Kimberley Diamond on display at Smithsonian’s Museum of Natural History

The 55.08-carat Kimberley diamond comes from a crystal found in the Kimberley mining region of South Africa around 1940. (Courtesy Smithsonian Institution)
The 55.08-carat Kimberley diamond comes from a crystal found in the Kimberley mining region of South Africa around 1940. (Courtesy Smithsonian Institution) (Courtesy Smithsonian Institution)
The 55.08-carat Kimberley diamond comes from a crystal found in the Kimberley mining region of South Africa around 1940. (Courtesy Smithsonian Institution)
The 55.08-carat Kimberley diamond comes from a crystal found in the Kimberley mining region of South Africa around 1940. (Courtesy Smithsonian Institution) (Courtesy Smithsonian Institution)
(1/2)
The 55.08-carat Kimberley diamond comes from a crystal found in the Kimberley mining region of South Africa around 1940. (Courtesy Smithsonian Institution)
The 55.08-carat Kimberley diamond comes from a crystal found in the Kimberley mining region of South Africa around 1940. (Courtesy Smithsonian Institution)

Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History has acquired the Kimberley Diamond for its National Gem Collection.

The 55.08-carat diamond will go on display in the Hall of Geology Gems and Minerals, close to the Hope Diamond.

“The Kimberley Diamond is one of the world’s great gemstones, a true icon and superb example of a fancy yellow diamond,” Dr. Jeff Post, curator of the National Gem Collection, said.

The diamond comes from a 490-carat crystal found in the Kimberley mining region of South Africa around 1940.

“From the 1940s to 1960s, the Kimberley Diamond was one of the most recognizable gemstones in the world, exhibited throughout the country, celebrated in books, magazines and newspapers and featured on the TV shows “It Takes a Thief” and “Ironside,” according to a news release from Smithsonian.

The diamond was sold to a private buyer in 1971 and then acquired by philanthropist Bruce Stuart in 2002.

“We offer our sincere appreciation to Bruce Stuart for his generosity in making this historic gift to the Nation. It will enrich the National Collection for generations to come,” added Post.

It will debut at the museum on Friday.

Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others.

© 2019 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up