Today in History: Feb. 19

Aaron Burr, who served as Thomas Jefferson's vice president, is shown in an illustration on Oct. 4, 1956. Burr was indicted for murder in the duel slaying of Alexander Hamilton and later for treason in a plot to seize the new Louisiana Territory. (AP Photo)
In 1807, former Vice President Aaron Burr, accused of treason, was arrested in the Mississippi Territory, in present-day Alabama. (Burr was acquitted at trial.) Aaron Burr, who served as Thomas Jefferson’s vice president, is shown in an illustration on Oct. 4, 1956. Burr was indicted for murder in the duel slaying of Alexander Hamilton and later for treason in a plot to seize the new Louisiana Territory. (AP Photo) (AP)
FILE - In this March 30, 1942 file photo, Cpl. George Bushy, left, a member of the military guard which supervised the departure of 237 Japanese people for California, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are evacuated from Bainbridge Island, Wash. Throughout American history, during times of war and unrest, authorities have cited various reasons and laws to take children away from their parents. Examples include Native American boarding schools, Japanese internment camps and deportations that happened during the Great Depression. (AP Photo/File)
In 1942, during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which paved the way for the relocation and internment of people of Japanese ancestry, including U.S.-born citizens. Imperial Japanese warplanes raided the Australian city of Darwin; at least 243 people were killed. In this March 30, 1942 file photo, Cpl. George Bushy, left, a member of the military guard which supervised the departure of 237 Japanese people for California, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are evacuated from Bainbridge Island, Wash. Throughout American history, during times of war and unrest, authorities have cited various reasons and laws to take children away from their parents. Examples include Native American boarding schools, Japanese internment camps and deportations that happened during the Great Depression. (AP Photo/File) (AP)
ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, JUNE 20, 2016 AND THEREAFTER -FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1966 file photo, Betty Friedan, author of "The Feminine Mystique," speaks to a group in New York. The feminist is the founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW), which works for women's rights. (AP Photo/File)
In 1963, “The Feminine Mystique” by Betty Friedan was first published by W.W. Norton & Co. In this Nov. 21, 1966 file photo, Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique,” speaks to a group in New York. The feminist is the founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW), which works for women’s rights. (AP Photo/File) (AP)
Fred Rogers, host of the children's television show, "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" is shown in this 1969 photo.  Rogers, who gently invited millions of children to be his neighbor as host of the public television show Mister Rogers Neighborhood  for more than 30 years, died of cancer early Thursday, February 27, 2003 in Pittsburgh, Pa. He was 74. (AP Photo)
In 1968, the children’s program “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” created by and starring Fred Rogers, made its network debut on National Educational Television, a forerunner of PBS, beginning a 31-season run. Fred Rogers, host of the children’s television show, “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” is shown in this 1969 photo. Rogers, who gently invited millions of children to be his neighbor as host of the public television show “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” for more than 30 years, died of cancer on Feb. 27, 2003 in Pittsburgh, Pa. He was 74. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Today's Forecast: Fall Weather Capitol Building
In 1986, the U.S. Senate approved, 83-11, the Genocide Convention, an international treaty outlawing “acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group,” nearly 37 years after the pact had first been submitted for ratification. (Getty Images/Brendan Smialowski) (Getty Images/Brendan Smialowski)
FILE - In this Jan. 29, 1979 file photo, then U.S. President Jimmy Carter, right, and then Chinese Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping are seen outside the White House in Washington.  One wore a cowboy hat. Another visited Disneyland and Hollywood. Chinese President Xi Jinping’s trip to the U.S. mid-September, 2015, is the latest in a string of visits made over the years by China’s leaders since formal diplomatic relations were established between Washington and Beijing in 1979.  (AP Photo, File)
In 1997, Deng Xiaoping, the last of China’s major Communist revolutionaries, died at age 92. In this Jan. 29, 1979 file photo, then U.S. President Jimmy Carter, right, and then Chinese Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping are seen outside the White House in Washington. (AP Photo, File) (AP)
Ismail Haniyeh, Hamas' apparent choice for prime minister, center, replys to a greeting of lawmakers inside the Palestinian parliament in Gaza City, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2006. A Hamas-dominated Palestinian parliament was sworn in Saturday, and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas was expected to ask the Islamic militant group in his opening address to accept his moderate policies, including negotiations with Israel. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
In 2006, Israel halted the transfer of hundreds of millions of dollars in tax money to the Palestinians after Hamas took control of the Palestinian parliament. Ismail Haniyeh, Hamas’ apparent choice for prime minister, center, replies to a greeting of lawmakers inside the Palestinian parliament in Gaza City, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2006. A Hamas-dominated Palestinian parliament was sworn in days earlier, and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas was expected to ask the Islamic militant group in his opening address to accept his moderate policies, including negotiations with Israel. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko) (AP/ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO)
Fidel Castro, at right,  speaking just after he took office as new Cuban leader during  a television  speech, with Cuban President Manuel Urrutia left on Feb. 16, 1959. (AP Photo)
In 2008, an ailing Fidel Castro resigned the Cuban presidency after nearly a half-century in power; his brother Raul was later named to succeed him. In photo by AP, Fidel Castro, right, speaking just after he took office as new Cuban leader during a television speech, with Cuban President Manuel Urrutia left on Feb. 16, 1959. (AP/NC)
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Aaron Burr, who served as Thomas Jefferson's vice president, is shown in an illustration on Oct. 4, 1956. Burr was indicted for murder in the duel slaying of Alexander Hamilton and later for treason in a plot to seize the new Louisiana Territory. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this March 30, 1942 file photo, Cpl. George Bushy, left, a member of the military guard which supervised the departure of 237 Japanese people for California, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are evacuated from Bainbridge Island, Wash. Throughout American history, during times of war and unrest, authorities have cited various reasons and laws to take children away from their parents. Examples include Native American boarding schools, Japanese internment camps and deportations that happened during the Great Depression. (AP Photo/File)
ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, JUNE 20, 2016 AND THEREAFTER -FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1966 file photo, Betty Friedan, author of "The Feminine Mystique," speaks to a group in New York. The feminist is the founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW), which works for women's rights. (AP Photo/File)
Fred Rogers, host of the children's television show, "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" is shown in this 1969 photo.  Rogers, who gently invited millions of children to be his neighbor as host of the public television show Mister Rogers Neighborhood  for more than 30 years, died of cancer early Thursday, February 27, 2003 in Pittsburgh, Pa. He was 74. (AP Photo)
Today's Forecast: Fall Weather Capitol Building
FILE - In this Jan. 29, 1979 file photo, then U.S. President Jimmy Carter, right, and then Chinese Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping are seen outside the White House in Washington.  One wore a cowboy hat. Another visited Disneyland and Hollywood. Chinese President Xi Jinping’s trip to the U.S. mid-September, 2015, is the latest in a string of visits made over the years by China’s leaders since formal diplomatic relations were established between Washington and Beijing in 1979.  (AP Photo, File)
Ismail Haniyeh, Hamas' apparent choice for prime minister, center, replys to a greeting of lawmakers inside the Palestinian parliament in Gaza City, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2006. A Hamas-dominated Palestinian parliament was sworn in Saturday, and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas was expected to ask the Islamic militant group in his opening address to accept his moderate policies, including negotiations with Israel. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
Fidel Castro, at right,  speaking just after he took office as new Cuban leader during  a television  speech, with Cuban President Manuel Urrutia left on Feb. 16, 1959. (AP Photo)

Today is Tuesday, Feb. 19, the 50th day of 2019. There are 315 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Feb. 19, 1968, the children’s program “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” created by and starring Fred Rogers, made its network debut on National Educational Television, a forerunner of PBS, beginning a 31-season run.

On this date:

In 1473, astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus was born in Torun, Poland.

In 1807, former Vice President Aaron Burr, accused of treason, was arrested in the Mississippi Territory, in present-day Alabama. (Burr was acquitted at trial.)

In 1846, the Texas state government was formally installed in Austin, with J. Pinckney Henderson taking the oath of office as governor.

In 1881, Kansas prohibited the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages.

In 1934, a blizzard began inundating the northeastern United States, with the heaviest snowfall occurring in Connecticut and Massachusetts.

In 1942, during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which paved the way for the relocation and internment of people of Japanese ancestry, including U.S.-born citizens. Imperial Japanese warplanes raided the Australian city of Darwin; at least 243 people were killed.

In 1945, Operation Detachment began during World War II as some 30,000 U.S. Marines began landing on Iwo Jima, where they commenced a successful month-long battle to seize control of the island from Japanese forces.

In 1963, “The Feminine Mystique” by Betty Friedan was first published by W.W. Norton & Co.

In 1986, the U.S. Senate approved, 83-11, the Genocide Convention, an international treaty outlawing “acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group,” nearly 37 years after the pact was first submitted for ratification.

In 1997, Deng Xiaoping (dung shah-oh-ping), the last of China’s major Communist revolutionaries, died at age 92.

In 2006, Israel halted the transfer of hundreds of millions of dollars in tax money to the Palestinians after Hamas took control of the Palestinian parliament.

In 2008, an ailing Fidel Castro resigned the Cuban presidency after nearly a half-century in power; his brother Raul was later named to succeed him.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama made a quick visit to Canada, his first trip outside the U.S. since taking office; he reassured Prime Minister Stephen Harper that the U.S. was not cultivating a protectionist streak despite its economic difficulties. A jury in Moscow voted unanimously to acquit three men in the killing of investigative reporter Anna Politkovskaya.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama, in Mexico for a North American summit, urged Ukraine to avoid violence against peaceful protesters or face consequences; shortly after Obama’s remarks, Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s office said he and opposition leaders had agreed on a truce. On Day 13 of the Sochi Games, Norway won the first Olympic mixed relay in biathlon and Ole Einar Bjoerndalen became the most decorated Winter Olympian ever with 13 medals. Ted Ligety won the giant slalom, becoming the first American man to win two Olympic gold medals in Alpine skiing.

One year ago: Syrian government forces began a bombing campaign in the northeastern suburbs of Damascus, the last major stronghold for rebels in the area of the capital; the campaign left hundreds dead. President Donald Trump endorsed Mitt Romney in Utah’s Senate race, another sign that the two Republicans were burying the hatchet after a strained relationship. The U.S. women’s Olympic hockey team reached the title game, shutting out Finland 5-0 in the semifinals. A French ice dancer at the Winter Olympics in South Korea suffered a wardrobe malfunction when her glittering emerald costume came unhooked at the neckline, exposing her left breast live on television; Gabriella Papadakis and her partner still managed to finish the program in second place.

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