Thousands of runners take part in Army Ten-Miler

The first of 35,000 runners gather near the starting line for the start of the Army 10 Miler. (WTOP/John Domen)
The first of 35,000 runners gather near the starting line for the start of the Army Ten-Miler. (WTOP/John Domen) (WTOP/John Domen)
Blackhawk helicopters fly overhead along Route 110 during the Army 10 Miler. (WTOP/John Domen)
Blackhawk helicopters fly overhead along Route 110 during the Army Ten-Miler. (WTOP/John Domen) (WTOP/John Domen)
The starting line of the race shortly before the 8 a.m. starter's gun. (WTOP/John Domen)
The starting line of the race shortly before the 8 a.m. starter’s gun. (WTOP/John Domen) (WTOP/John Domen)
The start of the Army 10 Miler in a slight drizzle. (WTOP/John Domen)
The start of the Army Ten-Miler in a slight drizzle. (WTOP/John Domen) (WTOP/John Domen)
The finish line at the Army 10 Miler. (WTOP/John Domen)
The finish line at the Army Ten-Miler. (WTOP/John Domen) (WTOP/John Domen)
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The first of 35,000 runners gather near the starting line for the start of the Army 10 Miler. (WTOP/John Domen)
Blackhawk helicopters fly overhead along Route 110 during the Army 10 Miler. (WTOP/John Domen)
The starting line of the race shortly before the 8 a.m. starter's gun. (WTOP/John Domen)
The start of the Army 10 Miler in a slight drizzle. (WTOP/John Domen)
The finish line at the Army 10 Miler. (WTOP/John Domen)

WASHINGTON — It’s an annual tradition for 35,000 people in the capital region — and while weather conditions weren’t ideal, it wasn’t bad either as the Army Ten-Miler ran from the Pentagon, through D.C., and back again Sunday morning.

Runners came from every state and even other countries to run.

At exactly 8 a.m., as a few rain drops fell, the starter’s pistol fired, the cannon thundered, and the first of several waves of runners took off north along Route 110.

Inside those throngs of people were runners of all caliber, from the serious competitors to those who just wanted to enjoy a trip around the nation’s monuments.

This year’s winner was Haran Lagat, who finished the race in well under an hour.

He made clear he was in it to win it, using the word “serious” several times. After jumping out to an early lead, he says he slowed things down a bit during the fourth mile before running away with things.

“At the fifth mile I just took off,” said Lagat, who said the humidity wasn’t so bad but was admittedly bothered by the sprinkling of rain that occasionally fell. “The ground was a little bit wet and slippery, and our clothes were so wet … that affected me more than the humidity.”

The winning female runner was Susan Tanui, who also finished the race in under an hour.

The winner of the Wounded Warrior division was a Maryland man named Scot Seiss of Rocky Ridge, in Frederick County.

“I enjoy competing,” Seiss said. “This is the only time I get to see a lot of these guys,” he added, pointing to a group of other competitors in their racing hand cycles.

“Every race is kind of a mini-reunion and we all enjoy the competition.”

Major Kelly Calway, a teacher at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and also a marathon coach there, lamented the high humidity.

“It’s like a thousand percent today,” she joked but she relished being a part of the race once again.

“The monuments are so inspiring,” Calway said. “It’s beautiful. I look forward to coming here every year. I’m moving down here next year. This is going to be my home turf next year! It’s absolutely stunning.”


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