Accused serial rapist from New Carrollton has previous, related convictions

The New Carrollton, Maryland, man accused of drugging and raping teens while posing as a Howard University student has a nearly two decades-long history of preying on women, according to court testimony Friday.

NBC Washington reports the revelations are from a bond hearing where it was determined Julian Everett, 35, would stay jailed.

Prince George’s County State’s Attorney Aisha Braveboy told the court Everett has been a sexual predator since 2001. When he was 17, Everett was convicted of kidnapping a woman with an accomplice in D.C., intending to rape her but beating the victim instead after learning she was transgender.

In 2005, Everett was convicted of sexually assaulting a 16-year-old in Virginia.

Everett’s defense attorney unsuccessfully argued that Everett had no serious criminal history and should be released under conditions of GPS monitoring, according to NBC Washington.

Everett was arrested on March 21 and currently faces charges in Prince George’s County, Maryland for three sexual assaults of teenagers that happened in 2016, 2015 and 2005.

Everett owns a barber shop near Howard University. In the two most recent incidents, police allege Everett lured his victims by posing as a Howard student. In all the cases, Everett is accused of incapacitating his victims by giving them drugged drinks.

The 17- and 18-year-old Howard University students reporting assaults in 2016 and 2015 claim Everett drugged them while out on dates and took them back to his New Carrollton home where he raped them.

State’s Attorney Aisha Braveboy tells NBC Washington that since Everett’s arrest, more victims have come forward and their claims are being investigated.

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