Animals rescued from Louisiana flood headed to Waldorf

Last Chance animal rescue's Cindy Sharpley said that disasters like the one in the Bayou state highlight the need to microchip your furry friend.
Last Chance Animal Rescue drove to Chattanooga, Tennessee, Tuesday to meet the Louisiana Humane Society and take possession of dogs, cats, puppies and kittens rescued from the Baton Rouge area.
Last Chance Animal Rescue drove to Chattanooga, Tennessee, Tuesday to meet the Louisiana Humane Society and take possession of dogs, cats, puppies and kittens rescued from the Baton Rouge area.
Adoption events are scheduled in Virginia and Maryland in September for the rescued animals. .
The cats will be made available for adoption quickly, but the dogs will take more time.
Last Chance Animal Rescue drove to Tennessee to meet with the Louisiana Humane Society to rescue pets from the flooded state.
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WASHINGTON — Some 50 animals saved from flooded shelters in Louisiana or given up by flood victims will soon be put up for adoption in the D.C. region.

“We partner with the Louisiana Humane Society, and they have taken over a couple of the shelters in the Livingston Parish,” said Cindy Sharpley with Last Chance Animal Rescue in Waldorf, Maryland.

“They’re underwater, so they’re going to have their hands full,” Sharpley said. “So what we’re doing is taking the animals that they know that can leave, and get them into a safe area.”

Sharpley drove to Chattanooga, Tennessee, Tuesday to meet with workers from the Louisiana Humane Society and take possession of dogs, cats, puppies and kittens rescued from the Baton Rouge area.

But the Louisianans did not leave empty-handed.

The Maryland nonprofit gave them much-needed flood cleanup and mold prevention supplies, including bleach, mops and buckets.

Last Chance Animal Rescue will give the animals veterinary care, vaccinations and spay and neuter them, if needed.

The cats will be made available for adoption quickly, but the dogs will take more time.

Two adoption events are planned for next month.

“One on Sept. 10 at the Alexandria Petco, and one on Sept. 17 at the PetSmart in Columbia, Maryland. And you can get updates on this on our Facebook page,” Sharpley said.

Removing these animals from Baton Rouge area shelters allows those facilities to clean up and take in pets that need to be reunited with their owners.

Sharpley said disasters such as the one in Louisiana highlight the need to microchip your furry friend.

“They should have a set of tags, but absolutely a microchip. It’s the sure fire way of getting your animal back if something happens,” she said.

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