Today in History: Oct. 7

Knox College displays its banner supporting presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln as he speaks before a crowd during his fifth debate with Sen. Stephen A. Douglas in Galesburg, Ill., on Oct. 7, 1858.   Artist Victor Perard drew this sketch of Old Main, the central building on the Knox College campus.  (AP Photo)
In 1858, the fifth debate between Illinois senatorial candidates Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place in Galesburg. Here, Knox College displays its banner supporting presidential candidate Lincoln as he speaks during the debate. Artist Victor Perard drew this sketch of Old Main, the central building on the Knox College campus. (AP Photo) (AP)
Singer Marian Anderson holds a Korean doll in her New York apartment, Aug. 5, 1958. The doll and the shawl she is wearing are gifts received on a trip to the Far East. Miss Anderson became a member of the United States delegation to the United Nations, which she sees as an opportunity to contribute to the mutual understandings of people. (AP Photo)
In 1954, Marian Anderson became the first black singer hired by the Metropolitan Opera Company in New York. Here, Anderson holds a Korean doll in her New York apartment, Aug. 5, 1958. (AP Photo) (AP)
Television debates were an innovation in the 1960 U.S. Presidential campaign. Sen. John F. Kennedy and Vice-President Richard M. Nixon as they appeared in the fourth and final of these debates in New York City, Dec. 8, 1960. (AP Photo)
In 1960, Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy and Republican opponent Richard Nixon held their second televised debate. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Pope John Paul II at mass on the Mall in Washington on Oct. 7, 1979. (AP Photo)
In 1979, Pope John Paul II concluded his week-long tour of the United States with a Mass on the Washington Mall. (AP Photo) (AP)
Recent undated  picture of cruise ship Achille Lauro reportedly  jacked on Monday, Oct. 7, 1985 in the Mediterranean off the Egyptian coast group of Palestinians. (AP Photo)
In 1985, Palestinian gunmen hijacked the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro in the Mediterranean. The hijackers killed Leon Klinghoffer, a Jewish-American tourist, before surrendering on Oct. 9. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
FILE - This Oct. 11, 1991 file photo shows University of Oklahoma Law Professor Anita Hill testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. HBO says that “Scandal” star Kerry Washington will play Hill in a film about the 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Clarence Thomas. (AP Photo, File)
In 1991, University of Oklahoma law professor Anita Hill publicly accused Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of making sexually inappropriate comments when she worked for him; Thomas denied Hill’s allegations. FILE – This Oct. 11, 1991 file photo shows University of Oklahoma Law Professor Anita Hill testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. HBO says that “Scandal” star Kerry Washington will play Hill in a film about the 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Clarence Thomas. (AP Photo, File) (AP/Anonymous)
Andrew Lloyd Webber,  Trevor Nunn, Gillian Lynne
In 1982, the Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice musical “Cats” opened on Broadway.  (The show ended its original run on Sept. 10, 2000, after a then-record 7,485 performances.) FILE – In this July 7, 2014 file photo, British composer Andrew Lloyd Webber, center, director Trevor Nunn, left, and choreographer Gillian Lynne, center right, pose for photographers with performers in cat costumes, during a photo-op to promote the return of the musical Cats, in central London. “Cats,” once Broadway’s longest-running show, will not be a “Memory” for long – the musical is coming back to New York. The Andrew Lloyd Webber musical will return this summer to the Neil Simon Theatre under its original director, Nunn. Previews begin July 14, 2016 and opening night is Aug. 2 (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File) (AP)
Matthew Shepard
In 1998, Matthew Shepard, a gay college student, was beaten and left tied to a wooden fencepost outside of Laramie, Wyoming; he died five days later. (Russell Henderson and Aaron McKinney are serving life sentences for Shepard’s murder.) This undated photo provided by the Matthew Shepard Foundation shows Matthew Shepard, a gay University of Wyoming student who was murdered to death in Laramie, Wyo., in 1998. His death became a rallying point in the gay rights movement. The Laramie City Council is scheduled to hold its final vote Wednesday, May 13, 2015, on a measure that would prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in housing, employment and access to public facilities such as restaurants. (Matthew Shepard Foundation via AP) (AP)
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Knox College displays its banner supporting presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln as he speaks before a crowd during his fifth debate with Sen. Stephen A. Douglas in Galesburg, Ill., on Oct. 7, 1858.   Artist Victor Perard drew this sketch of Old Main, the central building on the Knox College campus.  (AP Photo)
Singer Marian Anderson holds a Korean doll in her New York apartment, Aug. 5, 1958. The doll and the shawl she is wearing are gifts received on a trip to the Far East. Miss Anderson became a member of the United States delegation to the United Nations, which she sees as an opportunity to contribute to the mutual understandings of people. (AP Photo)
Television debates were an innovation in the 1960 U.S. Presidential campaign. Sen. John F. Kennedy and Vice-President Richard M. Nixon as they appeared in the fourth and final of these debates in New York City, Dec. 8, 1960. (AP Photo)
Pope John Paul II at mass on the Mall in Washington on Oct. 7, 1979. (AP Photo)
Recent undated  picture of cruise ship Achille Lauro reportedly  jacked on Monday, Oct. 7, 1985 in the Mediterranean off the Egyptian coast group of Palestinians. (AP Photo)
FILE - This Oct. 11, 1991 file photo shows University of Oklahoma Law Professor Anita Hill testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. HBO says that “Scandal” star Kerry Washington will play Hill in a film about the 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Clarence Thomas. (AP Photo, File)
Andrew Lloyd Webber,  Trevor Nunn, Gillian Lynne
Matthew Shepard

Today is Sunday, Oct. 7, the 280th day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 7, 1991, University of Oklahoma law professor Anita Hill publicly accused Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of making sexually inappropriate comments when she worked for him; Thomas denied Hill’s allegations.

On this date:

In 1777, the second Battle of Saratoga began during the American Revolution. (British forces under General John Burgoyne surrendered ten days later.)

In 1858, the fifth debate between Illinois senatorial candidates Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place in Galesburg.

In 1916, in the most lopsided victory in college football history, Georgia Tech defeated Cumberland University 222-0 in Atlanta.

In 1949, the Republic of East Germany was formed.

In 1954, Marian Anderson became the first black singer hired by the Metropolitan Opera Company in New York.

In 1960, Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy and Republican opponent Richard Nixon held their second televised debate, this one in Washington, D.C.

In 1979, Pope John Paul II concluded his week-long tour of the United States with a Mass on the Washington Mall.

In 1982, the Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice musical “Cats” opened on Broadway. (The show ended its original run on Sept. 10, 2000, after a then-record 7,485 performances.)

In 1985, Palestinian gunmen hijacked the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro (ah-KEE’-leh LOW’-roh) in the Mediterranean. (The hijackers killed Leon Klinghoffer, a Jewish-American tourist, before surrendering on Oct. 9.)

In 1989, Hungary’s Communist Party renounced Marxism in favor of democratic socialism during a party congress in Budapest.

In 1992, trade representatives of the United States, Canada and Mexico initialed the North American Free Trade Agreement during a ceremony in San Antonio, Texas, in the presence of President George H.W. Bush, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney (muhl-ROO’-nee) and Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.

In 1998, Matthew Shepard, a gay college student, was beaten and left tied to a wooden fencepost outside of Laramie, Wyoming; he died five days later. (Russell Henderson and Aaron McKinney are serving life sentences for Shepard’s murder.)

Ten years ago: The misery worsened on Wall Street, as the Dow lost more than 500 points and all the major indexes slid more than 5 percent. In their second presidential debate, held at Belmont University in Nashville, Democrat Barack Obama and Republican John McCain clashed repeatedly over the causes and cures for the economic crisis. Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa of Japan and Yoichiro Nambu of the United States won the Nobel Prize in physics.

Five years ago: A partial federal government shutdown lingered, rattling markets in the U.S. and overseas while a gridlocked Congress betrayed little or no urgency toward resolving the impasse. Americans James Rothman and Randy Schekman and German-born researcher Thomas Suedhof won the Nobel Prize in medicine for discoveries on how proteins and other materials are transported within cells.

One year ago: Country music star Jason Aldean, who had been on stage at an outdoor concert in Las Vegas less than a week earlier when a gunman opened fire on the crowd, paid tribute to the victims and to the late Tom Petty by opening “Saturday Night Live” with Petty’s song, “I Won’t Back Down.” Protesters rallied across Russia in a challenge to President Vladimir Putin on his 65th birthday; heeding calls from opposition leader Alexei Navalny to pressure authorities into letting him enter the presidential race.

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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