AP Photo/Matt York)
A furloughed government worker affected by the shutdown holds a sign that reads "I took an oath I want to serve" during a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Protesters held up disposable plates instead of posters to avoid being arrested. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
A furloughed government worker affected by the shutdown holds a sign that reads "Reopen the Government" during a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. Protesters held up disposable plates instead of posters to avoid being arrested. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown hold a silent protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown yell during a protest against the ongoing partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Transportation Security Administration employees carry boxes of non perishables and bags of produce received from the Community Food Bank at a drive at Newark Liberty International Airport to help government employees who are working without pay during the partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, in Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
Furloughed government workers protest the government shutdown at the door of U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell's office in Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston)
Reese Greer, a furloughed census worker, stands at the locked door of U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell's office in Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019, during a government shutdown protest. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston)
McKay, whose father is a furloughed federal worker, decided to share the peanut butter wealth with other federal workers who are not getting paid during the government shutdown. (Courtesy Eric McKay)
Furloughed EPA worker Jeff Herrema holds a sign outside the offices of U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, in Park Hills, Ky., Tuesday, Jan 22, 2019. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston)
Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi, Jose Andres
Shane Smith, a TSA agent, waits with other furloughed government workers affected by the shutdown, in line for free food and supplies at World Central Kitchen, the not-for-profit organization started by Chef Jose Andres, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019 in Washington. The organization devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters, has set up a distribution center just blocks from the U.S. Capitol building to assist those affected by the government shutdown. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
“I told my employee not to show up until I call them," said Mina Tamami, who operates Mina's Boutique with her husband. “The past month, nothing. Nobody’s here. It’s like a ghost town." (WTOP/John Domen)
An Air Force bus waits on the plaza of the Capitol after President Donald Trump used his executive power to deny military aircraft to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi just before she was depart to visit troops abroad, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Doris Cochran works on "an ugly sweater," which she is planning to sell, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in her apartment in Arlington, Va., Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most.  (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
Doris Cochran holds "an ugly sweater," which she is planning to sell, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in her apartment in Arlington, Va., Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most.  (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
Donald Trump
FILE- In this Jan. 14, 2019, file photo, bottles, freshly filled with beer, move on a belt at Lakefront Brewery in Milwaukee. Some craft breweries are postponing new beer releases or expansions because they need permission from a federal agency that isn’t open. Such breweries tend to offer new seasonal and special brews frequently, and new beer labels need the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau’s approval to be sold across state lines.(AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger, File)
Carlos Gonzalez, right, watches as his daughter and other family members wait in line at a security checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
A traveler walks through Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employee works at a security checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Miami. The three-day holiday weekend is likely to bring bigger airport crowds. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, Christine Lamb, president and founder of the nonprofit group Animal House Inc., in nearby Waterford, Conn., delivers bags of donated pet food to Coast Guardsmen helping at a pop-up food pantry created on the grounds of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. Hundreds of Coast Guard civilian and non-civilian employees working at the academy and at other Coast Guard installations have been impacted by the partial federal shutdown and have not received a paycheck in weeks. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, U.S. Coast Guard Culinary Specialist Jerry Wright, right, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin, second from right, stack boxes of donated cereal at a pop-up food pantry created at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The pantry was created by local Coast Guard-related advocacy groups to help hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard employees to help makes ends meet during the partial federal government shutdown. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, retired U.S. Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, center, speaks with Felicitas Rendon, wife of Rear Adm. James E. Rendon, superintendent of the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. Allen was visiting a pop-up food pantry created at a school to help hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard employees affected by the partial federal government shutdown. Allen called the shutdown a "wound" that's been inflicted "by our own government." (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, a sign advertises a discount offered by Mr. G's in New London, Conn., to the hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard Employees who work in the area. Located a short distance from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, the restaurant and bar is a popular spot for academy cadets, staff and others. Manager Peter Farnan says he's beginning to see signs of the shutdown, estimating his business has dropped about 10 percent. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
United States Department of Agriculture employee Lori Lodato, of Wilmington, Mass., display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Internal Revenue Service employees Brian Lanouette, of Merrimack, N.H., center right, and Mary Maldonado, of Dracut, Mass., right, join with others as they display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse, in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Internal Revenue Service employees, front row from the left, Brian Lanouette, of Merrimack, N.H., Mary Maldonado, of Dracut, Mass., and Maria Zangari, of Haverhill, Mass., display placards during a rally by federal employees and supporters, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, in front of the Statehouse, in Boston, held to call for an end of the partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Ga., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the "Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act" bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. Susie Lee, D-Nev., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the "Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act" bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. Susan Wild, D-Pa., left, accompanied by Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., center, and Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., right, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the "Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act" bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., joined by House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., center, and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., left, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, following weekly Whip meeting. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., discusses the government shutdown during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
U.S. Coast Guardsmen and women, who missed their first paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, stand on a 45-foot response boat as they listen to their lieutenant during their shift at Sector Puget Sound base Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. They are part of a multi-mission, around-the-clock group charged with security and search and rescue missions. The Coast Guard is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which is unfunded during the partial government shutdown. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A man heading into the Sacramento International Airport passes demonstrators calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end the shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. More than two dozen federal employees and supporters called for an end to the partial government shutdown now in its fourth week. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Several dozen federal employees and supporters demonstrated at the Sacramento International Airport calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end then partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Doors at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in the Henry M. Jackson Federal Building are locked and covered with blinds as a sign posted advises that the office will be closed during the partial government shutdown Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. The shutdown is in its fourth week with no end in sight. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Airport operation workers wearing fluorescent safety jackets flipped burgers and hot dogs on a grill set up on a tarmac in front of a plane at Salt Lake City International Airport, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Salt Lake City. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
A tourist is reflected in a window of the closed building housing the Liberty Bell, in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019. The building is closed due to the partial government shutdown. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., left, Rep. Tom Malinowski, D-N.J., Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., and other freshmen members of the House of Representatives walk to the Senate side to speak about the government shutdown on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
The White House is seen as snow continues to fall, Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Park service workers clean the snow outside of Lincoln Memorial, during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president's Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
People play with snow at the National Mall during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president's Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
The U.S. Capitol is see behind the Peace Monument during a snowstorm, as a partial government shutdown stretches into its third week at Capitol Hill in Washington Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. With the standoff over paying for his long-promised border wall dragging on, the president's Oval Office address and visit to the Texas border over the past week failed to break the logjam and left aides and allies fearful that the president has misjudged Democratic resolve and is running out of negotiating options. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
An electronic billboard, sponsored by the Democratic Coalition,  shown Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019 in Nicholasville, Ky.  McConnell, who is up for re-election in 2020 in a state where Trump tends to be more popular than he is, sees no other choice than to stand back and let the president who took the country into the shutdown decide how he wants to get out of it. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
An image of a boy is painted on the bars of the border wall, in front of coils of razor wire Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, seen from Tijuana, Mexico. The partial government shutdown was on track Friday to become the longest closure in U.S. history as President Donald Trump and nervous Republicans looked for a way out of the mess. A solution couldn't come soon enough for federal workers who got pay statements Friday but no pay. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
A boy plays as floodlights from the United States filter through the border wall Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, in Tijuana, Mexico. The partial U.S. government shutdown was on track Friday to become the longest closure in U.S. history as President Donald Trump and nervous Republicans look for a way out of the mess. A solution couldn't come soon enough for federal workers who got pay statements Friday but no pay. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
President Donald Trump attends a roundtable discussion on border security with local leaders, Friday Jan. 11, 2019, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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