Capturing today’s East Coast music scene through a lens

'4 x 6 East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013' goes backstage and into the lives of local musicians.
Jessica Flynn/Courtesy Govinda Gallery. © 4″ x 6″ East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013
Emily Assiran/Courtesy Govinda Gallery. © 4″ x 6″ East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013
Jessica Flynn/Courtesy Govinda Gallery. © 4″ x 6″ East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013.
Vivienne Foster/Courtesy Govinda Gallery. © 4″ x 6″ East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013.
Neo Cons Chris Suspect/Courtesy Govinda Gallery. © 4″ x 6″ East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013.
Jordan Swartz/Courtesy Govinda Gallery. © 4″ x 6″ East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013.
Clarissa Villondo/Courtesy Govinda Gallery. © 4″ x 6″ East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013.
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WASHINGTON – Swinging mics, mid-song strums and tattooed arms. A new collection of photographs is doing more than documenting the area’s modern rock scene, it’s illustrating the fading relationship between musicians and photographers.

“4” x 6″ East Coast Rock & Roll Photography 2013″ is a pop-up exhibition at the new K Street music venue Gypsy Sally’s, organized by the Govinda Gallery and curated by local photographer Vivienne Foster.

The exhibit features photographs of East Coast rock-and-roll bands, through the lenses of six young photographers.

“Govinda Gallery is known for having shown the greatest music photographs, from Elvis right up through punk rock. But what this exhibit highlights are photographers who are shooting bands today,” says Chris Murray, director of Govinda Gallery.

But the exhibit goes beyond snapshots and portraits, it shows the audience what is often no longer available to photographers: access.

“Rarely do photographers get the kind of access that they did in the old days, when, for instance, Al Wertheimer could follow Elvis Presley or Astrid Kirchherr could be with the Beatles

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