Today in History: Dec. 3

President Andrew Jackson, the 7th president on the U.S. is shown in an undated portarait.  (AP Photo)
In 1828, Andrew Jackson was elected president of the United States by the Electoral College. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
First lady Michelle Obama speaks after receiving an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humanities from Oberlin College, Monday, May 25, 2015, in Oberlin, Ohio. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
In 1833, Oberlin College in Ohio – the first truly coeducational school of higher learning in the United States – began holding classes. Here, first lady Michelle Obama speaks after receiving an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humanities from Oberlin College, Monday, May 25, 2015, in Oberlin, Ohio. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak) (AP/Tony Dejak)
1926:  English crime writer Agatha Christie (1890 - 1976) and her daughter, Rosalind, (right), are featured in a newspaper article reporting the mysterious disappearance of the novelist.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
In 1926, a real-life mystery began as English novelist Agatha Christie, 36, drove away from her home in Sunningdale, Berkshire, and disappeared. (Christie turned up 11 days later at a hotel in Harrogate, Yorkshire, under an assumed name, for reasons never quite explained.) 1926: English crime writer Agatha Christie (1890 – 1976) and her daughter, Rosalind, (right), are featured in a newspaper article reporting the mysterious disappearance of the novelist. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Hulton Archive)
The final scene of the original Broadway production of Tennessee Williams' play " A Streetcar Named Desire," is shown on December 17, 1947, in New York City. The cast includes Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski, Kim Hunter as Stella, and Jessica Tandy as Blanche. (AP Photo)
In 1947, the Tennessee Williams play “A Streetcar Named Desire” opened on Broadway. The final scene of the original Broadway production of the play is shown on December 17, 1947, in New York City. The cast includes Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski, Kim Hunter as Stella, and Jessica Tandy as Blanche. (AP Photo) (AP)
Heart transplant surgeon Dr. Christiaan Barnard is shown after performing the first heart transplant on patient Louis Washkansky on December 3, 1967 in Cape Town, South Africa.  Barnard headed a medical team that removed the heart of a 24-year-old woman who died in an auto accident and replaced the diseased heart of the dying 55-year-old businessman Washkansky. (AP Photo)
In 1967, surgeons in Cape Town, South Africa led by Dr. Christiaan Barnard performed the first human heart transplant on Louis Washkansky, who lived 18 days with the new heart. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
A security guard and an unidentified man look at an area where several people were killed as they were caught in a surging crowd entering Cincinnati's Riverfront Coliseum for a Who concert on Monday. Shoes and clothes were strewn around the area where the people were killed and injured, shown Dec. 4, 1979. (AP Photo/Brian Horton)
In 1979, 11 people were killed in a crush of fans at Cincinnati’s Riverfront Coliseum, where the British rock group The Who was performing. Here, on Dec. 4, 1979, a security guard and an unidentified man look at an area where shoes and clothes were strewn. (AP Photo/Brian Horton) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Brian Horton)
FILE – In this Dec. 5, 1984 file photo, two men carry to a hospital children blinded by the Union Carbide chemical pesticide leak in Bhopal, India. Indians are marking the 30th anniversary of the Bhopal gas leak tragedy with protests demanding harsher punishments for those responsible and more compensation for the victims of the world's worst industrial disaster. On Dec. 3, 1984, the pesticide plant leaked about 40 tons of deadly methyl isocyanate gas into the air, killing an estimated 15,000 people and affecting at least 500,000 more. Michigan-based Dow Chemical Co. took over Union Carbide in 2001. (AP Photo/Sondeep Shankar, File)
On Dec. 3, 1984, thousands of people died after a cloud of methyl isocyanate gas escaped from a pesticide plant operated by a Union Carbide subsidiary in Bhopal, India. In this Dec. 5, 1984 file photo, two men carry to a hospital children blinded by the Union Carbide chemical pesticide leak in Bhopal, India. Indians are marking the 30th anniversary of the Bhopal gas leak tragedy with protests demanding harsher punishments for those responsible and more compensation for the victims of the world’s worst industrial disaster. On Dec. 3, 1984, the pesticide plant leaked about 40 tons of deadly methyl isocyanate gas into the air, killing an estimated 15,000 people and affecting at least 500,000 more. Michigan-based Dow Chemical Co. took over Union Carbide in 2001. (AP Photo/Sondeep Shankar, File) (AP/Sondeep Shankar)
Three former U.S. hostages, from left, Joseph Cicippio, AP chief Middle East correspondent Terry Anderson, and Alann Steen enjoy a light moment shortly after Anderson's arrival at the Wiesbaden Air Force hospital early Thursday, Dec. 5, 1991.  (AP Photo/Kurt Strumpf)
In 1991, radicals in Lebanon released American hostage Alann (cq) Steen, who’d been held captive nearly five years. Three former U.S. hostages, from left, Joseph Cicippio, AP chief Middle East correspondent Terry Anderson, and Alann Steen enjoy a light moment shortly after Anderson’s arrival at the Wiesbaden Air Force hospital early Thursday, Dec. 5, 1991. (AP Photo/Kurt Strumpf) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/KURT STRUMPF)
Tori Murden, of Louisville, Ky., attempting to become the first American and first woman to row solo across the North Atlantic Ocean, waves her hat as she hits open water Sunday, June 14, 1998, off North Carolina's Outer Banks, near Nags Head, N.C. Murden hopes to row 3, 635 miles as the crow flies and make the French coast in mid-September. (AP Photo/Bob Jordan)
In 1999, Tori Murden of the United States became the first woman to row across the Atlantic Ocean alone as she arrived at the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, 81 days after leaving the Canary Islands near the coast of Africa. Tori Murden, of Louisville, Ky., attempting to become the first American and first woman to row solo across the North Atlantic Ocean, waves her hat as she hits open water Sunday, June 14, 1998, off North Carolina’s Outer Banks, near Nags Head, N.C. Murden hopes to row 3, 635 miles as the crow flies and make the French coast in mid-September. (AP Photo/Bob Jordan) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/BOB JORDAN)
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President Andrew Jackson, the 7th president on the U.S. is shown in an undated portarait.  (AP Photo)
First lady Michelle Obama speaks after receiving an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humanities from Oberlin College, Monday, May 25, 2015, in Oberlin, Ohio. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
1926:  English crime writer Agatha Christie (1890 - 1976) and her daughter, Rosalind, (right), are featured in a newspaper article reporting the mysterious disappearance of the novelist.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
The final scene of the original Broadway production of Tennessee Williams' play " A Streetcar Named Desire," is shown on December 17, 1947, in New York City. The cast includes Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski, Kim Hunter as Stella, and Jessica Tandy as Blanche. (AP Photo)
Heart transplant surgeon Dr. Christiaan Barnard is shown after performing the first heart transplant on patient Louis Washkansky on December 3, 1967 in Cape Town, South Africa.  Barnard headed a medical team that removed the heart of a 24-year-old woman who died in an auto accident and replaced the diseased heart of the dying 55-year-old businessman Washkansky. (AP Photo)
A security guard and an unidentified man look at an area where several people were killed as they were caught in a surging crowd entering Cincinnati's Riverfront Coliseum for a Who concert on Monday. Shoes and clothes were strewn around the area where the people were killed and injured, shown Dec. 4, 1979. (AP Photo/Brian Horton)
FILE – In this Dec. 5, 1984 file photo, two men carry to a hospital children blinded by the Union Carbide chemical pesticide leak in Bhopal, India. Indians are marking the 30th anniversary of the Bhopal gas leak tragedy with protests demanding harsher punishments for those responsible and more compensation for the victims of the world's worst industrial disaster. On Dec. 3, 1984, the pesticide plant leaked about 40 tons of deadly methyl isocyanate gas into the air, killing an estimated 15,000 people and affecting at least 500,000 more. Michigan-based Dow Chemical Co. took over Union Carbide in 2001. (AP Photo/Sondeep Shankar, File)
Three former U.S. hostages, from left, Joseph Cicippio, AP chief Middle East correspondent Terry Anderson, and Alann Steen enjoy a light moment shortly after Anderson's arrival at the Wiesbaden Air Force hospital early Thursday, Dec. 5, 1991.  (AP Photo/Kurt Strumpf)
Tori Murden, of Louisville, Ky., attempting to become the first American and first woman to row solo across the North Atlantic Ocean, waves her hat as she hits open water Sunday, June 14, 1998, off North Carolina's Outer Banks, near Nags Head, N.C. Murden hopes to row 3, 635 miles as the crow flies and make the French coast in mid-September. (AP Photo/Bob Jordan)

Today is Monday, Dec. 3, the 337th day of 2018. There are 28 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlights in History:

On Dec. 3, 1984, thousands of people died after a cloud of methyl isocyanate gas escaped from a pesticide plant operated by a Union Carbide subsidiary in Bhopal, India.

On this date:

In 1818, Illinois was admitted as the 21st state.

In 1828, Andrew Jackson was elected president of the United States by the Electoral College.

In 1833, Oberlin College in Ohio — the first truly coeducational school of higher learning in the United States — began holding classes.

In 1926, English mystery writer Agatha Christie, 36, disappeared after driving away from her home in Sunningdale, Berkshire. (Christie turned up 11 days later at a hotel in Harrogate, Yorkshire.)

In 1947, the Tennessee Williams play “A Streetcar Named Desire” opened on Broadway.

In 1964, police arrested some 800 students at the University of California at Berkeley, one day after the students stormed the administration building and staged a massive sit-in.

In 1967, a surgical team in Cape Town, South Africa, led by Dr. Christiaan Barnard (BAHR’-nard) performed the first human heart transplant on Louis Washkansky, who lived 18 days with the donor organ, which came from Denise Darvall, a 25-year-old bank clerk who had died in a traffic accident.

In 1979, 11 people were killed in a crush of fans at Cincinnati’s Riverfront Coliseum, where the British rock group The Who was performing.

In 1980, Bernadine Dohrn, a former leader of the radical Weather Underground, surrendered to authorities in Chicago after more than a decade as a fugitive.

In 1991, radicals in Lebanon released American hostage Alann (cq) Steen, who’d been held captive nearly five years.

In 1992, the first telephone text message was sent by British engineer Neil Papworth, who transmitted the greeting “Merry Christmas” from his work computer in Newbury, Berkshire, to Vodafone executive Richard Jarvis’ mobile phone. The Greek tanker Aegean Sea spilled more than 21 million gallons of crude oil when it ran aground off northwestern Spain.

In 1999, Tori Murden of the United States became the first woman to row across the Atlantic Ocean alone as she arrived at the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, 81 days after leaving the Canary Islands near the coast of Africa.

Ten years ago: President-elect Barack Obama selected New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson as his commerce secretary. (However, Richardson withdrew a month later when it appeared his confirmation hearings would be complicated by a grand jury investigation over how state contracts were issued to political donors; Gary Locke ended up being appointed.) Theological conservatives upset by liberal views of U.S. Episcopalians and Canadian Anglicans formed a rival North American province.

Five years ago: Seeking to regroup from his health care law’s disastrous rollout, President Barack Obama insisted the sweeping overhaul was working and warned Republican critics that he would fight any efforts to strip away its protections. A federal judge ruled Detroit could use bankruptcy to cut employee pensions and relieve itself of other crushing debts, handing a defeat to the city’s unions and retirees and shifting the case into a delicate new phase. The Illinois Legislature approved a historic plan to eliminate the state’s $100 billion pension shortfall.

One year ago: The second-largest U.S. drugstore chain, CVS, announced that it was buying Aetna, the third-largest health insurer, in order to push much deeper into customer care. Former longtime Illinois congressman John Anderson, who ran for president as an independent in 1980, died in Washington at the age of 95. A partial implosion of the Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan, failed to bring down the upper section of the Detroit Lions’ former home; the demolition company handling the project was successful the following day.

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