Today in History: Oct. 16

This artwork is by an unknown artist depicting Marie Antoinette as she is taken to the guillotine at the height of the French Revolution October 16, 1793, for the crime of treason. (AP Photo)
In 1793, during the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette, the queen of France, was beheaded. This artwork is by an unknown artist depicting Marie Antoinette as she is taken to the guillotine. (AP Photo) (AP)
** ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, JUNE 13-14 ** FILE - This July 20, 2008 file photo offers a view looking down on Harpers Ferry, W.Va., at the conjunction of the Shanandoah, left, and the Potomac Rivers. The town was the site of abolitionist John Brown's infamous 1859 raid on the local arsenal, an event which led toward the Civil War. (AP/ Martin B. Cherry)
In 1859, radical abolitionist John Brown led a group of 21 men in a raid on Harpers Ferry in western Virginia. Ten of Brown’s men were killed and five escaped. Brown and six followers were captured; all were executed. (AP/ Martin B. Cherry) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Martin B. Cherry)
Margaret Sanger, advocate of birth control, is shown at New York's Waldorf Astoria hotel, May 10, 1961.   (AP Photo)
In 1916, Planned Parenthood had its beginnings as Margaret Sanger and her sister, Ethel Byrne, opened the first birth control clinic in Brooklyn, New York. (The clinic was raided nine days later by police who arrested Sanger, Byrne and Russian-born interpreter Fania Mindell.) Sanger is shown at New York’s Waldorf Astoria hotel, May 10, 1961. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
In this photo provided by the Department of Defense, low oblique angle air photo shows medium range ballistic missile base in Cuba, Oct. 24, 1962.  (AP Photo/Department of Defense)
On Oct. 16, 1962, the Cuban missile crisis began as President John F. Kennedy was informed that reconnaissance photographs had revealed the presence of missile bases in Cuba. In this photo provided by the Department of Defense, low oblique angle air photo shows medium range ballistic missile base in Cuba, Oct. 24, 1962. (AP Photo/Department of Defense) (AP/Anonymous)
Extending gloved hands skyward in racial protest, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City on Oct. 16, 1968. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left. (AP Photo)
In 1968, American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos sparked controversy at the Mexico City Olympics by giving “black power” salutes during a victory ceremony after they’d won gold and bronze medals in the 200-meter race. (AP Photo) (AP)
Eighteen-month old Jessica McClure is held by rescue worker Steven Forbes Friday night, Oct. 16, 1987 after she was trapped 22 feet under ground in an abandoned water well since Wednesday morning.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In 1987, a 58-1/2-hour drama in Midland, Texas, ended happily as rescuers freed Jessica McClure, an 18-month-old girl trapped in an abandoned well. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) (AP/ERIC GAY)
** FILE ** In this file photo from Oct. 16, 1995, the view from the Washington Monument toward the Capitol shows the participants in the Million Man March in Washington. Federal and local authorities are preparing for record numbers of people crowding into the National Mall and the parade route for the inauguration of President-elect Barack Obama. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
In 1995, a vast throng of black men gathered in Washington, D.C. for the “Million Man March” led by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Steve Helber)
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This artwork is by an unknown artist depicting Marie Antoinette as she is taken to the guillotine at the height of the French Revolution October 16, 1793, for the crime of treason. (AP Photo)
** ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, JUNE 13-14 ** FILE - This July 20, 2008 file photo offers a view looking down on Harpers Ferry, W.Va., at the conjunction of the Shanandoah, left, and the Potomac Rivers. The town was the site of abolitionist John Brown's infamous 1859 raid on the local arsenal, an event which led toward the Civil War. (AP/ Martin B. Cherry)
Margaret Sanger, advocate of birth control, is shown at New York's Waldorf Astoria hotel, May 10, 1961.   (AP Photo)
In this photo provided by the Department of Defense, low oblique angle air photo shows medium range ballistic missile base in Cuba, Oct. 24, 1962.  (AP Photo/Department of Defense)
Extending gloved hands skyward in racial protest, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City on Oct. 16, 1968. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left. (AP Photo)
Eighteen-month old Jessica McClure is held by rescue worker Steven Forbes Friday night, Oct. 16, 1987 after she was trapped 22 feet under ground in an abandoned water well since Wednesday morning.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
** FILE ** In this file photo from Oct. 16, 1995, the view from the Washington Monument toward the Capitol shows the participants in the Million Man March in Washington. Federal and local authorities are preparing for record numbers of people crowding into the National Mall and the parade route for the inauguration of President-elect Barack Obama. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Today is Wednesday, Oct. 16, the 289th day of 2019. There are 76 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 16, 1962, the Cuban missile crisis began as President John F. Kennedy was informed that reconnaissance photographs had revealed the presence of missile bases in Cuba.

On this date:

In 1793, during the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette, the queen of France, was beheaded.

In 1859, radical abolitionist John Brown led a group of 21 men in a raid on Harpers Ferry in western Virginia. (Ten of Brown’s men were killed and five escaped. Brown and six followers were captured; all were executed.)

In 1901, Booker T. Washington dined at the White House as the guest of President Theodore Roosevelt, whose invitation to the black educator sparked controversy.

In 1916, Planned Parenthood had its beginnings as Margaret Sanger and her sister, Ethel Byrne, opened the first birth control clinic in Brooklyn, New York. (The clinic ended up being raided by police and Sanger was arrested.)

In 1934, Chinese Communists, under siege by the Nationalists, began their “long march” lasting a year from southeastern to northwestern China.

In 1968, American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos sparked controversy at the Mexico City Olympics by giving “black power” salutes during a victory ceremony after they’d won gold and bronze medals in the 200-meter race.

In 1969, the New York Mets capped their miracle season by winning the World Series, defeating the Baltimore Orioles, 5-3, in Game 5 played at Shea Stadium.

In 1978, the College of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church chose Cardinal Karol Wojtyla (voy-TEE’-wah) to be the new pope; he took the name John Paul II.

In 1987, a 58-1/2-hour drama in Midland, Texas, ended happily as rescuers freed Jessica McClure, an 18-month-old girl trapped in a narrow, abandoned well.

In 1991, a deadly shooting rampage took place in Killeen, Texas, as a gunman opened fire at a Luby’s Cafeteria, killing 23 people before taking his own life.

In 1995, a vast throng of black men gathered in Washington, D.C. for the “Million Man March” led by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan.

In 2002, President George W. Bush signed a congressional resolution authorizing war against Iraq. The White House announced that North Korea had disclosed it had a nuclear weapons program.

Ten years ago: The government reported that the federal budget deficit for the just-ended fiscal year totaled an all-time high of $1.42 trillion (a record which still stands). Agricultural officials said pigs in Minnesota had tested positive for the H1N1 virus, or swine flu, the first such cases in the U.S.

Five years ago: During a special congressional hearing on the Ebola crisis, Republican lawmakers pressed for a ban on travel to the U.S. from the West African outbreak zone; the White House resisted the idea and tried to tamp down fear as the pool of Americans being monitored expanded. Travis Ishikawa hit the first homer to end an NL Championship Series, a three-run drive that sent San Francisco to a 6-3 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 5.

One year ago: A Turkish official said police searching the Saudi Consulate found evidence that Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi (jah-MAHL’ khahr-SHOHK’-jee) had been killed there. President Donald Trump, in an Associated Press interview, criticized the global condemnation of Saudi Arabia over the disappearance of Khashoggi, describing it as a rush to judgment like the one he said had been aimed at Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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