Today in History: May 17

FILE - This Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, file photo shows the New York Stock Exchange. Global stocks recovered their poise Thursday, May 5, 2016, following an unconvincing start to the month, as investors became cautious ahead of U.S. jobs data that could go a long way to determining whether the Federal Reserve raises interest rates in June. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
In 1792, the New York Stock Exchange had its origins as a group of brokers met under a tree on Wall Street. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File) (AP)
A horse racing fan makes her way past the statue of Aristide, the first Kentucky Derby winner, in the paddock area at Churchill Downs, Saturday morning, May 7, 2005, in Louisville, Ky. The Kentucky Derby is the 10th race of the day. (AP Photo/ Darron Cummings)
In 1875, the first Kentucky Derby was run; the winner was Aristides, ridden by Oliver Lewis. Here, a horse racing fan makes her way past the statue of Aristides in the paddock area at Churchill Downs, Saturday morning, May 7, 2005, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/ Darron Cummings) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/DARRON CUMMINGS)
FILE - This May 17, 1954 file photo shows, from left, George E.C. Hayes, Thurgood Marshall, and James M. Nabrit joining hands as they pose outside the Supreme Court in Washington.  The three lawyers led the fight for abolition of segregation in public schools before the Supreme Court, which ruled today that segregation is unconstitutional. On May 17, 1954, a hushed crowd of spectators packed the Supreme Court, awaiting word on Brown v. Board of Education, a combination of five lawsuits brought by the NAACP's legal arm to challenge racial segregation in public schools. The high court decided unanimously that "separate but equal" education denied black children their constitutional right to equal protection under the law, effectively removing a cornerstone that propped up Jim Crow, or state-sanctioned segregation of the races. (AP Photo, File)
On May 17, 1954, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court handed down its Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision which held that racially segregated public schools were inherently unequal, and therefore unconstitutional. FILE – This May 17, 1954 file photo shows, from left, George E.C. Hayes, Thurgood Marshall, and James M. Nabrit joining hands as they pose outside the Supreme Court in Washington. The three lawyers led the fight for abolition of segregation in public schools before the Supreme Court. (AP Photo, File) (AP)
The frigate USS Stark displays a giant hole in her hull below the bridge, center, as it limps toward Bahrain, Tuesday, May 19, 1987. The vessel was hit by one or more French-made missiles fired from in Iraqi jet Sunday evening. Thirty-seven sailors died in the incident. (AP Photo)
In 1987, 37 American sailors were killed when an Iraqi warplane attacked the U.S. Navy frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf. (Iraq apologized for the attack, calling it a mistake, and paid more than $27 million in compensation.)  (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
President Clinton signs the "Megan's Law," named after the late Megan Kanka of Hamilton Township, N.J., Friday May 17, 1996 in the Oval Office of the White House. Looking on from left are, Megan's mother Maureen, brother Jeremy, 7, Rep. Dick Zimmer, R-N.J., and John Walsh, host of the "America's Most Wanted" television show. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin)
In 1996, President Bill Clinton signed a measure requiring neighborhood notification when sex offenders move in. “Megan’s Law,” as it’s known, was named for Megan Kanka, a seven-year-old New Jersey girl who was raped and murdered in 1994. Looking on from left are, Megan’s mother Maureen, brother Jeremy, 7, Rep. Dick Zimmer, R-N.J., and John Walsh, host of the “America’s Most Wanted” television show. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/DENIS PAQUIN)
** FILE ** Julie Goodridge, left, and her spouse Hillary Goodridge cross the street in front of the State House in Boston while leaving the Unitarian Universalist church after being married in this Monday, May 17, 2004 file photo.  According to a local political consultant, the couple whose lawsuit ultimately led to legal same-sex marriage in Massachusetts have announced they have separated. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson)
In 2004, Massachusetts became the first state to allow legal same-sex marriages. Here, Julie Goodridge, left, and her spouse Hillary Goodridge cross the street in front of the State House in Boston while leaving the Unitarian Universalist church after being married in this Monday, May 17, 2004 file photo. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/WINSLOW TOWNSON)
Robert Mueller
In 2017, the Justice Department appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a special counsel to oversee a federal investigation into potential coordination between Russia and Donald Trump’s campaign during the 2016 presidential election. FILE – In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed door meeting in Washington. It was one year ago Thursday when Robert Mueller, the former FBI director, was appointed as special counsel to take over the Justice Department’s investigation into possible coordination between Russia and Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File) (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Wolf Hall
In 1536, Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer declared the marriage of England’s King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn invalid after she failed to produce a male heir; Boleyn, already condemned for high treason, was executed two days later. This photo provided by Jeffrey Richards Associates shows, from left, Ben Miles (standing) as William Cromwell, Nathaniel Parker (seated) as Henry VIII and Lydia Leonard as Anne Boleyn, in a scene from The Shakespeare Company production of Mantel’s “Wolf Hall,” directed by Jeremy Herinn. (Johan Persson/Jeffrey Richards Associates via AP) (AP)
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FILE - This Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, file photo shows the New York Stock Exchange. Global stocks recovered their poise Thursday, May 5, 2016, following an unconvincing start to the month, as investors became cautious ahead of U.S. jobs data that could go a long way to determining whether the Federal Reserve raises interest rates in June. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
A horse racing fan makes her way past the statue of Aristide, the first Kentucky Derby winner, in the paddock area at Churchill Downs, Saturday morning, May 7, 2005, in Louisville, Ky. The Kentucky Derby is the 10th race of the day. (AP Photo/ Darron Cummings)
FILE - This May 17, 1954 file photo shows, from left, George E.C. Hayes, Thurgood Marshall, and James M. Nabrit joining hands as they pose outside the Supreme Court in Washington.  The three lawyers led the fight for abolition of segregation in public schools before the Supreme Court, which ruled today that segregation is unconstitutional. On May 17, 1954, a hushed crowd of spectators packed the Supreme Court, awaiting word on Brown v. Board of Education, a combination of five lawsuits brought by the NAACP's legal arm to challenge racial segregation in public schools. The high court decided unanimously that "separate but equal" education denied black children their constitutional right to equal protection under the law, effectively removing a cornerstone that propped up Jim Crow, or state-sanctioned segregation of the races. (AP Photo, File)
The frigate USS Stark displays a giant hole in her hull below the bridge, center, as it limps toward Bahrain, Tuesday, May 19, 1987. The vessel was hit by one or more French-made missiles fired from in Iraqi jet Sunday evening. Thirty-seven sailors died in the incident. (AP Photo)
President Clinton signs the "Megan's Law," named after the late Megan Kanka of Hamilton Township, N.J., Friday May 17, 1996 in the Oval Office of the White House. Looking on from left are, Megan's mother Maureen, brother Jeremy, 7, Rep. Dick Zimmer, R-N.J., and John Walsh, host of the "America's Most Wanted" television show. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin)
** FILE ** Julie Goodridge, left, and her spouse Hillary Goodridge cross the street in front of the State House in Boston while leaving the Unitarian Universalist church after being married in this Monday, May 17, 2004 file photo.  According to a local political consultant, the couple whose lawsuit ultimately led to legal same-sex marriage in Massachusetts have announced they have separated. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson)
Robert Mueller
Wolf Hall

Today is Friday, May 17, the 137th day of 2019. There are 228 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On May 17, 2004, Massachusetts became the first state to allow same-sex marriages.

On this date:

In 1536, Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer declared the marriage of England’s King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn invalid after she failed to produce a male heir; Boleyn, already condemned for high treason, was executed two days later.

In 1792, the New York Stock Exchange had its beginnings as a group of brokers met under a tree on Wall Street and signed the Buttonwood Agreement.

In 1946, President Harry S. Truman seized control of the nation’s railroads, delaying — but not preventing — a threatened strike by engineers and trainmen.

In 1954, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court handed down its Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision which held that racially segregated public schools were inherently unequal, and therefore unconstitutional.

In 1968, nine men and women, including brothers Daniel and Philip Berrigan, entered the Selective Service office in Catonsville, Maryland, seized several hundred draft files and burned them outside to protest the Vietnam War before being arrested. (The “Catonsville Nine,” as they came to be known, received federal prison sentences ranging from 24 to 42 months.)

In 1973, a special committee convened by the U.S. Senate began its televised hearings into the Watergate scandal.

In 1980, rioting that claimed 18 lives erupted in Miami’s Liberty City after an all-white jury in Tampa acquitted four former Miami police officers of fatally beating black insurance executive Arthur McDuffie.

In 1987, 37 American sailors were killed when an Iraqi warplane attacked the U.S. Navy frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf. (Iraq apologized for the attack, calling it a mistake, and paid more than $27 million in compensation.)

In 1996, President Bill Clinton signed a measure requiring neighborhood notification when sex offenders move in. (”Megan’s Law,” as it’s known, was named for Megan Kanka, a 7-year-old New Jersey girl who was raped and murdered in 1994.)

In 2002, former President Jimmy Carter ended a historic visit to Cuba sharply at odds with the Bush administration over how to deal with Fidel Castro, saying limits on tourism and trade often hurt Americans more than Cubans.

In 2006, the FBI began digging at a Michigan horse farm in search of the remains of former Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa; the two-week search yielded no evidence. It was announced that Paul McCartney and his second wife, Heather Mills McCartney, had agreed to separate.

In 2017, the Justice Department appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a special counsel to oversee a federal investigation into potential coordination between Russia and the 2016 Donald Trump campaign. Pvt. Chelsea Manning, the soldier who was sentenced to 35 years in a military prison for giving classified materials to WikiLeaks, walked free after serving seven years behind bars, her sentence having been commuted by President Barack Obama.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama strode head-on into the stormy abortion debate, telling graduates at the University of Notre Dame that both sides had to stop demonizing one another. In Sri Lanka, the Tamil Tigers admitted defeat in their fierce quarter-century war for a separate homeland. Barbara Mandrell, Roy Clark and Charlie McCoy were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Five years ago: Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed a “Right To Try” bill allowing terminally ill patients to obtain experimental drugs without getting federal approval. Thousands of cheering supporters welcomed Narendra Modi, India’s next prime minister, on his arrival in New Delhi after leading his party to a staggering victory in national elections. California Chrome won the Preakness to keep alive his bid for horse racing’s first Triple Crown since 1978 (California Chrome would finish tied for fourth in the Belmont three weeks later.)

One year ago: With six Democrats joining Republicans in voting to confirm her, Gina Haspel won Senate confirmation to become director of the CIA. The Miss America Organization announced that it would now have women in its three top leadership positions, after an email scandal in which male officials were caught making vulgar and insulting comments about past winners.

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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