Government shutdown: Which states are hit hardest?


WASHINGTON — In perhaps non-shocking news, it turns out that D.C. is being affected the most by the current government shutdown. The runners-up, however, might be surprising.

The federal government has shut down 21 times since 1976. Three of those shutdowns have been under President Donald Trump’s administration, though the first lasted only a couple of days and the second a few hours.

The longest (so far) started in 1995 because of a clash between then-President Bill Clinton and Congress over a spending bill Clinton vetoed because it didn’t align with his objectives for education, the environment, Medicare and public health.

It lasted 27 days in total and Republicans — Newt Gingrich in particular, due to his “temper tantrum” — famously bore the brunt of the blame.

House speaker Newt Gingrich gestures as he speaks to a news conference prior to a breakfast meeting with Rep. Tom Bliley, R-Va., right, in Richmond, Va., Monday, Dec. 18, 1995.  Gingrich blamed president Clinton for the budget deadlock that caused a partial shutdown of the federal government.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
House speaker Newt Gingrich gestures as he speaks to a news conference prior to a breakfast meeting with Rep. Tom Bliley, R-Va., right, in Richmond, Va., Monday, Dec. 18, 1995. Gingrich blamed President Clinton for the budget deadlock that caused a partial shutdown of the federal government. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

FILE – In this Jan. 3, 1995, file photo federal workers demonstrate against the partial federal government shutdown outside the State Department in Washington.  President Barack Obama and his officials are doing their best to drum up public concern over the shock wave of spending cuts that could strike the government in just days. So it’s a good time to be alert for sky-is-falling hype. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook, File)
In this Jan. 3, 1995, file photo federal workers demonstrate against the partial federal government shutdown outside the State Department in Washington. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook, File)

Federal workers hold a demonstration outside the State Department in Washington Wednesday Jan. 3, 1995 to protest the partial federal government shutdown. House Republican leaders dismissed a Senate plan that would send idled federal workers back to work. President Clinton and Republican leaders have scheduled another White House bargaining session Wednesday in their search for a budget-balancing pact. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook)
Federal workers hold a demonstration outside the State Department in Washington Wednesday, Jan. 3, 1995 to protest the partial federal government shutdown. House Republican leaders dismissed a Senate plan that would send idled federal workers back to work. President Clinton and Republican leaders have scheduled another White House bargaining session Wednesday in their search for a budget-balancing pact. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook)

FILE - In this Dec. 31, 1995, file photo, President Bill Clinton meets with House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Ga., left, and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas,  to grapple with competing balanced budget plans. OK, gridlocked politicians we're used to. But why padlock the Statue of Liberty? You don't see other democracies shuttering landmarks and sending civil servants home just because their political parties can't get along. The potential for a shutdown is a quirk of American history. So if you're tired of blaming tea party Republicans or President Barack Obama, you can lay some responsibility on the Founding Fathers. Or blame Jimmy Carter. Or Newt Gingrich's temper tantrum. A quick history of government shutdowns, American-style.  (AP Photo/Greg Gibson, File)
In this Dec. 31, 1995, file photo, President Bill Clinton meets with House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Ga., left, and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas, to grapple with competing balanced budget plans. OK, gridlocked politicians we’re used to. But why padlock the Statue of Liberty? You don’t see other democracies shuttering landmarks and sending civil servants home just because their political parties can’t get along. The potential for a shutdown is a quirk of American history. So you can lay some responsibility on the Founding Fathers. Or blame Jimmy Carter. Or Newt Gingrich. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson, File)

President Clinton meets with Republican congressional leaders at the White House Friday Dec. 29, 1995 to discuss the federal budget impasse. From left to right are Treasury Secreatry Robert Rubin, House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Clinton and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
President Clinton meets with Republican congressional leaders at the White House Friday, Dec. 29, 1995, to discuss the federal budget impasse. From left to right are Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin, House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Clinton and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Employees of the Department of Health and Human Services leave their building in Washington Monday Dec. 18, 1995 after being told to go home as part of the partial federal shutdown. With no progress in balanced budget talks, President Clinton vetoed two spending bills Monday and prepared to reject a third. Congressional Republicans, meanwhile, held out little hope for a temporary bill to reopen the government. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson)
Employees of the Department of Health and Human Services leave their building in Washington Monday, Dec. 18, 1995, after being told to go home as part of the partial federal shutdown. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson)

President Clinton shakes hands with Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas and Vice President Gore shakes hands with House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia during their Oval Office meeting Tuesday Dec. 19, 1995 to discuss the federal budget impasse. Budget talks collapsed Wednesday after President Clinton scuttled an Oval office meeting with Republican leaders and accused "the most extreme" House Republicans of reneging on a deal that could have ended the government's partial shutdown. (AP Photo/White House)
President Clinton shakes hands with Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas and Vice President Gore shakes hands with House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia during their Oval Office meeting Tuesday, Dec. 19, 1995, to discuss the federal budget impasse. Budget talks collapsed the next day after President Clinton scuttled an Oval Office meeting with Republican leaders and accused “the most extreme” House Republicans of reneging on a deal that could have ended the government’s partial shutdown. (AP Photo/White House)

White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta walks through the Capitol amid reporters Thursday Dec. 21, 1995 after budget talks broke up for the day. Bipartisan budget talks sprang back to life Thursday, but Democrats threatened to cut them off again if Republicans don't swiftly send President Clinton a bill ending the six-day government shutdown.(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta walks through the Capitol amid reporters Thursday, Dec. 21, 1995, after budget talks broke up for the day. Bipartisan budget talks sprang back to life that day, but Democrats threatened to cut them off again if Republicans didn’t swiftly send President Clinton a bill ending the government shutdown, which had by then lasted six days. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas ponders a reporters question as he walks on Capitol Hill Thursday Dec. 21, 1995. The White House and Congressional Republicans labored Thursday to restart balanced budget talks and grappled with the impact of a six-day partial government shutdown. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin)
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas ponders a reporters question as he walks on Capitol Hill Thursday, Dec. 21, 1995.  (AP Photo/Denis Paquin)

Dave Glass, of Baltimore, a federal government computer assistant, right, and about 100 other furloughed Social Security Administration workers gather at the Arthur J. Altmeyer Building Tuesday, Dec. 26, 1995 in Woodlawn, Md., to protest the temporary government shutdown. (AP Photo/Gary Sussman)
Dave Glass, of Baltimore, a federal government computer assistant, right, and about 100 other furloughed Social Security Administration workers gather at the Arthur J. Altmeyer Building Tuesday, Dec. 26, 1995, in Woodlawn, Md., to protest the government shutdown. (AP Photo/Gary Sussman)

President Clinton speaks to a group of Democratic leaders gathered at Blair House across from the White House Saturday, Dec. 16, 1995 to discuss the federal budget. At the head table with Clinton are, from left, House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt of Missouri, Vice President Al Gore and Senate Minority Leader Thomas Daschle of South Dakota. Parts of the federal government were ordered shut down today as President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
President Clinton speaks to a group of Democratic leaders gathered at Blair House across from the White House Saturday, Dec. 16, 1995 to discuss the federal budget. At the head table with Clinton are, from left, House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt of Missouri, Vice President Al Gore and Senate Minority Leader Thomas Daschle of South Dakota. President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A sign hangs in the window of an information booth Saturday Dec. 16, 1995 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington announcing the temporary closure of the attraction due to the government shutdown.  Parts of the federal government were ordered shut down Saturday as President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor.(AP Photo/Mark Wilson)
A sign hangs in the window of an information booth Saturday Dec. 16, 1995 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington announcing the temporary closure of the attraction due to the government shutdown. Parts of the federal government were ordered shut down Saturday as President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor.(AP Photo/Mark Wilson)

Tourists watch as National Park Service employee Ann Marie DeSerafino locks the entrance to the Liberty Bell Pavilion in Independence National Historic Park in Philadelphia Saturday, December 16, 1995. Independence Mall was closed Saturday afternoon after the White House ordered another partial federal shutdown. (AP Photo/Mpozi Mshale Tolbert)
Tourists watch as National Park Service employee Ann Marie DeSerafino locks the entrance to the Liberty Bell Pavilion in Independence National Historic Park in Philadelphia Saturday, December 16, 1995. Independence Mall was closed that afternoon. (AP Photo/Mpozi Mshale Tolbert)

Tourists look at the national Christmas tree from behind locked gates Saturday Dec. 16, 1995 in Washington after the display was closed due to a federal budget shutdown. Parts of the federal government were ordered shut down today as President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor.  (AP Photo/Mark Wilson)
Tourists look at the national Christmas tree from behind locked gates Saturday Dec. 16, 1995, in Washington after the display was closed due to a federal budget shutdown. (AP Photo/Mark Wilson)

FILE - In this Dec. 21, 1995, file photo Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, dumps out coal, his so-called Christmas gift to President Clinton, during a news conference on the federal budget on Capitol Hill. The White House and Congressional Republicans tried to restart balanced budget talks after the sixth day of a partial government shutdown. Then, as now in 2011, a Democratic president clashed over spending priorities with a recently installed Republican House majority. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin, File)
In this Dec. 21, 1995, file photo Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, dumps out coal, his so-called Christmas gift to President Clinton, during a news conference on the federal budget on Capitol Hill. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin, File)

(1/15)
House speaker Newt Gingrich gestures as he speaks to a news conference prior to a breakfast meeting with Rep. Tom Bliley, R-Va., right, in Richmond, Va., Monday, Dec. 18, 1995.  Gingrich blamed president Clinton for the budget deadlock that caused a partial shutdown of the federal government.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
FILE – In this Jan. 3, 1995, file photo federal workers demonstrate against the partial federal government shutdown outside the State Department in Washington.  President Barack Obama and his officials are doing their best to drum up public concern over the shock wave of spending cuts that could strike the government in just days. So it’s a good time to be alert for sky-is-falling hype. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook, File)
Federal workers hold a demonstration outside the State Department in Washington Wednesday Jan. 3, 1995 to protest the partial federal government shutdown. House Republican leaders dismissed a Senate plan that would send idled federal workers back to work. President Clinton and Republican leaders have scheduled another White House bargaining session Wednesday in their search for a budget-balancing pact. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook)
FILE - In this Dec. 31, 1995, file photo, President Bill Clinton meets with House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Ga., left, and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas,  to grapple with competing balanced budget plans. OK, gridlocked politicians we're used to. But why padlock the Statue of Liberty? You don't see other democracies shuttering landmarks and sending civil servants home just because their political parties can't get along. The potential for a shutdown is a quirk of American history. So if you're tired of blaming tea party Republicans or President Barack Obama, you can lay some responsibility on the Founding Fathers. Or blame Jimmy Carter. Or Newt Gingrich's temper tantrum. A quick history of government shutdowns, American-style.  (AP Photo/Greg Gibson, File)
President Clinton meets with Republican congressional leaders at the White House Friday Dec. 29, 1995 to discuss the federal budget impasse. From left to right are Treasury Secreatry Robert Rubin, House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Clinton and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
Employees of the Department of Health and Human Services leave their building in Washington Monday Dec. 18, 1995 after being told to go home as part of the partial federal shutdown. With no progress in balanced budget talks, President Clinton vetoed two spending bills Monday and prepared to reject a third. Congressional Republicans, meanwhile, held out little hope for a temporary bill to reopen the government. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson)
President Clinton shakes hands with Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas and Vice President Gore shakes hands with House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia during their Oval Office meeting Tuesday Dec. 19, 1995 to discuss the federal budget impasse. Budget talks collapsed Wednesday after President Clinton scuttled an Oval office meeting with Republican leaders and accused "the most extreme" House Republicans of reneging on a deal that could have ended the government's partial shutdown. (AP Photo/White House)
White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta walks through the Capitol amid reporters Thursday Dec. 21, 1995 after budget talks broke up for the day. Bipartisan budget talks sprang back to life Thursday, but Democrats threatened to cut them off again if Republicans don't swiftly send President Clinton a bill ending the six-day government shutdown.(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas ponders a reporters question as he walks on Capitol Hill Thursday Dec. 21, 1995. The White House and Congressional Republicans labored Thursday to restart balanced budget talks and grappled with the impact of a six-day partial government shutdown. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin)
Dave Glass, of Baltimore, a federal government computer assistant, right, and about 100 other furloughed Social Security Administration workers gather at the Arthur J. Altmeyer Building Tuesday, Dec. 26, 1995 in Woodlawn, Md., to protest the temporary government shutdown. (AP Photo/Gary Sussman)
President Clinton speaks to a group of Democratic leaders gathered at Blair House across from the White House Saturday, Dec. 16, 1995 to discuss the federal budget. At the head table with Clinton are, from left, House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt of Missouri, Vice President Al Gore and Senate Minority Leader Thomas Daschle of South Dakota. Parts of the federal government were ordered shut down today as President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
A sign hangs in the window of an information booth Saturday Dec. 16, 1995 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington announcing the temporary closure of the attraction due to the government shutdown.  Parts of the federal government were ordered shut down Saturday as President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor.(AP Photo/Mark Wilson)
Tourists watch as National Park Service employee Ann Marie DeSerafino locks the entrance to the Liberty Bell Pavilion in Independence National Historic Park in Philadelphia Saturday, December 16, 1995. Independence Mall was closed Saturday afternoon after the White House ordered another partial federal shutdown. (AP Photo/Mpozi Mshale Tolbert)
Tourists look at the national Christmas tree from behind locked gates Saturday Dec. 16, 1995 in Washington after the display was closed due to a federal budget shutdown. Parts of the federal government were ordered shut down today as President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor.  (AP Photo/Mark Wilson)
FILE - In this Dec. 21, 1995, file photo Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, dumps out coal, his so-called Christmas gift to President Clinton, during a news conference on the federal budget on Capitol Hill. The White House and Congressional Republicans tried to restart balanced budget talks after the sixth day of a partial government shutdown. Then, as now in 2011, a Democratic president clashed over spending priorities with a recently installed Republican House majority. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin, File)

The 2018-2019 shutdown, entering its 13th day Thursday, also revolves around government spending. This time, it’s ostensibly centered on funding for Trump’s signature campaign pledge to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Businesses in Washington have been eerily quiet since the shutdown started. And most federally funded locations in D.C. are closed. But the impact of the shutdown is being felt far beyond the borders of the District.

According to a WalletHub report, New Mexico is the second-most impacted by the shutdown, right after D.C., due to the share of federal jobs to federal contract dollars per capita and the share of families receiving food stamps.

Third is Maryland. Fourth is Hawaii. Alaska is fifth, with Virginia coming in sixth.

At the very bottom of the list, hit the least, is Minnesota.

“To measure the relative impact of the January 2019 partial government shutdown on each state, as well as the District of Columbia, WalletHub identified five basic metrics that speak to how people across the country will be affected by the absence of government services,” the report reads.

WalletHub says it “analyzed publicly available data from official sources to score the shutdown’s impact by state” to reach its conclusions.

“Each metric was scored on a 100-point scale, with 100 representing the biggest impact from the government shutdown. We then determined each state and the District’s weighted average across all metrics to calculate its overall score and used the resulting scores to construct our final ranking.”

That rubric is based on the share of federal jobs, federal contract dollars per capita, the percentage of families receiving food stamps, each area’s real estate as a percentage of the gross state product and access to national parks.

See an interactive map with the full results below.

Source: WalletHub
Courtesy WalletHub

The current government shutdown began Dec. 22 after Trump bowed to conservative demands that he fight to make good on his vow and secure funding for the wall before Republicans lost control of the House on. He said repeatedly during his presidential campaign that Mexico would pay for such a wall.

Democrats have remained committed to blocking the president’s priority, and with neither side engaging in substantive negotiation, the effect of the partial shutdown was set to spread and to extend into the new year.

In August 2015, during the campaign, Trump made his expectations for the border explicitly clear, as he parried criticism from rival Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor.

“Jeb Bush just talked about my border proposal to build a ‘fence,’” he tweeted. “It’s not a fence, Jeb, it’s a WALL, and there’s a BIG difference!”

Trump suggested as much again in a tweet on Sunday: “President and Mrs. Obama built/has a ten foot Wall around their D.C. mansion/compound. I agree, totally necessary for their safety and security. The U.S. needs the same thing, slightly larger version!”

There is no such wall around the Obamas’ D.C. house.

Aside from what constitutes a wall, neither side appeared ready to budge off its negotiating position. The two sides have had little direct contact during the stalemate, and Trump did not ask Republicans, who hold a monopoly on power in Washington until Thursday, to keep Congress in session.

Talks have been at a stalemate for more than a week, after Democrats said the White House offered to accept $2.5 billion for border security. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer told Vice President Mike Pence that it wasn’t acceptable, nor was it guaranteed that Trump, under intense pressure from his conservative base to fulfill his signature campaign promise, would settle for that amount.

Conway claimed Sunday that “the president has already compromised” by dropping his request for the wall from $25 billion, and she called on Democrats to return to the negotiating table.

“It is with them,” she said, explaining why Trump was not reaching out to Democrats.

Democrats maintain that they have already presented the White House with three options to end the shutdown, none of which fund the wall, and insist that it’s Trump’s move.

“At this point, it’s clear the White House doesn’t know what they want when it comes to border security,” said Justin Goodman, Schumer’s spokesman. “While one White House official says they’re willing to compromise, another says the president is holding firm at no less than $5 billion for the wall. Meanwhile, the president tweets blaming everyone but himself for a shutdown he called for more than 25 times.”

After canceling a vacation to his private Florida club, Trump spent the weekend at the White House. He has remained out of the public eye since returning early Thursday from a 29-hour trip to visit U.S. troops in Iraq, instead taking to Twitter to attack Democrats. He also moved to defend himself from criticism that he couldn’t deliver on the wall while the GOP controlled both the House and Senate.

“For those that naively ask why didn’t the Republicans get approval to build the Wall over the last year, it is because IN THE SENATE WE NEED 10 DEMOCRAT VOTES, and they will gives us “NONE” for Border Security!,” he tweeted. “Now we have to do it the hard way, with a Shutdown.”

Democrats have vowed to pass legislation restoring the government as soon as they take control of the House on Thursday, but that won’t accomplish anything unless Trump and the Republican-controlled Senate go along with it.

The shutdown has forced hundreds of thousands of federal workers and contractors to stay home or work without pay.

WalletHub used data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, usaspending.gov, the National Association of Realtors and National Park Service.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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