Today in History: June 10

In 1692, the first execution resulting from the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts took place as Bridget Bishop was hanged. In this painting, “Witch Hill/ The Salem Martyr” by Thomas Satterwhite Nobel in 1869, the town girl has been found guilty of witchcraft and is now walking to the gallows with the hangman and judges. (AP Photo)
This undated image released by Profiles in History shows the first chapter of a manuscript that would become the Alcoholics Anonymous “Big Book,” which includes stories and strategies for controlling addiction. The 161-page typed manuscript includes handwritten notes by Alcoholics Anonymous founders, including co-founder William Griffith Wilson, whose personal experiences are told in the first chapter titled “Bill’s Story.” Profiles in History announced Wednesday, April 12, 2017, that the manuscript will be publicly displayed in New York in May and will likely sell for more than $2 million when it goes up for auction in June. (Broad Highway Publishing Co. via AP)
In 1935, Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in Akron, Ohio, by Dr. Robert Holbrook Smith and William Griffith Wilson. This undated image released by Profiles in History shows the first chapter of a manuscript that would become the Alcoholics Anonymous “Big Book,” which includes stories and strategies for controlling addiction. The 161-page typed manuscript includes handwritten notes by Alcoholics Anonymous founders, including co-founder William Griffith Wilson, whose personal experiences are told in the first chapter titled “Bill’s Story.” Profiles in History announced Wednesday, April 12, 2017, that the manuscript will be publicly displayed in New York in May and will likely sell for more than $2 million when it goes up for auction in June. (Broad Highway Publishing Co. via AP)
Lidice, Czechoslovakia on June 10, 1942, as the village of Lidice was burned to the ground. The destruction of the village was a bid by the Germans to root out a group of Czech resistance fighters. (AP Photo/Czech News Agency)

In 1942, during World War II, German forces massacred 173 male residents of Lidice, Czechoslovakia, in retaliation for the killing of Nazi official Reinhard Heydrich. This photo shows the village of Lidice as it was burned to the ground. (AP Photo/Czech News Agency) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Joachim Gauck, Francois Hollande
In 1944, German forces massacred 642 residents of the French village of Oradour-sur-Glane. FILE – A Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013 file photo showing France’s President Francois Hollande, right, and German President Joachim Gauck, paying their respects after laying a wreath at the cemetery of the French martyr village of Oradour-sur-Glane, southwestern France. A German court on Tuesday threw out the case of a former SS man accused of involvement in the largest civilian massacre in Nazi-occupied France, saying there was not enough evidence to bring the 89-year-old to trial. Cologne resident Werner C., whose last name has not been revealed in accordance with German privacy laws, was charged with murder and accessory to murder in connection with the 1944 slaughter in Oradour-sur-Glane in southwestern France. (AP Photo/Phillipe Wojazer, Pool, File) (AP)
Affirmed, Steve Cauthen
In 1978, Affirmed, ridden by Steve Cauthen, won the 110th Belmont Stakes to claim horse racing’s 11th Triple Crown. (Alydar was second while Darby Creek Road came in third in a five-horse field.) In this May 6, 1978, file photo, Affirmed, with jockey Steve Cauthen up, crosses the finish line to win the 104th running of the Kentucky Derby in Louisville, Ky. After winning the Triple Crown in 1978, Affirmed went on to win his next race, the Jim Dandy. On Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015, American Pharoah will attempt to do what many Triple Crown champions have done throughout history, win their first race after victories in the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes. (AP Photo/File) (AP)
AP: 7cf23c18-47a0-4526-b71b-d4b8461a9f1d
In 1991, 11-year-old Jaycee Dugard of South Lake Tahoe, California, was abducted by Phillip and Nancy Garrido; Jaycee was held by the couple for 18 years before she was found by authorities. FILE – This Aug. 27, 2009 file family photo provided by Carl Probyn shows his stepdaughter, Jaycee Lee Dugard, who went missing in 1991. The California couple charged with kidnapping and raping Jaycee Dugard and holding her captive for 18 years are due back in court Thursday, April 7, 2011, as prosecutors and defense lawyers continue talks on a possible plea deal. Dugard was abducted in June 1991 on her way to school in South Lake Tahoe. Then 11, she was held for 18 years by Phillip and Nancy Garrido. She was raped repeatedly by Garrido and gave birth to two daughters. Dugard was freed after she and her two children appeared in public with Phillip Garrido and a police interrogation revealed her identity. Convicted of kidnapping and rape, Garrido was sentenced to 431 years in prison and his wife 36 years to life. (AP Photo/Carl Probyn, File) (AP)
FILE - In this June 12, 2018, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump shake hands at the conclusion of their meetings at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore. U.S. analysts say they have located more than half of an estimated 20 secret North Korean missile development facilities. The findings come as the Trump administration’s denuclearization talks with the North appear to have stalled. And they highlight the challenge the U.S. faces in ensuring that North Korea complies with any eventual agreement that covers its nuclear and missile programs.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool, File)
In 2018, President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrived in Singapore, two days ahead of their summit. FILE – In this June 12, 2018, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump shake hands at the conclusion of their meetings at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore. (AP/Susan Walsh)
(1/7)
This undated image released by Profiles in History shows the first chapter of a manuscript that would become the Alcoholics Anonymous “Big Book,” which includes stories and strategies for controlling addiction. The 161-page typed manuscript includes handwritten notes by Alcoholics Anonymous founders, including co-founder William Griffith Wilson, whose personal experiences are told in the first chapter titled “Bill’s Story.” Profiles in History announced Wednesday, April 12, 2017, that the manuscript will be publicly displayed in New York in May and will likely sell for more than $2 million when it goes up for auction in June. (Broad Highway Publishing Co. via AP)
Lidice, Czechoslovakia on June 10, 1942, as the village of Lidice was burned to the ground. The destruction of the village was a bid by the Germans to root out a group of Czech resistance fighters. (AP Photo/Czech News Agency)
Joachim Gauck, Francois Hollande
Affirmed, Steve Cauthen
AP: 7cf23c18-47a0-4526-b71b-d4b8461a9f1d
FILE - In this June 12, 2018, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump shake hands at the conclusion of their meetings at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore. U.S. analysts say they have located more than half of an estimated 20 secret North Korean missile development facilities. The findings come as the Trump administration’s denuclearization talks with the North appear to have stalled. And they highlight the challenge the U.S. faces in ensuring that North Korea complies with any eventual agreement that covers its nuclear and missile programs.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool, File)

Today is Monday, June 10, the 161st day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 10, 1967, six days of war in the Mideast involving Israel, Syria, Egypt, Jordan and Iraq ended as Israel and Syria accepted a United Nations-mediated cease-fire.

On this date:

In 1610, Englishman Lord De La Warr arrived at the Jamestown settlement to take charge of the Virginia Colony.

In 1692, the first execution resulting from the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts took place as Bridget Bishop was hanged.

In 1935, Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in Akron, Ohio, by Dr. Robert Holbrook Smith and William Griffith Wilson.

In 1942, during World War II, German forces massacred 173 male residents of Lidice (LIH’-dyiht-zeh), Czechoslovakia, in retaliation for the killing of Nazi official Reinhard Heydrich.

In 1944, German forces massacred 642 residents of the French village of Oradour-sur-Glane.

In 1957, in Canadian elections, John Diefenbaker (DEE’-fehn-BAY’-kur) led the Progressive Conservatives to an upset victory over the Liberal party of Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent (LOO’-ee sant law-RAHNT’).

In 1971, President Richard M. Nixon lifted a two-decades-old trade embargo on China.

In 1977, James Earl Ray, the convicted assassin of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., escaped from Brushy Mountain State Prison in Tennessee with six others; he was recaptured June 13.

In 1978, Affirmed, ridden by Steve Cauthen, won the 110th Belmont Stakes to claim horse racing’s 11th Triple Crown. (Alydar was second while Darby Creek Road came in third in a five-horse field.)

In 1990, Alberto Fujimori (foo-jee-MOHR’-ee) was elected president of Peru by a narrow margin over novelist Mario Vargas Llosa. Two members of the rap group 2 Live Crew were arrested in Hollywood, Florida (they and a third band member were later acquitted of obscenity charges).

In 1991, 11-year-old Jaycee Dugard of South Lake Tahoe, California, was abducted by Phillip and Nancy Garrido; Jaycee was held by the couple for 18 years before she was found by authorities.

In 2001, the Supreme Court, without comment, turned down a request to allow the videotaping of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh’s execution, scheduled for the following day.

Ten years ago: James von Brunn, an 88-year-old white supremacist, opened fire in the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., killing security guard Stephen T. Johns. (Von Brunn died at a North Carolina hospital in January 2010 while awaiting trial.) Donald Trump fired Miss California USA Carrie Prejean, who’d sparked controversy when she said gays shouldn’t be allowed to marry, citing contract violations.

Five years ago: In a stunning assault that exposed Iraq’s eroding central authority, al-Qaida-inspired militants overran much of Mosul. In a major victory for the tea party, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor was defeated by Dave Brat, a little-known economics professor, in Virginia’s Republican primary. A judge struck down tenure and other job protections for California’s public school teachers as unconstitutional, saying such laws harmed students by saddling them with bad teachers who were almost impossible to fire.

One year ago: President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrived in Singapore, two days ahead of their summit. The musical “The Band’s Visit” captured 10 Tony Awards. Rafael Nadal earned his 11th French Open title, and his 17th overall in Grand Slam events, beating Dominic Thiem in the men’s final.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up