Peace Walk aims to keep King’s dream alive

On a freezing January day, community members gathered in Southeast to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (WTOP/Kristi King)
On a freezing January day, community members gathered in Southeast to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (WTOP/Kristi King) (WTOP/Kristi King)
Dereka Coleman and Simona Coleman wave flags for Community College Preparatory Academy at the MLK Peace Walk in D.C. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Dereka Coleman and Simona Coleman wave flags for Community College Preparatory Academy at the MLK Peace Walk in D.C. (WTOP/Kristi King) (WTOP/Kristi King)
Shalita Cunningham, of D.C. with daughters Chardonnay, Daeja, Jasmine and Allyse, at the MLK Peace Walk. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Shalita Cunningham, of D.C. with daughters Chardonnay, Daeja, Jasmine and Allyse, at the MLK Peace Walk. (WTOP/Kristi King) (WTOP/Kristi King)
Barry Vettis is picking up trash during the MLK Peace Walk "to help D.C. look beautiful." (WTOP/Kristi King)
Barry Vettis is picking up trash during the MLK Peace Walk “to help D.C. look beautiful.” (WTOP/Kristi King) (WTOP/Kristi King)
Kamau Grimes and Kristina Jacabs of the National Black United Front. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Kamau Grimes and Kristina Jacabs of the National Black United Front. (WTOP/Kristi King) (WTOP/Kristi King)
At the MLK Peace Walk, Leah Brown says closing down public housing is a form of ethnic cleansing. (WTOP/Kristi King) (WTOP/Kristi King)
Bishop and Pastor of Greater Grace Family Ministries Church on Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, Doctor Edward Barnett believes the entire nation can come together as one community though peace. "It's going to take peace, it's going to take love, it's going to take equality and freedom,"  Barnett said.  (WTOP/Kristi King)
Bishop and Pastor of Greater Grace Family Ministries Church on Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, Doctor Edward Barnett believes the entire nation can come together as one community though peace. “It’s going to take peace, it’s going to take love, it’s going to take equality and freedom,” Barnett said. (WTOP/Kristi King) (WTOP/Kristi King)
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On a freezing January day, community members gathered in Southeast to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Dereka Coleman and Simona Coleman wave flags for Community College Preparatory Academy at the MLK Peace Walk in D.C. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Shalita Cunningham, of D.C. with daughters Chardonnay, Daeja, Jasmine and Allyse, at the MLK Peace Walk. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Barry Vettis is picking up trash during the MLK Peace Walk "to help D.C. look beautiful." (WTOP/Kristi King)
Kamau Grimes and Kristina Jacabs of the National Black United Front. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Bishop and Pastor of Greater Grace Family Ministries Church on Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, Doctor Edward Barnett believes the entire nation can come together as one community though peace. "It's going to take peace, it's going to take love, it's going to take equality and freedom,"  Barnett said.  (WTOP/Kristi King)

WASHINGTON — Hundreds of people gathered in the bitter cold on Monday to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a Peace Walk in Southeast Washington.

“If you look out here, you see people from all walks of life, and it’s really making me feel good,” said Haywood Donerson of the MLK Parade and Peace Walk. “Dr. King would feel good today.”

Clergy members led the walk down Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue.

“We still remember Dr. King, we remember the dream and we want it to stay alive,” said Dr. Edward Barnett, Bishop and Pastor of Greater Grace Family Ministries Church.

“We want the whole of Washington, D.C. to become one community and the whole country to become a community,” Barnett said solemnly. “And we can do it with — peace.”

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