Today in History: April 8

The signature of President Abraham Lincoln is seen on the 13th Amendment in a display at the Tennessee State Museum on Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, in Nashville, Tenn. The 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery, is on display along with the Emancipation Proclamation as part of an exhibit titled  Discovering the Civil War. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

In 1864, the United States Senate passed, 38-6, the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution abolishing slavery. (The House of Representatives passed it in Jan. 1865; the amendment was ratified and adopted in Dec. 1865.) In this 2013 photo, the signature of President Abraham Lincoln is seen on the 13th Amendment in a display at the Tennessee State Museum. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey) (AP/Mark Humphrey)

President Harry S Truman announces the government seizure of the steel industry on April 8, 1952.  His action came after the collapse in New York of union-industry negotiations designed to head off a strike of thousands of steelworkers on April 8. (AP Photo)

In 1952, President Harry S. Truman seized the American steel industry to avert a nationwide strike. (The Supreme Court later ruled that Truman had overstepped his authority, opening the way for a seven-week strike by steelworkers.) In this photo, Truman announces the government seizure of the steel industry. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/HWG)

Peter O'Toole, center, the Irish actor who is to play the title role in the film "Lawrence of Arabia" squats on the dusty ground as he takes a glass of tea with a couple of Beduin farmers on April 20, 1961 in Amman, Jordan. O'Toole has spent several weeeks among the Jordanian Arabs learning their language, local customs and how to ride a camel. (AP Photo)
In 1963, “Lawrence of Arabia” won the Oscar for best picture at the Academy Awards; Gregory Peck won best actor for “To Kill a Mockingbird” while Anne Bancroft received best actress honors for “The Miracle Worker.” Peter O’Toole, center, the Irish actor who is to play the title role in the film “Lawrence of Arabia” squats on the dusty ground as he takes a glass of tea with a couple of Beduin farmers on April 20, 1961 in Amman, Jordan. O’Toole has spent several weeks among the Jordanian Arabs learning their language, local customs and how to ride a camel. (AP Photo) (AP)
Atlanta Braves' Hank Aaron (44) breaks Babe Ruth's record for career home runs as he hits his 715th off Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Al Downing in the fourth inning of the game opener at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, Ga., Monday night, April 8, 1974.  (AP Photo)

On April 8, 1974, Hank Aaron of the Atlanta Braves hit his 715th career home run in a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, breaking Babe Ruth’s record. (AP Photo) (AP)

The Rev. Jimmy Swaggart gestures with the bible as spread the word of the Lord to the 14,000 faithful that packed the Los Angeles Sports Arena during his Los Angeles Crusade, Sunday, March 30, 1987. (AP Photo/Mark Avery)
In 1988, TV evangelist Jimmy Swaggart resigned from the Assemblies of God after he was defrocked for rejecting an order from the church’s national leaders to stop preaching for a year amid reports he had consorted with a prostitute. The Rev. Jimmy Swaggart gestures with the bible as spread the word of the Lord to the 14,000 faithful that packed the Los Angeles Sports Arena during his Los Angeles Crusade, Sunday, March 30, 1987. (AP Photo/Mark Avery) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Mark Avery)
Teenage AIDS victim Ryan White is surrounded by friends and reporters after a judge threw out a temporary injunction barring him from attending classes at Western Middle School near Kokomo, Ind., April 10, 1986. Ryan's mother Jeanne is at left and attorney Charles V. Vaughn is at rear.  (AP Photo)
In 1990, Ryan White, the teenage AIDS patient whose battle for acceptance had gained national attention, died in Indianapolis at age 18. Teenage AIDS victim Ryan White is surrounded by friends and reporters after a judge threw out a temporary injunction barring him from attending classes at Western Middle School near Kokomo, Ind., April 10, 1986. Ryan’s mother Jeanne is at left and attorney Charles V. Vaughn is at rear. (AP Photo) (AP)
Kurt Cobain
In 1994, Kurt Cobain, singer and guitarist for the grunge band Nirvana, was found dead in Seattle from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound; he was 27. FILE – Lead singer of the US rock band Nirvana Kurt Cobain is shown in a 1993 file photo. Cobain is the focus of a new documentary that probes the life and untimely death of the Nirvana singer-guitarist. It will be released in theaters next year and air exclusively on HBO, the network said Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Mark J.Terrill, File) (AP)
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The signature of President Abraham Lincoln is seen on the 13th Amendment in a display at the Tennessee State Museum on Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, in Nashville, Tenn. The 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery, is on display along with the Emancipation Proclamation as part of an exhibit titled  Discovering the Civil War. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
President Harry S Truman announces the government seizure of the steel industry on April 8, 1952.  His action came after the collapse in New York of union-industry negotiations designed to head off a strike of thousands of steelworkers on April 8. (AP Photo)
Peter O'Toole, center, the Irish actor who is to play the title role in the film "Lawrence of Arabia" squats on the dusty ground as he takes a glass of tea with a couple of Beduin farmers on April 20, 1961 in Amman, Jordan. O'Toole has spent several weeeks among the Jordanian Arabs learning their language, local customs and how to ride a camel. (AP Photo)
Atlanta Braves' Hank Aaron (44) breaks Babe Ruth's record for career home runs as he hits his 715th off Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Al Downing in the fourth inning of the game opener at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, Ga., Monday night, April 8, 1974.  (AP Photo)
The Rev. Jimmy Swaggart gestures with the bible as spread the word of the Lord to the 14,000 faithful that packed the Los Angeles Sports Arena during his Los Angeles Crusade, Sunday, March 30, 1987. (AP Photo/Mark Avery)
Teenage AIDS victim Ryan White is surrounded by friends and reporters after a judge threw out a temporary injunction barring him from attending classes at Western Middle School near Kokomo, Ind., April 10, 1986. Ryan's mother Jeanne is at left and attorney Charles V. Vaughn is at rear.  (AP Photo)
Kurt Cobain

Today is Monday, April 8, the 98th day of 2019. There are 267 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On April 8, 1994, Kurt Cobain, singer and guitarist for the grunge band Nirvana, was found dead in Seattle from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound; he was 27.

On this date:

In 1864, the United States Senate passed, 38-6, the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution abolishing slavery. (The House of Representatives passed it in January 1865; the amendment was ratified and adopted in December 1865.)

In 1911, an explosion at the Banner Coal Mine in Littleton, Alabama, claimed the lives of 128 men, most of them convicts loaned out from prisons.

In 1913, the 17th Amendment to the Constitution, providing for popular election of U.S. senators (as opposed to appointment by state legislatures), was ratified. President Woodrow Wilson became the first chief executive since John Adams to address Congress in person as he asked lawmakers to enact tariff reform.

In 1952, President Harry S. Truman seized the American steel industry to avert a nationwide strike. (The Supreme Court later ruled that Truman had overstepped his authority, opening the way for a seven-week strike by steelworkers.)

In 1961, a suspected bomb exploded aboard the passenger liner MV Dara in the Persian Gulf, causing it to sink; 238 of the 819 people aboard were killed.

In 1963, “Lawrence of Arabia” won the Oscar for best picture at the Academy Awards; Gregory Peck won best actor for “To Kill a Mockingbird” while Anne Bancroft received best actress honors for “The Miracle Worker.”

In 1974, Hank Aaron of the Atlanta Braves hit his 715th career home run in a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, breaking Babe Ruth’s record.

In 1988, TV evangelist Jimmy Swaggart resigned from the Assemblies of God after he was defrocked for rejecting an order from the church’s national leaders to stop preaching for a year amid reports he had consorted with a prostitute.

In 1990, Ryan White, the teenage AIDS patient whose battle for acceptance had gained national attention, died in Indianapolis at age 18.

In 1993, singer Marian Anderson died in Portland, Oregon, at age 96.

In 2003, kidnapper-rapist John Jamelske, who had imprisoned five women and girls, one after another, as sex slaves inside a makeshift dungeon in his DeWitt, New York, home, was arrested. (Jamelske, who pleaded guilty to five counts of first-degree kidnapping, is serving an 18 years-to-life sentence in a maximum-security prison.)

In 2013, President Barack Obama warned Congress not to use delaying tactics against tighter gun regulations and told families of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victims during a visit to Hartford, Connecticut, that he was “determined as ever” to honor their children with tougher laws. Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, 87, died in London. Actress and former Disney “Mouseketeer” Annette Funicello, 70, died in Bakersfield, California.

Ten years ago: Somali pirates hijacked the U.S.-flagged Maersk Alabama; although the crew was able to retake the cargo ship, the captain, Richard Phillips, was taken captive by the raiders and held aboard a lifeboat. (Phillips was rescued four days later by Navy SEAL snipers who shot three of the pirates dead.) A Russian spacecraft carrying a crew of three, including U.S. billionaire space tourist Charles Simonyi, landed safely in Kazakhstan. David “Pop” Winans Sr., patriarch of the award-winning Winans gospel music family, died in Nashville, Tennessee, at age 74.

Five years ago: The U.S. said it would keep its current force of 450 land-based nuclear missiles but remove 50 from their launch silos as part of a plan to bring the U.S. into compliance with a 2011 US-Russia arms control treaty. Breanna Stewart scored 21 points and Stefanie Dolson added 17 points and 16 rebounds to help UConn beat Notre Dame 79-58, giving the Huskies a record ninth women’s national championship.

One year ago: Patrick Reed won the Masters golf tournament for his first victory in a major, turning back late challenges from Rickie Fowler and Jordan Spieth. Chuck McCann, a zany comic who hosted a children’s TV show in the 1960s before branching out as a character actor in films and on TV, died of congestive heart failure at a Los Angeles hospital; he was 83.

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© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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