Today in History: Oct. 19

1781:  Lord Charles Cornwallis and the British surrendering to General Washington at York Town (Yorktown) Virginia. The surrender effectively ended the American War of Independence.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
In 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Virginia, as the American Revolution neared its end. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Hulton Archive)
A British Airways supersonic Concorde airliner takes off from London's Heathrow Airport at 10:29 gmt, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 1977 on its inaugural scheduled passenger flight to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport. The aircraft filled with 100 passengers, set a record crossing of 3 hours 23 minutes. (AP Photo)
In 1977, the supersonic Concorde made its first landing in New York City. Here, a British Airways supersonic Concorde airliner takes off from London’s Heathrow Airport on Nov. 22, 1977 on its inaugural scheduled passenger flight to New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport. (AP Photo) (AP)
Trader Ryan Falvey works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. What if the stock market plunged 20 percent tomorrow? The question may seem absurd when the market is in the midst of one of its calmest runs in history and at record highs. But it's what investors had to deal with 30 years ago, when "Black Monday" blasted stocks on Oct. 19, 1987. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
On Oct. 19, 1987, the stock market crashed as the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 508 points, or 22.6 percent in value (its biggest daily percentage loss), to close at 1,738.74 in what came to be known as “Black Monday.” Trader Ryan Falvey works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. What if the stock market plunged 20 percent tomorrow? The question may seem absurd when the market is in the midst of one of its calmest runs in history and at record highs. But it’s what investors had to deal with 30 years ago, when “Black Monday” blasted stocks on Oct. 19, 1987. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) (AP/Richard Drew)
41YQzIgNqqL.jpg
In 1953, the Ray Bradbury novel “Fahrenheit 451,” set in a dystopian future where books are banned and burned by the government, was first published by Ballantine Books. (Amazon)
John DeLorean
In 1982, automaker John Z. DeLorean was arrested by federal agents in Los Angeles, accused of conspiring to sell $24 million of cocaine to salvage his business. FILE – This December 1987 file photo shows automaker John DeLorean. A federal court in New Jersey dismissed a lawsuit brought by Sally DeLorean, the widow of automaker John DeLorean, over royalties stemming from the “Back to the Future” movies. (AP Photos/File) (AP)
**FILE**  Former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein reacts in court while listening to the prosecution, during the Anfal genocide trial in Baghdad, Iraq, in this Dec. 21, 2006 file photo.  Some Arab media are reporting, Saturday morning, Dec. 30, 2006, that Saddam Hussein has been executed. The Associated Press is seeking confirmation. (AP Photo / Nikola Solic, pool, file)
In 2005, a defiant Saddam Hussein pleaded innocent to charges of premeditated murder and torture as his trial opened under heavy security in the former headquarters of his Baath Party in Baghdad. **FILE** Former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein reacts in court while listening to the prosecution, during the Anfal genocide trial in Baghdad, Iraq, in this Dec. 21, 2006 file photo. Some Arab media are reporting, Saturday morning, Dec. 30, 2006, that Saddam Hussein has been executed. The Associated Press is seeking confirmation. (AP Photo / Nikola Solic, pool, file) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/NIKOLA SOLIC)
Colin Powell
In 2008, retired Gen. Colin Powell, a Republican who was President George W. Bush’s first secretary of state, broke with the party and endorsed Democrat Barack Obama for president, calling him a “transformational figure” during an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” In this photo taken Nov. 9, 2011, Former Secretary of State Colin Powell speaks in New York. In a leaked 2015 email exchange, former Secretary of State Colin Powell discussed Israel’s nuclear weapons with a friend, saying the country has 200 warheads. (AP Photo/Eric Reichbaum) (AP)
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1781:  Lord Charles Cornwallis and the British surrendering to General Washington at York Town (Yorktown) Virginia. The surrender effectively ended the American War of Independence.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
A British Airways supersonic Concorde airliner takes off from London's Heathrow Airport at 10:29 gmt, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 1977 on its inaugural scheduled passenger flight to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport. The aircraft filled with 100 passengers, set a record crossing of 3 hours 23 minutes. (AP Photo)
Trader Ryan Falvey works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. What if the stock market plunged 20 percent tomorrow? The question may seem absurd when the market is in the midst of one of its calmest runs in history and at record highs. But it's what investors had to deal with 30 years ago, when "Black Monday" blasted stocks on Oct. 19, 1987. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
41YQzIgNqqL.jpg
John DeLorean
**FILE**  Former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein reacts in court while listening to the prosecution, during the Anfal genocide trial in Baghdad, Iraq, in this Dec. 21, 2006 file photo.  Some Arab media are reporting, Saturday morning, Dec. 30, 2006, that Saddam Hussein has been executed. The Associated Press is seeking confirmation. (AP Photo / Nikola Solic, pool, file)
Colin Powell

Today is Friday, Oct. 19, the 292nd day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 19, 1789, John Jay was sworn in as the first Chief Justice of the United States.

On this date:

In 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Virginia, as the American Revolution neared its end.

In 1864, Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early’s soldiers attacked Union forces at Cedar Creek, Virginia; the Union troops were able to rally and defeat the Confederates.

In 1944, the U.S. Navy began accepting black women into WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service).

In 1950, during the Korean Conflict, United Nations forces entered the North Korean capital of Pyongyang.

In 1953, the Ray Bradbury novel “Fahrenheit 451,” set in a dystopian future where books are banned and burned by the government, was first published by Ballantine Books.

In 1967, the U.S. space probe Mariner 5 flew past Venus.

In 1977, the supersonic Concorde made its first landing in New York City.

In 1982, automaker John Z. DeLorean was arrested by federal agents in Los Angeles, accused of conspiring to sell $24 million of cocaine to salvage his business. (DeLorean was acquitted at trial on grounds of entrapment.)

In 1987, the stock market crashed as the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 508 points, or 22.6 percent in value (its biggest daily percentage loss), to close at 1,738.74 in what came to be known as “Black Monday.”

In 1994, 22 people were killed as a terrorist bomb shattered a bus in the heart of Tel Aviv’s shopping district.

In 2001, U.S. special forces began operations on the ground in Afghanistan, opening a significant new phase of the assault against the Taliban and al-Qaida.

In 2005, a defiant Saddam Hussein pleaded innocent to charges of premeditated murder and torture as his trial opened under heavy security in the former headquarters of his Baath Party in Baghdad.

Ten years ago: Retired Gen. Colin Powell, a Republican who was President George W. Bush’s first secretary of state, broke with the party and endorsed Democrat Barack Obama for president, calling him a “transformational figure” during an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” The Tampa Bay Rays held off the defending champion Boston Red Sox 3-1 to win the American League championship series in Game 7. Mr. Blackwell, the acerbic designer famous for his annual worst-dressed list of celebrities, died in Los Angeles at age 86.

Five years ago: Nine Lebanese pilgrims abducted in Syria and two Turkish pilots held hostage in Lebanon returned home as part of an ambitious three-way deal cutting across the Syrian civil war. Shane Victorino’s seventh-inning grand slam propelled Boston to a 5-2 victory over the Detroit Tigers, clinching the AL championship series in six games. British actor and musician Noel Harrison, who sang the Academy Award-winning ballad “The Windmills of Your Mind,” died in Devon, England, at age 79.

One year ago: Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello, meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House about a month after Hurricane Maria, described the situation in the island territory as “catastrophic”; Trump rated the White House response to the disaster as a “10.” Counter-demonstrators greatly outnumbered supporters of white nationalist Richard Spencer, drowning him out as he spoke at the University of Florida. The Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Chicago Cubs 11- 1 to reach the World Series for the first time in almost three decades.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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