Today in History: March 18

Shown are notes written by Benjamin Franklin in a bound pamphlet about the Stamp Act, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2006, in Philadelphia, which is one title from a collection of books once owned by Franklin.  The Library Company of Philadelphia next month expects to publish a catalog of more than 3,700 titles from Franklin's extensive private library. (AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek)
On March 18, 1766, Britain repealed the Stamp Act of 1765. Shown here are notes written by Benjamin Franklin in a bound pamphlet about the Stamp Act, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2006, in Philadelphia, which is one title from a collection of books once owned by Franklin.  (AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/JOSEPH KACZMAREK)
Rescue workers probe the twisted steel skeleton of the building of the Consolidated School in New London, Texas, which was demolished following a natural gas explosion March 17, 1937. Hundreds were killed in the disaster.  (AP Photo)
In 1937, some 300 people, mostly children, were killed in a gas explosion at a school in New London, Texas. Here, rescue workers probe the twisted steel skeleton of the building of the Consolidated School in New London, Texas. (AP Photo) (Associated Press)
Benito Mussolini, left, and Adolf Hitler move along in step, smilingly accepting the plaudits of Munich residents when they met to discuss armistice terms for beaten France on June 18, 1940. Joyous expressions on faces of women and girls at left as they raise their arms to “Heil” the axis leaders. (AP Photo)
In 1940, Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini met at the Brenner Pass, where the Italian dictator agreed to join Germany’s war against France and Britain. Here, Mussolini, left, and Hitler on June 18, 1940.  (AP Photo) (AP)
FILE - In this April 13, 1943 black-and-white file photo, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt speaks in Washington. When President Barack Obama's re-election campaign unveiled a new slogan, some conservative critics were quick to pounce. "Forward", they asserted, is a word long associated with Europe's radical left, reaffirming their contention that Obama is, to some degree a socialist. Using "socialist" as a political epithet in the U.S. dates back to pre-Civil War days when abolitionist newspaper editor Horace Greeley was branded a socialist by some pro-slavery adversaries. Decades later, many elements of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal _ including Social Security _ were denounced as socialist. (AP Photo/Robert Clover, File)
In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order authorizing the War Relocation Authority, which was put in charge of interning Japanese-Americans, with Milton S. Eisenhower (the younger brother of Dwight D. Eisenhower) as its director. In this April 13, 1943 black-and-white file photo, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt speaks in Washington. (AP Photo/Robert Clover, File) (AP/Robert Clover)
President Dwight  Eisenhower signs the bill to make Hawaii the 50th State at the White House on March 17, 1959 in Washington. The chief executive used several pens in placing his signature on the measure. (AP Photo/Charles Gorry)
In 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Hawaii statehood bill.  (AP Photo/Charles Gorry) (AP/CHARLES GORRY)
Second photo of a three-picture sequence showing Soviet Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov as the first man to venture outside a space ship in outer space, March 18, 1965.  Here he floats free of the Voshkod-2 capsule.  Projection at right is movie camera to record his maneuvers.  Photos are from Moscow TV screen during showing of what Soviet officials said were TV pictures transmitted March 18 from the space ship. (AP Photo/Tass)
In 1965, the first spacewalk took place as Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov went outside his Voskhod 2 capsule, secured by a tether. Seen here, the second photo of a three-picture sequence showing Soviet Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov as the first man to venture outside a space ship in outer space, March 18, 1965. The photo is from Moscow TV screen during a showing of what Soviet officials said were TV pictures transmitted March 18 from the space ship. (AP Photo/Tass) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
FILE - In this undated photo released by the Schindler family, Terri Schiavo is shown before she suffered catastrophic brain damage that lead to an epic legal battle that involved dozens of judges in numerous jurisdictions, including the U.S. Supreme Court. Terri Schiavo died in 2005. As Jeb Bush, then the Governor of Florida,  prepares for a likely presidential bid, one name seems destined to loom large over his potential campaign: Terri Schiavo. The battle over the fate of the brain-damaged woman from the Tampa Bay-area was a defining moment in Bush’s governorship, and two events this week suggested that his controversial intervention to keep her alive will remain a political flashpoint. (AP Photo/Schindler Family Photo, File)  NO SALES
In 2005, Doctors in Florida, acting on orders of a state judge, removed Terri Schiavo’s feeding tube. (Despite the efforts of congressional Republicans to intervene and repeated court appeals by Schiavo’s parents, the brain-damaged woman died on March 31, 2005, at age 41.) In this undated photo released by the Schindler family, Terri Schiavo is shown before she suffered catastrophic brain damage that lead to an epic legal battle that involved dozens of judges in numerous jurisdictions, including the U.S. Supreme Court. Terri Schiavo died in 2005. (AP Photo/Schindler Family Photo, File) NO SALES (AP/Anonymous)
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Shown are notes written by Benjamin Franklin in a bound pamphlet about the Stamp Act, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2006, in Philadelphia, which is one title from a collection of books once owned by Franklin.  The Library Company of Philadelphia next month expects to publish a catalog of more than 3,700 titles from Franklin's extensive private library. (AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek)
Rescue workers probe the twisted steel skeleton of the building of the Consolidated School in New London, Texas, which was demolished following a natural gas explosion March 17, 1937. Hundreds were killed in the disaster.  (AP Photo)
Benito Mussolini, left, and Adolf Hitler move along in step, smilingly accepting the plaudits of Munich residents when they met to discuss armistice terms for beaten France on June 18, 1940. Joyous expressions on faces of women and girls at left as they raise their arms to “Heil” the axis leaders. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this April 13, 1943 black-and-white file photo, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt speaks in Washington. When President Barack Obama's re-election campaign unveiled a new slogan, some conservative critics were quick to pounce. "Forward", they asserted, is a word long associated with Europe's radical left, reaffirming their contention that Obama is, to some degree a socialist. Using "socialist" as a political epithet in the U.S. dates back to pre-Civil War days when abolitionist newspaper editor Horace Greeley was branded a socialist by some pro-slavery adversaries. Decades later, many elements of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal _ including Social Security _ were denounced as socialist. (AP Photo/Robert Clover, File)
President Dwight  Eisenhower signs the bill to make Hawaii the 50th State at the White House on March 17, 1959 in Washington. The chief executive used several pens in placing his signature on the measure. (AP Photo/Charles Gorry)
Second photo of a three-picture sequence showing Soviet Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov as the first man to venture outside a space ship in outer space, March 18, 1965.  Here he floats free of the Voshkod-2 capsule.  Projection at right is movie camera to record his maneuvers.  Photos are from Moscow TV screen during showing of what Soviet officials said were TV pictures transmitted March 18 from the space ship. (AP Photo/Tass)
FILE - In this undated photo released by the Schindler family, Terri Schiavo is shown before she suffered catastrophic brain damage that lead to an epic legal battle that involved dozens of judges in numerous jurisdictions, including the U.S. Supreme Court. Terri Schiavo died in 2005. As Jeb Bush, then the Governor of Florida,  prepares for a likely presidential bid, one name seems destined to loom large over his potential campaign: Terri Schiavo. The battle over the fate of the brain-damaged woman from the Tampa Bay-area was a defining moment in Bush’s governorship, and two events this week suggested that his controversial intervention to keep her alive will remain a political flashpoint. (AP Photo/Schindler Family Photo, File)  NO SALES

Today is Monday, March 18, the 77th day of 2019. There are 288 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On March 18, 1965, the first spacewalk took place as Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov went outside his Voskhod 2 capsule, secured by a tether.

On this date:

In 1766, Britain repealed the Stamp Act of 1765.

In 1925, the Tri-State Tornado struck southeastern Missouri, southern Illinois and southwestern Indiana, resulting in some 700 deaths.

In 1937, in America’s worst school disaster, nearly 300 people, most of them children, were killed in a natural gas explosion at the New London Consolidated School in Rusk County, Texas.

In 1938, Mexican President Lazaro Cardenas nationalized his country’s petroleum reserves and took control of foreign-owned oil facilities.

In 1940, Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini met at the Brenner Pass, where the Italian dictator agreed to join Germany’s war against France and Britain.

In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order authorizing the War Relocation Authority, which was put in charge of interning Japanese-Americans, with Milton S. Eisenhower (the younger brother of Dwight D. Eisenhower) as its director.

In 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Hawaii statehood bill. (Hawaii became a state on Aug. 21, 1959.)

In 1963, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Gideon v. Wainwright, ruled unanimously that state courts were required to provide legal counsel to criminal defendants who could not afford to hire an attorney on their own.

In 1980, Frank Gotti, the 12-year-old youngest son of mobster John Gotti, was struck and killed by a car driven by John Favara, a neighbor in Queens, New York. (The following July, Favara vanished, the apparent victim of a gang hit.)

In 2002, Brittanie Cecil died two days short of her 14th birthday after being hit in the head by a puck at a game between the host Columbus Blue Jackets and Calgary Flames; it was apparently the first such fan fatality in NHL history.

In 2005, Doctors in Florida, acting on orders of a state judge, removed Terri Schiavo’s feeding tube. (Despite the efforts of congressional Republicans to intervene and repeated court appeals by Schiavo’s parents, the brain-damaged woman died on March 31, 2005, at age 41.)

In 2017, Chuck Berry, rock ‘n’ roll’s founding guitar hero and storyteller who defined the music’s joy and rebellion in such classics as “Johnny B. Goode,” ”Sweet Little Sixteen” and “Roll Over Beethoven,” died at his home west of St. Louis at age 90.

Ten years ago: Under intense pressure from the Obama administration and Congress, the head of bailed-out insurance giant AIG, Edward Liddy, told Congress that some of the firm’s executives had begun returning all or part of bonuses totaling $165 million. Tony-winning actress Natasha Richardson, 45, died at a New York hospital two days after suffering a head injury while skiing in Canada.

Five years ago: With a sweep of his pen, President Vladimir Putin added Crimea to the map of Russia, provoking denunciations from the Western leaders who called Putin a threat to the world. Venture capitalist Bruce Rauner won the GOP primary in his bid for Illinois governor (he went on to defeat the Democratic incumbent, Pat Quinn). A KOMO-TV news helicopter crashed and burst into flames near Seattle’s Space Needle, killing both people on board.

One year ago: A self-driving Uber SUV struck and killed a pedestrian in suburban Phoenix in the first death involving a fully autonomous test vehicle; Uber suspended its autonomous vehicle testing program in Arizona, California, Pittsburgh and Toronto after the crash. Vladimir Putin rolled to a crushing re-election victory for six more years as Russia’s president. The fourth in a series of bombings in Austin, Texas, left two people injured; authorities said it was triggered along a street by a nearly invisible tripwire. “Black Panther” became the first film since “Avatar” in 2009 to top the weekend box office for five weeks in a row.

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© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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