Today in History: Feb. 23

FILE - In this Feb. 22, 1936 file photo, the chapel of Alamo, site of an heroic battle during the Texan war of independence from Mexico, is seen at nighttime in San Antonio. Built in the 18th century by Spanish missionaries looking to convert the local Native Americans, the Alamo gained its place in history in 1836, when about 200 Texas settlers died trying to defend the fort from Mexican forces. Among the dead: Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie and Lt. Col. William Travis, who promised never to surrender or retreat. The battle cry, "Remember the Alamo!" helped inspire Texans to defeat the Mexican army a month later, securing Texas's independence. (AP Photo, File)
On Feb. 23, 1836, the siege of the Alamo began in San Antonio, Texas. (AP Photo, File) (AP)
FILE- This undated file image shows a portrait painted by artist John Singleton Copley of John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States from 1825 to 1829. Historians noticed Adams' short diary entries are similar to modern day Twitter updates. So starting Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2009, the Massachusetts Historical Society begins posting Twitter updates from his diary entries 200 years ago.  (AP Photo)
In 1848, the sixth president of the United States, John Quincy Adams, died in Washington, D.C., at age 80. This undated file image shows a portrait painted by artist John Singleton Copley of John Quincy Adams, president of the United States from 1825 to 1829. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
FILE - This June 19, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Communications Commission building in Washington. Cellphone and broadband providers are excluding some video from data caps, meaning consumers have more data available for other apps and services. But the net neutrality rules from the Federal Communications Commission don’t ban these practices, saying it could benefit consumers in some cases. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
In 1927, President Calvin Coolidge signed a bill creating the Federal Radio Commission, forerunner of the Federal Communications Commission. FILE – This June 19, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Communications Commission building in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File) (AP)
FILE - In this Feb. 23, 1945, file photo, U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment, 5th Division, raise a U.S. flag atop Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima. Two Gastonia, N.C., men, Joseph Tedder, 90, and Mack Drake, 89, fought alongside more than 70,000 Marines, sailors and airmen on Iwo Jima, a tiny 8-square mile speck of volcanic rock and sand midway between Guam and Tokyo, during the closing months of World War II. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal, File)
In 1945, during World War II, U.S. Marines on Iwo Jima captured Mount Suribachi, where they raised a pair of American flags (the second flag-raising was captured in the iconic Associated Press photograph). FILE – In this Feb. 23, 1945, file photo, U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment, 5th Division, raise a U.S. flag atop Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal, File) (AP/Joe Rosenthal)
Dr. Jonas Salk, Pittsburgh scientist who discovered the Polio vaccine, administers an injection to an unidentified boy at Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsbrugh, Pa., Feb. 23, 1954.  (AP Photo)
In 1954, the first mass inoculation of schoolchildren against polio using the Salk vaccine began in Pittsburgh as some 5,000 students were vaccinated. Dr. Jonas Salk, Pittsburgh scientist who discovered the Polio vaccine, administers an injection to an unidentified boy at Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsbrugh, Pa., Feb. 23, 1954. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Firemen on a ladder search the remains of a Winter Garden, Fla., apartment building Monday, Feb. 23,1998. At least 29 people have been confirmed dead in central Florida after tornadoes slammed against the state early Monday. (APPhoto/J. Pat Carter)
In 1998, 42 people were killed, some 2,600 homes and businesses damaged or destroyed, by tornadoes in central Florida. Firemen on a ladder search the remains of a Winter Garden, Fla., apartment building Monday, Feb. 23,1998. At least 29 people have been confirmed dead in central Florida after tornadoes slammed against the state early Monday. (APPhoto/J. Pat Carter) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/J.PAT CARTER)
An Israeli police officer looks at Samuel Sheinbein at the Tel Aviv court Thursday, Sept. 2, 1999.  The Maryland teen-ager admitted in an Israeli court Thursday that he strangled an acquaintance in 1997, part of a plea bargain under which he will serve 24 years in an Israeli prison.   (AP Photo/Eyal Warshavsky)
Samuel Sheinbein, 33, who’d fled from the U.S. to Israel after murdering and dismembering a Maryland man in 1997, was killed in a shootout at an Israeli prison. An Israeli police officer looks at Samuel Sheinbein at the Tel Aviv court Thursday, Sept. 2, 1999. The Maryland teen-ager admitted in an Israeli court Thursday that he strangled an acquaintance in 1997, part of a plea bargain under which he will serve 24 years in an Israeli prison. (AP Photo/Eyal Warshavsky) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/EYAL WARSHAVSKY)
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FILE - In this Feb. 22, 1936 file photo, the chapel of Alamo, site of an heroic battle during the Texan war of independence from Mexico, is seen at nighttime in San Antonio. Built in the 18th century by Spanish missionaries looking to convert the local Native Americans, the Alamo gained its place in history in 1836, when about 200 Texas settlers died trying to defend the fort from Mexican forces. Among the dead: Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie and Lt. Col. William Travis, who promised never to surrender or retreat. The battle cry, "Remember the Alamo!" helped inspire Texans to defeat the Mexican army a month later, securing Texas's independence. (AP Photo, File)
FILE- This undated file image shows a portrait painted by artist John Singleton Copley of John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States from 1825 to 1829. Historians noticed Adams' short diary entries are similar to modern day Twitter updates. So starting Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2009, the Massachusetts Historical Society begins posting Twitter updates from his diary entries 200 years ago.  (AP Photo)
FILE - This June 19, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Communications Commission building in Washington. Cellphone and broadband providers are excluding some video from data caps, meaning consumers have more data available for other apps and services. But the net neutrality rules from the Federal Communications Commission don’t ban these practices, saying it could benefit consumers in some cases. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 23, 1945, file photo, U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment, 5th Division, raise a U.S. flag atop Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima. Two Gastonia, N.C., men, Joseph Tedder, 90, and Mack Drake, 89, fought alongside more than 70,000 Marines, sailors and airmen on Iwo Jima, a tiny 8-square mile speck of volcanic rock and sand midway between Guam and Tokyo, during the closing months of World War II. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal, File)
Dr. Jonas Salk, Pittsburgh scientist who discovered the Polio vaccine, administers an injection to an unidentified boy at Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsbrugh, Pa., Feb. 23, 1954.  (AP Photo)
Firemen on a ladder search the remains of a Winter Garden, Fla., apartment building Monday, Feb. 23,1998. At least 29 people have been confirmed dead in central Florida after tornadoes slammed against the state early Monday. (APPhoto/J. Pat Carter)
An Israeli police officer looks at Samuel Sheinbein at the Tel Aviv court Thursday, Sept. 2, 1999.  The Maryland teen-ager admitted in an Israeli court Thursday that he strangled an acquaintance in 1997, part of a plea bargain under which he will serve 24 years in an Israeli prison.   (AP Photo/Eyal Warshavsky)

Today is Saturday, Feb. 23, the 54th day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Feb. 23, 1954, the first mass inoculation of schoolchildren against polio using the Salk vaccine began in Pittsburgh as some 5,000 students were vaccinated.

On this date:

In 1685, composer George Frideric Handel was born in present-day Germany.

In 1822, Boston was granted a charter to incorporate as a city.

In 1836, the siege of the Alamo began in San Antonio, Texas.

In 1848, the sixth president of the United States, John Quincy Adams, died in Washington D.C., at age 80.

In 1870, Mississippi was readmitted to the Union.

In 1927, President Calvin Coolidge signed a bill creating the Federal Radio Commission, forerunner of the Federal Communications Commission.

In 1942, the first shelling of the U.S. mainland during World War II occurred as a Japanese submarine fired on an oil refinery near Santa Barbara, California, causing little damage.

In 1945, during World War II, U.S. Marines on Iwo Jima captured Mount Suribachi, where they raised two American flags (the second flag-raising was captured in the iconic Associated Press photograph.)

In 1965, film comedian Stan Laurel, 74, died in Santa Monica, California.

In 1998, 42 people were killed, some 2,600 homes and businesses damaged or destroyed, by tornadoes in central Florida.

In 2004, the Army canceled its Comanche helicopter program after sinking $6.9 billion into it over 21 years. Education Secretary Rod Paige likened the National Education Association, the nation’s largest teachers union, to a “terrorist organization” during a private White House meeting with governors. (Paige later called it a poor choice of words, but stood by his claim the NEA was using “obstructionist scare tactics.”)

In 2005, a jury was selected in Santa Maria, California, to decide Michael Jackson’s fate on charges that he’d molested a teenage boy at his Neverland Ranch. (Jackson was later acquitted.)

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama pledged to dramatically slash the skyrocketing annual budget deficit as he started to dole out the record $787 billion economic stimulus package he’d signed the previous week.

Five years ago: The Sochi Olympics completed a 17-day run with Canada’s 3-0 victory over Sweden in the men’s hockey final, the last of 98 gold medal events. Dale Earnhardt Jr. persevered through rain and wrecks to win the Daytona 500 for the second time, a decade after his first victory in the “Great American Race.” Alice Herz Sommer, 110, believed to be the oldest survivor of the Holocaust, died in London. Samuel Sheinbein, 33, who’d fled from the U.S. to Israel after murdering and dismembering a Maryland man in 1997, was killed in a shootout at an Israeli prison.

One year ago: Rick Gates, a former senior adviser to Donald Trump’s election campaign, pleaded guilty to federal conspiracy and false-statements charges, becoming a cooperating witness in the probe of Trump’s campaign and Russia’s election interference. Florida Gov. Rick Scott announced plans to put more armed guards in schools and make it harder for young adults and some with mental illness to buy guns. Teachers and staff returned to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, for the first time since the shooting that left 17 people dead. Canada’s Olympic men’s hockey team failed to reach the final at the Winter Olympics in South Korea, losing to Germany 4-3 in the semifinals.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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