What you need to know about the upcoming solar eclipse

WASHINGTON — Happy first day of summer! It officially started for the D.C. region Wednesday morning at 12:24 a.m. EDT. 

Coincidentally, Wednesday also marks 60 days to the solar eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017 that will cross the United States from the West Coast to the East Coast — an event that hasn’t happened in 99 years.

In preparation for the solar eclipse, which may be the most watched in history, NASA and other federal agencies participated in a joint news conference at the Newseum. Representatives from NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Park Service and Federal Highway Administration provided valuable information on the eclipse, weather, logistics and safety.

FILE - In this 1953 file photo, trees lie strewn across the Siberian countryside 45 years after a meteorite struck the Earth near Tunguska, Russia. The 1908 explosion is generally estimated to have been about 10 megatons; it leveled some 80 million trees for miles near the impact site. The meteor that streaked across the Russian sky Friday, Feb. 15, 2013, is estimated to be about 10 tons. It exploded with the power of an atomic bomb over the Ural Mountains, about 5,000 kilometers (3,000 miles) west of Tunguska. (AP Photo, File)
In this 1953 file photo, trees lie strewn across the Siberian countryside 45 years after a meteorite struck the Earth near Tunguska, Russia. The 1908 explosion leveled some 80 million trees for miles near the impact site. The meteor that streaked across the Russian sky Friday, Feb. 15, 2013, is estimated to be about 10 tons. It exploded with the power of an atomic bomb over the Ural Mountains, about 5,000 kilometers (3,000 miles) west of Tunguska. (AP Photo, File) (AP)
On Halloween Night 2015, Spooky flew 330,000 miles past Earth -- so close and so fast you could see it in a backyard telescope. (WTOP/Greg Redfern)
On Halloween Night 2015, Spooky flew 330,000 miles past Earth — so close and so fast you could see it in a backyard telescope. (WTOP/Greg Redfern) (WTOP/Greg Redfern)
A slice of the Chelyabinsk Asteroid space rock. (Courtesy PolandMET Asteroids)
A slice of the Chelyabinsk Asteroid space rock. (Courtesy PolandMET Asteroids) (Courtesy PolandMET Asteroids)
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FILE - In this 1953 file photo, trees lie strewn across the Siberian countryside 45 years after a meteorite struck the Earth near Tunguska, Russia. The 1908 explosion is generally estimated to have been about 10 megatons; it leveled some 80 million trees for miles near the impact site. The meteor that streaked across the Russian sky Friday, Feb. 15, 2013, is estimated to be about 10 tons. It exploded with the power of an atomic bomb over the Ural Mountains, about 5,000 kilometers (3,000 miles) west of Tunguska. (AP Photo, File)
On Halloween Night 2015, Spooky flew 330,000 miles past Earth -- so close and so fast you could see it in a backyard telescope. (WTOP/Greg Redfern)
A slice of the Chelyabinsk Asteroid space rock. (Courtesy PolandMET Asteroids)

Follow my daily blog to keep up with the latest news in astronomy and space exploration. You can email me at skyguyinva@gmail.com.

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