Today in History: Feb. 5

This editorial cartoon depicts President Franklin Roosevelt and the Supreme Court, Feb. 6, 1937. (AP Photo)
In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed increasing the number of Supreme Court justices; critics accused Roosevelt of attempting to “pack” the court. (The proposal failed in Congress.) This editorial cartoon depicts President Franklin Roosevelt and the Supreme Court, Feb. 6, 1937. (AP Photo) (AP/UNCREDITED)
F 334606 001 Usa File Photo: Apollo 14 Astronauts, (L-R) Stuart Roosa, Alan B. Shepard, Jr., And Edgar Mitchell, Speak To Personnel Aboard The Prime Recovery Vessel Through The Window Of The Mobile Quarantine Facility Following Their Recovery From The Pacific Ocean Feburary 9, 1971. Apollo 14 Splashed Down Precisely On Target Approximately 780 Nautical Miles Southeast Of America Samoa. Alan Shepard Died July 22, 1998.  (Photo By Nasa/Getty Images)
In 1971, Apollo 14 astronauts Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell stepped onto the surface of the moon in the first of two lunar excursions. Here, Apollo 14 Astronauts, (L-R) Stuart Roosa, Alan B. Shepard, Jr., And Edgar Mitchell, speak to personnel aboard the prime recovery vessel through the window of the mobile quarantine facility following their recovery from the Pacific Ocean February 9, 1971. (Photo By Nasa/Getty Images) (Getty Images/NASA)
Lord Lieutenant of Argyll and Bute, Patrick Stewart, lays a wreath during a service at the American Moment at the Mull of Oa on Islay, Scotland, Friday May 4, 2018. Relatives of U.S. soldiers who died in two sea disasters off the coast of Scotland during World War I have traveled to the island of Islay for a service honoring those who were lost and the local people who rescued the survivors. The ceremony commemorates the sinking of two troop carriers, the SS Tuscania in February 1918 and the HMS Otranto eight months later, where some 700 U.S. servicemen and British crew members lost their lives. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)
In 1918, during World War I, the Cunard liner SS Tuscania, which was transporting about 2,000 American troops to Europe, was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Irish Sea with the loss of more than 200 people. Lord Lieutenant of Argyll and Bute, Patrick Stewart, lays a wreath during a service at the American Moment at the Mull of Oa on Islay, Scotland, Friday May 4, 2018. Relatives of U.S. soldiers who died in two sea disasters off the coast of Scotland during World War I have traveled to the island of Islay for a service honoring those who were lost and the local people who rescued the survivors. The ceremony commemorates the sinking of two troop carriers, the SS Tuscania in February 1918 and the HMS Otranto eight months later, where some 700 U.S. servicemen and British crew members lost their lives. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP) (AP/Jane Barlow)
Egypt's President Gamal Abdel Nasser stretches his arms to greet fellow Egyptians during a stop at one of the stations en route from Alexandria to Cairo, July 28, 1956. Earlier Nasser shouted an angry reply to British and French protests against his nationalization of the all-important Suez Canal. he was welcomed by cheering crowds which greeted him on his return to the capital, where he announced the taking-over of the canal the night of July 27.  (AP Photo)
In 1958, Gamal Abdel Nasser was formally nominated to become the first president of the new United Arab Republic (a union of Egypt and Syria which lasted until 1961). Egypt’s President Gamal Abdel Nasser stretches his arms to greet fellow Egyptians during a stop at one of the stations en route from Alexandria to Cairo, July 28, 1956. Earlier Nasser shouted an angry reply to British and French protests against his nationalization of the all-important Suez Canal. He was welcomed by cheering crowds which greeted him on his return to the capital, where he announced the taking-over of the canal the night of July 27. (AP Photo)   (AP)
Pres. Clinton signs the Family Leave Bill as Vicki Yandle of Marietta, Ga., looks on in the Rose Garden of the White House, Feb. 5, 1993.  Mrs. Yandle lost her job when she took time off when her daughter was sick.  Behind the president, from left, are: House Speaker Thomas Foley, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), Rep. William Ford (D-Mich.), and Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) At far right is Vice President Al Gore. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson)
In 1993, President Bill Clinton signed the Family and Medical Leave Act, granting workers up to 12 weeks unpaid leave for family emergencies. Pres. Clinton signs the Family Leave Bill as Vicki Yandle of Marietta, Ga., looks on in the Rose Garden of the White House, Feb. 5, 1993. Mrs. Yandle lost her job when she took time off when her daughter was sick. Behind the president, from left, are: House Speaker Thomas Foley, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), Rep. William Ford (D-Mich.), and Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) At far right is Vice President Al Gore. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson) (AP/Greg Gibson)
Former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson leaves court in Rockville, Md. Tuesday Dec. 1, 1998 after pleading no contest at his trial on two assault charges in connection with an August automobile accident. (AP Photo/Leslie E. Kossoff)
In 1999, Former heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson was sentenced in Rockville, Md., to a year in jail for assaulting two motorists following a traffic accident (he ended up serving 3 1/2 months). Former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson leaves court in Rockville, Md. Tuesday Dec. 1, 1998 after pleading no contest at his trial on two assault charges in connection with an August automobile accident. (AP Photo/Leslie E. Kossoff) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/LESLIE E. KOSSOFF)
Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps answers questions from reporters before training at the Meadowbrook Aquatic Center, Friday, Feb. 6, 2009, in Baltimore. The swimming superstar has been suspended for three months and had his training stipend revoked by USA Swimming. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)
Ten years ago: USA Swimming suspended Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps for three months after a photo showing him inhaling from a marijuana pipe became public. Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps answers questions from reporters before training at the Meadowbrook Aquatic Center, Friday, Feb. 6, 2009, in Baltimore. The swimming superstar has been suspended for three months and had his training stipend revoked by USA Swimming. (AP Photo/Gail Burton) (AP/Gail Burton)
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This editorial cartoon depicts President Franklin Roosevelt and the Supreme Court, Feb. 6, 1937. (AP Photo)
F 334606 001 Usa File Photo: Apollo 14 Astronauts, (L-R) Stuart Roosa, Alan B. Shepard, Jr., And Edgar Mitchell, Speak To Personnel Aboard The Prime Recovery Vessel Through The Window Of The Mobile Quarantine Facility Following Their Recovery From The Pacific Ocean Feburary 9, 1971. Apollo 14 Splashed Down Precisely On Target Approximately 780 Nautical Miles Southeast Of America Samoa. Alan Shepard Died July 22, 1998.  (Photo By Nasa/Getty Images)
Lord Lieutenant of Argyll and Bute, Patrick Stewart, lays a wreath during a service at the American Moment at the Mull of Oa on Islay, Scotland, Friday May 4, 2018. Relatives of U.S. soldiers who died in two sea disasters off the coast of Scotland during World War I have traveled to the island of Islay for a service honoring those who were lost and the local people who rescued the survivors. The ceremony commemorates the sinking of two troop carriers, the SS Tuscania in February 1918 and the HMS Otranto eight months later, where some 700 U.S. servicemen and British crew members lost their lives. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)
Egypt's President Gamal Abdel Nasser stretches his arms to greet fellow Egyptians during a stop at one of the stations en route from Alexandria to Cairo, July 28, 1956. Earlier Nasser shouted an angry reply to British and French protests against his nationalization of the all-important Suez Canal. he was welcomed by cheering crowds which greeted him on his return to the capital, where he announced the taking-over of the canal the night of July 27.  (AP Photo)
Pres. Clinton signs the Family Leave Bill as Vicki Yandle of Marietta, Ga., looks on in the Rose Garden of the White House, Feb. 5, 1993.  Mrs. Yandle lost her job when she took time off when her daughter was sick.  Behind the president, from left, are: House Speaker Thomas Foley, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), Rep. William Ford (D-Mich.), and Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) At far right is Vice President Al Gore. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson)
Former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson leaves court in Rockville, Md. Tuesday Dec. 1, 1998 after pleading no contest at his trial on two assault charges in connection with an August automobile accident. (AP Photo/Leslie E. Kossoff)
Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps answers questions from reporters before training at the Meadowbrook Aquatic Center, Friday, Feb. 6, 2009, in Baltimore. The swimming superstar has been suspended for three months and had his training stipend revoked by USA Swimming. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)

Today is Tuesday, Feb. 5, the 36th day of 2019. There are 329 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Feb. 5, 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed increasing the number of U.S. Supreme Court justices; the proposal, which failed in Congress, drew accusations that Roosevelt was attempting to “pack” the nation’s highest court.

On this date:

In 1917, Mexico’s present constitution was adopted by the Constitutional Convention in Santiago de Queretaro. The U.S. Congress passed, over President Woodrow Wilson’s veto, an act severely curtailing Asian immigration.

In 1918, during World War I, the Cunard liner SS Tuscania, which was transporting about 2,000 American troops to Europe, was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Irish Sea with the loss of more than 200 people.

In 1958, Gamal Abdel Nasser was formally nominated to become the first president of the new United Arab Republic (a union of Egypt and Syria which lasted until 1961).

In 1971, Apollo 14 astronauts Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell stepped onto the surface of the moon in the first of two lunar excursions.

In 1983, former Nazi Gestapo official Klaus Barbie, expelled from Bolivia, was brought to Lyon (lee-OHN’), France, to stand trial. (He was convicted and sentenced to life in prison — he died in 1991.)

In 1988, the Arizona House impeached Republican Gov. Evan Mecham (MEE’-kuhm), setting the stage for his trial in the state Senate, where he was convicted of obstructing justice and misusing state funds allegedly funneled to his Pontiac dealership.

In 1989, the Soviet Union announced that all but a small rear-guard contingent of its troops had left Afghanistan.

In 1993, President Bill Clinton signed the Family and Medical Leave Act, granting workers up to 12 weeks unpaid leave for family emergencies.

In 1999, Former heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson was sentenced in Rockville, Md., to a year in jail for assaulting two motorists following a traffic accident (he ended up serving 3 1/2 months).

In 2001, four disciples of Osama bin Laden went on trial in New York in the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa. (The four were convicted and sentenced to life in prison without parole.)

In 2002, A federal grand jury in Alexandria, Va., indicted John Walker Lindh on ten charges, alleging he was trained by Osama bin Laden’s network and then conspired with the Taliban to kill Americans. (Lindh later pleaded guilty to lesser offenses and was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison.)

In 2008, more than 80 tornadoes began touching down in the midwestern and southern U.S.; the deadliest of the twisters claimed 57 lives. Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a guru to the Beatles who introduced the West to transcendental meditation, died at his home in the Dutch town of Vlodrop; he was believed to be about 90.

Ten years ago: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer. USA Swimming suspended Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps for three months after a photo showing him inhaling from a marijuana pipe became public.

Five years ago: A U.N. human rights committee denounced the Vatican for adopting policies that it said allowed priests to rape and molest tens of thousands of children over decades. CVS Caremark announced it would pull cigarettes and other tobacco products from its stores. The state of Texas executed Suzanne Basso for torturing and killing Louis “Buddy” Musso, a mentally impaired man she’d lured to suburban Houston with the promise of marriage.

One year ago: Stocks took their worst loss in six and a half years, with the Dow Jones industrial average plunging more than 1,100 points. Jerome Powell was sworn in as the 16th chairman of the Federal Reserve. Former sports doctor Larry Nassar received his third long prison sentence, 40 to 125 years, for molesting young athletes at an elite Michigan gymnastics club. President Donald Trump accused Democrats of being “un-American” and perhaps “treasonous” for not clapping during his State of the Union address a week earlier.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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