Record rainfall, strong winds roll through DC region

<p>An intense thunderstorm moves across the Potomac River near National Harbor on Monday, April 13, 2020. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)</p>
An intense thunderstorm moves across the Potomac River near National Harbor on Monday, April 13, 2020. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)

<p>A swirling thunderstorm churns over southern Fairfax County, Virginia, around 12:45 p.m. on Monday, April 13. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)</p>
A swirling thunderstorm is seen churning over southern Fairfax County, Virginia, around 12:45 p.m. on Monday, April 13. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)

Storm damage to a tree in Montgomery County, Maryland.

A tree is downed by the strong storms that hit the area Monday.

A tree loses a limb in the aftermath of the strong winds and storms that hit the region Monday.

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<p>An intense thunderstorm moves across the Potomac River near National Harbor on Monday, April 13, 2020. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)</p>
<p>A swirling thunderstorm churns over southern Fairfax County, Virginia, around 12:45 p.m. on Monday, April 13. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)</p>

Severe weather pounded much of the D.C. region on Monday, producing record rainfall at all three area airports.

The National Weather Service tweeted that the rainfall at Dulles International Airport measured at 1.79 inches, breaking the record of 0.93 inches on this date in 1972. At BWI Marshall Airport, the 1.97 inches broke the old record of 1.46 inches, also from 1972.

Reagan National Airport saw the most rain of the three airports, measuring at 2.33 inches, more than doubling the previous record of 1.16 inches on this day in 1961.

The day started with a tornado watch and wind advisory that lasted well into the afternoon.

Bands of heavy rain caused localized flooding on some area roadways, along with wind gusts of up to 70 mph.


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The high winds associated with a powerful frontal boundary moving across the East Coast led to hundreds of power outages in the region.

Though the threat of severe weather has passed, temperatures are expected to start to dip. According to Storm Team 4’s Amelia Draper, skies will be clear with temperatures falling into the 40s heading into the overnight hours.

Lower St. Mary’s County, Maryland, saw some wind damage from early morning storms. Wires and trees were downed in Redgate, and Naval Air Station Patuxent River observed a thunderstorm wind gust of 62 mph just after 9:30 a.m.

Montgomery County, Maryland, also saw storm damage, particularly with downed trees.

In Fairfax County, Virginia, water levels were creeping upward on streams around Wolf Trap, Great Falls and Annandale, leading to closures on Hunter Mill Road and Lawyers Road. Accotink and Wolftrap creeks are at or above flood stage, as is Difficult Run.



Forecast

Tuesday: A mix of clouds and sunshine. Breezy and much cooler. Highs in the upper 50s to low 60s.

Wednesday: Cloudy, chilly and raw. Periods of rain and possible wet snow in the morning. Highs in the low to mid 50s.

Thursday: Mostly sunny, brisk and cool. Highs in the mid to upper 50s.


Current conditions

Power outages

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