Today in History: Oct. 10

The academy will be the first naval base filmed by Google.  (WTOP/Andrew Mollenbeck)
In 1845, the U.S. Naval Academy was established in Annapolis, Maryland. Here, as Plebe Summer concludes, 1,178 plebes reunite with their families. (WTOP/Andrew Mollenbeck) (WTOP/Andrew Mollenbeck)
This is a general view looking north from barrier formed by slide dredges at work during construction in the Panama Canal Zone at Gaillard Cut, Culebra, Panama, on Oct. 30, 1915.  (AP Photo)
In 1913, the Panama Canal was effectively completed as President Woodrow Wilson sent a signal from the White House by telegraph, setting off explosives that destroyed a section of the Gamboa dike. This is a general view looking north from barrier formed by slide dredges at work during construction in the Panama Canal Zone at Gaillard Cut, Culebra, Panama, on Oct. 30, 1915. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek on August 3, 1943. Location unknown.  (AP Photo/Pool)
In 1943, Chiang Kai-shek took the oath of office as president of China. Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek on August 3, 1943. Location unknown. (AP Photo/Pool) (AP/Anonymous)
Japanese torchbearers of the Olympic flame relay team run through the rain on their way to the Olympic Stadium in October 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. The Olympic Flame is going to be lit by Yoshinori Sakai who was born in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, the day the nuclear weapon destroyed that city. He symbolizes the rebirth of Japan after the Second World War when he opens the Summer Olympic Games on October 10, 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo)
In 1964, the first Summer Olympics to be held in Asia were opened in Tokyo by Japanese Emperor Hirohito. Entertainer Eddie Cantor, 72, died in Beverly Hills, California. Japanese torchbearers of the Olympic flame relay team run through the rain on their way to the Olympic Stadium in October 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. The Olympic Flame was lit by Yoshinori Sakai who was born in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, the day the nuclear weapon destroyed that city. (AP Photo) (AP)
Sprio T. Agnew emerges from the federal court house in Baltimore Wednesday, Oct 10, 1973 after pleading no contest to a charge of federal tax evasion and resigning from the vice presidency. (AP Photo)
In 1973, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, accused of accepting bribes, pleaded no contest to one count of federal income tax evasion, and resigned his office. Spiro T. Agnew emerges from the federal court house in Baltimore Wednesday, Oct 10, 1973 after pleading no contest to a charge of federal tax evasion and resigning from the vice presidency. (AP Photo) (AP/WILLIAM SMITH)
In 1985,  actor Yul Brynner died in New York at age 65. Here, he takes curtain calls the night of Jan. 8,1985 after the opening performance of the farewell engagement of “The King and I” in New York City. Brynner starred in the role when the show opened 33 years earlier, and has played the role more than 4,300 times. (AP Photo/Rene Perez)
Residents look at the damage caused in a wall by a U.S. air strike in the village of Deh Sabz, 20 kilometers (13 miles) north of the Afghan capital Kabul Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2001. Warplanes pounded also  the Taliban's home base of Kandahar early Wednesday for the third time in 24 hours, targeting the airport outside the southern Afghan city (AP Photo/Amir Shah)
On Oct. 10, 2001, U.S. jets pounded the Afghan capital of Kabul. President George W. Bush unveiled a list of 22 most-wanted terrorists, including Osama bin Laden. Residents look at the damage caused in a wall by a U.S. air strike in the village of Deh Sabz, 20 kilometers (13 miles) north of the Afghan capital Kabul Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2001. Warplanes pounded also the Taliban’s home base of Kandahar early Wednesday for the third time in 24 hours, targeting the airport outside the southern Afghan city (AP Photo/Amir Shah) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/AMIR SHAH)
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The academy will be the first naval base filmed by Google.  (WTOP/Andrew Mollenbeck)
This is a general view looking north from barrier formed by slide dredges at work during construction in the Panama Canal Zone at Gaillard Cut, Culebra, Panama, on Oct. 30, 1915.  (AP Photo)
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek on August 3, 1943. Location unknown.  (AP Photo/Pool)
Japanese torchbearers of the Olympic flame relay team run through the rain on their way to the Olympic Stadium in October 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. The Olympic Flame is going to be lit by Yoshinori Sakai who was born in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, the day the nuclear weapon destroyed that city. He symbolizes the rebirth of Japan after the Second World War when he opens the Summer Olympic Games on October 10, 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo)
Sprio T. Agnew emerges from the federal court house in Baltimore Wednesday, Oct 10, 1973 after pleading no contest to a charge of federal tax evasion and resigning from the vice presidency. (AP Photo)
Residents look at the damage caused in a wall by a U.S. air strike in the village of Deh Sabz, 20 kilometers (13 miles) north of the Afghan capital Kabul Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2001. Warplanes pounded also  the Taliban's home base of Kandahar early Wednesday for the third time in 24 hours, targeting the airport outside the southern Afghan city (AP Photo/Amir Shah)

Today is Thursday, Oct. 10, the 283rd day of 2019. There are 82 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 10, 2001, U.S. jets pounded the Afghan capital of Kabul. President George W. Bush unveiled a list of 22 most-wanted terrorists, including Osama bin Laden.

On this date:

In 1845, the U.S. Naval Academy was established in Annapolis, Maryland.

In 1913, the Panama Canal was effectively completed as President Woodrow Wilson sent a signal from the White House by telegraph, setting off explosives that destroyed a section of the Gamboa dike.

In 1938, Nazi Germany completed its annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland (soo-DAYT’-uhn-land).

In 1943, Chiang Kai-shek took the oath of office as president of China.

In 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower apologized to the finance minister of Ghana, Komla Agbeli Gbdemah, after the official was refused seating in a Howard Johnson’s restaurant near Dover, Delaware.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy, responding to the Thalidomide birth defects crisis, signed an amendment to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act requiring pharmaceutical companies to prove that their products were safe and effective prior to marketing.

In 1964, the first Summer Olympics to be held in Asia were opened in Tokyo by Japanese Emperor Hirohito. Entertainer Eddie Cantor, 72, died in Beverly Hills, California.

In 1967, the Outer Space Treaty, prohibiting the placing of weapons of mass destruction on the moon or elsewhere in space, entered into force.

In 1973, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, accused of accepting bribes, pleaded no contest to one count of federal income tax evasion, and resigned his office.

In 1985, U.S. fighter jets forced an Egyptian plane carrying the hijackers of the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro (ah-KEE’-leh LOW’-roh) to land in Italy, where the gunmen were taken into custody. Actor-director Orson Welles died in Los Angeles at age 70; actor Yul Brynner died in New York at age 65.

In 1997, the International Campaign to Ban Landmines and its coordinator, Jody Williams, were named winners of the Nobel Peace Prize.

In 2004, Christopher Reeve, the “Superman” of celluloid who became a quadriplegic after a May 1995 horse riding accident, died in Mount Kisco, New York, at age 52.

Ten years ago: Turkey and Armenia signed a landmark agreement to establish diplomatic relations and open their sealed border after a century of enmity. President Barack Obama, addressing the Human Rights Campaign, restated his campaign pledge to allow homosexual men and women to serve openly in the military.

Five years ago: Malala Yousafzai (mah-LAH’-lah YOO’-suhf-zeye), a 17-year-old Pakistani girl, and Kailash Satyarthi (KY’-lash saht-YAHR’-thee), a 60-year-old Indian man, were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for risking their lives for the right of children to receive an education and to live free from abuse.

One year ago: Stocks plunged as investors feared that rising interest rates and trade tensions could hurt company profits; the Dow industrials fell 831 points, the worst loss for the index in eight months. President Donald Trump, reacting to the market turmoil, said the Federal Reserve was “making a mistake” with its campaign of rate increases. Trump demanded answers from Saudi Arabia about the fate of missing Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi (jah-MAHL’ khahr-SHOHK’-jee), as lawmakers pushed for sanctions. Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with winds of 155 miles per hour, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods, before continuing into south Georgia as a Category 3 hurricane.

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© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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