10 haunted Halloween happenings in the DC area

One of the Carver family members is seen here with her teddy bear at Shocktober. (Courtesy Shannon Finney, www.shannonfinneyphotography.com)
Shocktober
Leesburg, Virginia
The name says it all: Visitors to this year’s event will be shocked at the spooky transformation of Paxton Campus’ Paxton Manor. The Loudoun County haunted house tells the legend of the Carver family, who were banished from Leesburg and forced to move to the caverns below the mansion. Fast forward 100 years and the Carvers are sick of living underground, so they’re taking back the 32-room manor. Tickets to Shocktober are $35 online and $40 at the ticket office; the house is open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays in October. All proceeds benefit Paxton Campus, a nonprofit that serves children and adults with disabilities. (Courtesy Shannon Finney Photography) (Courtesy Shannon Finney, www.shannonfinneyphotography.com)
The grave of J. Edgar Hoover, the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), is seen at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Soul Strolls at Congressional Cemetery
Washington, D.C.  Congressional Cemetery in Capitol Hill is the final resting place for more than 65,000 individuals. And on select evenings in October, you can explore their stories during the cemetery’s hour-long nighttime tour. Tours will not stay on the path, so flashlights, shoes — and some courage — are required. Adult tickets are $22; children 12 and under are $12. Beer, wine and cider will be available for purchase. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) (AP/Charles Dharapak)
The Clifton Haunted Trail
Clifton, Virginia It’s that time again: time for another terrifying year in Clifton, Virginia. On Oct. 28, you will find nearly the entire town of Clifton in the woods at the edge of town, anxiously awaiting their first victims — err, visitors. The Clifton Haunted Trail has been a town tradition since 2001, and has since grown to a half-mile production that includes hundreds of volunteers. Adults are $15; those 12 and under are $10. All proceeds benefit the Town of Clifton. Read more about The Clifton Haunted Trail on wtop.com. (Courtesy Clifton Haunted Trail, Witschey Photography) (Witschey Photography)
Haunted Hollow
Warrenton, Virginia
Sarah Leonard’s great-grandparents bought an abandoned farm in Warrenton, Virginia nearly 100 years ago, and every since then, visitors have remarked on how creepy the farm is — both during the day and at night. The family decided to work with what they have, so they turned the farm and its barns into a haunted trail. More than 60 actors and several scenes bring this land to life — or death. Haunted Hollow is open Oct. 14, Oct 20, Oct. 21, Oct. 27 and Oct. 28. Tickets are $18 at the door. (Courtesy Haunted Hollow)
Cox Farms Field of Fear
Centreville, Virginia
During the day, Cox Farms attracts hundreds of D.C.-area families to Centreville, Virginia, with its pumpkin patch, farm animals and hayrides. Come nightfall, it attracts only the brave. Visitors can still walk the corn maze and go on a hayride — only, the atmosphere is much spookier. Cox Farms’ Fields of Fear is open weekends in October. Tickets range from $15 to $25. (Courtesy Cox Farms/Jason Hornick)   (Jason Hornick)
Boo at the Zoo
Washington, D.C.  Scares aren’t just for the big kids. Little ones can get a thrill — albeit toned down— at the annual Boo at the Zoo at the National Zoo. More than 40 treat stations are set up throughout the zoo, and decorated trails are not to be missed. The event runs Oct. 20 to 22. Tickets range from $20 to $30. (Courtesy Smithsonian’s National Zoo Flickr) (National Zoo Flickr )
Markoff’s Haunted Forest
Dickerson, Maryland  If you’re not scared of the woods, then you’ve never been to Markoff’s. The haunted forest in Montgomery County, Maryland, has a number of scares and scenes that will have you screaming. Proceeds from ticket sales benefit Calleva, an outdoor school. (Courtesy Markoff’s Haunted Forest) (Courtesy Markoff's )
381329 06: A group of girls laugh together as they try navigate through a 10 acre cornfield maze October 19, 2000 in La Union, NM. The local farmer who built the maze is one of many using tourism as a way to supplement their income. The maze was designed using a GPS system to mark out the trail. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Newsmakers)
Night Maze at The Corn Maze
The Plains, Virginia  By day, the Corn Maze at The Plains is the epitome of the perfect fall activity. By night, it’s a scarier scenario to navigate. Night Maze is less terrifying than haunted houses in the area, but there’s still a fear-factor for those who seek a less obvious scare. Admission is $11. Make sure you bring a flashlight. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Newsmakers) (Getty Images/Joe Raedle)
Alexandria, Cemetery, Colonial Tours Michael J. LaPierre
Alexandria’s Ghost & Graveyard Tour
Alexandria, Virginia  Experience ghost stories, legends and folklore in historic Old Town, Alexandria. Public tours are $13 for adults. (Courtesy Alexandria Colonial Tours/Michael J. LaPierre) (Michael J. LaPierre)
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One of the Carver family members is seen here with her teddy bear at Shocktober. (Courtesy Shannon Finney, www.shannonfinneyphotography.com)
The grave of J. Edgar Hoover, the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), is seen at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
381329 06: A group of girls laugh together as they try navigate through a 10 acre cornfield maze October 19, 2000 in La Union, NM. The local farmer who built the maze is one of many using tourism as a way to supplement their income. The maze was designed using a GPS system to mark out the trail. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Newsmakers)
Alexandria, Cemetery, Colonial Tours Michael J. LaPierre

WASHINGTON — Halloween isn’t all tricks and treats in the D.C. area — there’s plenty of scare to go around, too.

Here are a number of haunted happenings taking place this season. Scroll through the gallery if you dare.

[Related: Haunted history: 10 spooky places in DC]

[Related: 18 can’t-miss fall festivals in DC area]

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